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Coffeehouse

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NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
New York folk singers and musicians Lydia Adams Davis and Joe Heukerott will perform Friday at the Perimeter II Coffeehouse in the West Collingswood area of Haddon Township during one of the last performances of the season. The Perimeter II Coffeehouse, which will be ending its 20th season this month, specializes in folk performances, which include a wide variety of musical styles. Davis and Heukerott will perform original material individually and as a duet. "Folk music is a very general term that includes many varieties of music," said Anne Deeney, who has managed the club for nine years.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Wiffledust Salon presents performances by musicians Ben Arnold, Christopher Colucci and Beth Williams at 8 p.m. tomorrow. The new coffeehouse and dessert place presents the musicians in a smoke-free and alcohol-free environment. Tickets to the concert are $10 and may be bought in advance or at the door. For more information, call 610-649-9259. The Wiffledust Salon is at 1516 Surrey Lane, Wynnewood. Work by Women Artists: Selections from the Scott Memorial Study Collection opens Wednesday at the Campus Center Gallery of Bryn Mawr College.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The hammered dulcimer will be the instrument of choice Friday when John Lionarons takes the stage in the Circlewood Coffee House in Cherry Hill. Lionarons, of Collegeville, Pa., has traveled for more than 15 years, performing at clubs, coffeehouses and conventions and for school, community and corporate programs. His repertoire includes traditional Celtic ballads and American country, bluegrass and contemporary folk music, which he performs with a variety of instruments. In addition to the dulcimer, they include the guitar, mandolin, keyboards and harmonica.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When Ed Halpern ran the Gilded Cage coffeehouse in the '50s, his bemused Rittenhouse Square neighbors scratched their scalps as the teen-agers and college students came to dance the bohemian waltz: reading poetry, eating French onion soup, playing chess - and most importantly - getting wired on caffeine. "They couldn't figure out why people would want to sit around and talk and drink coffee," said Halpern, 65, who ran the place from 1956 to 1969. "A lot of younger people wanted a place to go where they could have discussions, play chess and have this atmosphere without drinking.
NEWS
October 10, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Esther Tabachnick Halpern, 79, of Center City, a musician who co-owned the Gilded Cage, an innovative Center City coffeehouse, died of liver failure Thursday at home. In 1956, when Mrs. Halpern and her husband, Edward, were newlyweds, they opened the Gilded Cage at 21st and Rittenhouse Streets. They sold espresso for 25 cents a cup. Ed Halpern assembled the corned beef sandwiches and Mrs. Halpern made onion soup - the first in Philadelphia to have a thick cheese crust, she told an Inquirer reporter in 1981.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A hurt person Could hate the bigot Who tore at his soul Or he could ask God To forgive him And in so doing Be made whole - To Be Made Whole A little more than a year ago, Helen Underhill lay in a bed at Saint Mary Hospital in Middletown after being seriously injured in a car accident in December 1990. On Saturday night, the 94-year-old poet and author will again perform works such as "To Be Made Whole" at a coffeehouse in the Peace Center in Langhorne.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sean Smith has perfected his mischievous face dance. When the redheaded boy winks, an eyebrow arches, his freckled nose scrunches, and his jaw drops wide open. Thus he sets the scene for a trilogy of one-liners. Sean is only 11. The Washington Township boy juggles his schoolwork at St. Teresa's Roman Catholic School in Runnemede with his stand-up comedy routine on the local coffeehouse circuit. On a snowy evening last month, at the Port City Java in Deptford, he confessed that he has a problem with dating - "It's hard to meet girls when you're not allowed to cross the street.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As Bonnie Raitt stepped up to the microphone, the tension in the room struck the audience silent, stilling all motion in the Main Point coffeehouse in Bryn Mawr. "She was easily the most nervous professional performer I ever saw," said Ed Peabody, who was there that night during the late 1960s. "She made everyone else nervous. We were all gritting our teeth, praying she wouldn't make a mistake. "When she got so popular later," he said, "I had to blink my eyes and wonder if it was the same person.
NEWS
November 23, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One might expect to find an espresso house in the quaint downtown areas in Moorestown, Haddonfield or Medford. But the blue-collar downtown strip in Browns Mills - where Pemberton Mayor T.C. Kay once complained that she couldn't even find a salad bar - seems more unlikely. Such perceptions did not deter Gary Dugan and his mother/business partner, Judy Serva, who recently opened The Daily Grind across the street from an aging, soon-to-be replaced Acme. The coffee phenomenon that has crossed the nation, they say, has conquered the final frontier: The time has come for Browns Mills to have a coffeehouse of its own. "Plenty of people come in here and say, 'A coffeehouse in Browns Mills?
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing for a smoke outside her Steel City Coffee House on a recent evening, Karin Leet considered how often over the last year she has fretted that the business might not succeed. "Every day. I think that every day," she said. Still, after 12 months in the heart of Phoenixville - a Chester County borough that Leet and other residents consider ripe for renaissance - Steel City has already taken on the air of a secure and trusted local institution. By day, a steady stream of Phoenixville denizens and visitors drift in for caffeine fixes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2012
A teacher, a retiree, and two lawyers who call themselves the Jersey Peaches swing into a version of "Summertime" as steamy as the weather. A singer-songwriter/recovering addict/unemployed mason from Mount Ephraim is on deck with his guitar. So is a communications professional and blues guy called 3 Cat Clem; he'll jam with a tattooed preacher who blows a heavenly harmonica. Welcome to Wide Open Mic night at the Barrington Coffee House, where strum and twang is on the menu every Thursday.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
Early crowds are finding ambition in Lansdowne at the gorgeous NoBL , a Mediterranean BYOB that opened last week in a long-ago hardware store at 24 N. Lansdowne Ave. (484-461-2689) It's a block off Baltimore Avenue — north, to be exact — which explains "NoBL. " It's the crew from the nearby Sycamore — owner Stephen Wagner and chef Sam Jacobson, who turns out such small plates as moussaka, mussels, pappardelle with chicken livers; grilled octopus; grilled artichokes; and 10-inch grilled pizzas.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
Her attacker played the nice guy, at first. "He said I had pretty eyes," recalled the woman who was raped the morning of March 31 inside the Bella Vista coffee shop where she worked. He soon turned vicious. "I thought he had a gun. . . . I thought he would shoot me in the back if I tried to escape," the woman, 29, testified yesterday during the preliminary hearing for Christopher Reeves, 32. Reeves, the lanky homeless man arrested last month and charged with attacking the woman inside the Bean Exchange Coffeehouse at 7th and Bainbridge streets, was ordered held for trial on rape and related charges by Municipal Judge James DeLeon.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bail for the man charged in the March 31 rape of a South Philadelphia barista was doubled to $300,000 Thursday after the prosecutor said the defendant was awaiting sentencing at the time of the attack and had failed to appear at six hearings in the past. Municipal Court Judge Dawn A. Segal granted the prosecutor's request in the case of Christopher Reeves, 32, and also granted a defense request to postpone Reeves' preliminary hearing to May 5, for more time to investigate. Reeves was arrested April 3 in Chester, three days after the assault and robbery at the Bean Exchange Coffeehouse at Seventh and Bainbridge Streets in Bella Vista.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
A handwritten note hung on the door of the Bean Exchange Coffee House in Bella Vista yesterday, thanking customers for their support in the wake of a robbery and sexual assault that happened inside the café early yesterday morning. Shortly after the coffee shop, at Bainbridge and 7th streets, opened at 6 a.m., a robber - identified by police as Christopher Reeves, 32 - came in and announced he was robbing the café, authorities said. He took $173 from the register, police said, then forced a 29-year-old female employee into a bathroom and sexually assaulted her about 6:30 a.m. Police said the victim was taken to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
"Cafe" is Philly born and bred. Writer-director Marc Erlbaum, who studied comparative literature at Penn, conceived and wrote part of the script while sitting at Green Line Cafe at 43rd and Baltimore, and even used the West Philly coffeehouse for exterior shots, albeit with a name change to West Philly Grounds. The plot is triggered by an unnamed tragedy. But then it hops back in time to focus on the interconnectivity of the lives of the shop's regular patrons, including a drug-dealing Jamie Kennedy, and employees, namely the lovesick Daniel Eric Gold ("Ugly Betty")
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Love can be so emotional. Tom Dougherty , 52, a machinist from Glenside, was prepared to propose to his girlfriend of three years, Peg Sautner , 49, of Northeast Philly, who handles special orders for Interline Brands, after they attended "Terror Behind the Walls," the haunted attraction at Eastern State Penitentiary. As much as Sautner loves the scary stuff, though, she suffered a spell of asthma amid all the fog during their walk-through and had to leave. Dougherty proposed out front while they waited for two of her children to finish the experience last weekend.
NEWS
October 10, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Esther Tabachnick Halpern, 79, of Center City, a musician who co-owned the Gilded Cage, an innovative Center City coffeehouse, died of liver failure Thursday at home. In 1956, when Mrs. Halpern and her husband, Edward, were newlyweds, they opened the Gilded Cage at 21st and Rittenhouse Streets. They sold espresso for 25 cents a cup. Ed Halpern assembled the corned beef sandwiches and Mrs. Halpern made onion soup - the first in Philadelphia to have a thick cheese crust, she told an Inquirer reporter in 1981.
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