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Cognac

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NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Debra Supples Keiser, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Leave the Dramamine home. And most of your makeup, too. For this French-river cruise, what you'll need is a bit of muscle, a spirit of adventure, and a bon appetit. This is no luxury barge; it's a soft-adventure vacation for all who have ever yearned for their own boat - what Crown Blue Line calls "self-skippered cabin cruisers. " You pilot the boat; you determine your itinerary. Your reward is a chance to savor the pristine countryside of France at the laid-back pace of 5 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a half-century ago, the club members sealed a bottle of Hennessy cognac in a glass canister and vowed not to open it - not until all but one of them had died. The last man, they said, would have the honor of toasting his departed comrades and remembering them to a world that had changed many times over since they went to war in 1918. One hundred and eight veterans of the "Great War" formed the Last Man's Club at American Legion Post 38. They have held dinners every year since 1940, their numbers dwindling.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EVERMORE, EVERMORE, QUOTH THE STEALTHY STRANGER Like a stealthy raven out of a misty night, a mysterious stranger wearing a dark coat and fedora swooped down on the Baltimore grave of Edgar Allan Poe yesterday morning to once again mark the poet's birthday. Four hours after a midnight dreary, the stranger deposited a half-empty bottle of French cognac and three white roses on Poe's headstone. Since 1949, a stranger has marked Poe's birth on Jan. 19, 1809, with a half-bottle of Martell cognac and roses.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie. I was in a bar last week and the guy next to me ordered some fancy rum that came in a snifter. What's up with that? I thought those were just for cognac and brandy. Marnie: There are cheap rums out there, Buzz, that are great for mixing into cocktails. But there are great rums for slow sipping, too. If it was served in a snifter, chances are that was a premium aged rum from the Caribbean or South America. Buzz: Aged rum, huh? They couldn't sell it fresh?
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
At 86, Thomas P. Kaas of Pottstown was alone yesterday with a bottle of cognac dating to the end of World War I. The bottle, shaped like a French army canteen, has belonged to Kaas for three weeks, ever since a pact made by 25 World War I veterans from the Pottstown area ended with the death of fellow infantryman Harry Ginther at the age of 90. The 25, all members of the George A. Amole post of the American Legion in Pottstown, paid...
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one who was there is left to savor the cognac. The last member of the Last Man's Club is gone. Thomas P. Kaas Sr., of Pottstown, died Saturday at Pottstown Memorial Medical Center. He was 86. The 69-year-old bottle of French cognac, shaped like a French army canteen, was inherited by Mr. Kaas last October, resulting from a pact made by 25 Pottstown-area veterans of World War I who called themselves the Last Man's Club. The bottle became his property when fellow infantryman Harry Ginther died in the same hospital at age 90. Mr. Kaas and the others were members of the George Amole Post of the American Legion in Pottstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009
This recipe by Brother Victor-Antoine d'Avila-Latourrette, author of several cookbooks, published in Madeline Scherb's "A Taste of Heaven: A Guide to Food and Drink Made By Monks and Nuns" (Tarcher, $15.95) Scherb suggests using caramels from Our Lady of the Mississippi Abbey in Dubuque, Iowa. These caramels can be purchased online at trappistine. com. BROTHER VICTOR'S PEAR CLAFOUTIS 3 eggs 1/2 cup sugar 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 1/2 cups whole milk 2 tablespoons Cognac or pear brandy 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 ripe Bosc pears, peeled, halved, cored Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg 12 to 14 vanilla caramels, unwrapped 1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
FOOD
September 16, 1987 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, Special to The Inquirer
Tomorrow night, when 1,600 guests sit down to celebrate the signing of the Constitution at the black-tie dinner at the Civic Center, they will participate in the Thirteen Toasts ceremony, a tradition that began 200 years ago to encourage all the states to ratify the Constitution. But as the glasses are raised, six of the eight wines (plus an after-dinner Cognac) will be French - not American. Pourquoi? You may well ask. It's true that in 1787, American wines were so horrific that many of the Constitution framers preferred imported wines.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Each April since 1940, John Barron has joined with members of Haddonfield's American Legion Post No. 38 to pay tribute to fellow veterans and to give a toast to comrades who had "gone west. " Last Monday night marked 70 years to the day that the United States entered World War I, and Barron and three of the other oldest members of the post gathered as usual with younger veterans to mark the occasion. This year, however, the festivities at the Silver Lake Inn in Clementon had special meaning.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie. I was in a bar last week and the guy next to me ordered some fancy rum that came in a snifter. What's up with that? I thought those were just for cognac and brandy. Marnie: There are cheap rums out there, Buzz, that are great for mixing into cocktails. But there are great rums for slow sipping, too. If it was served in a snifter, chances are that was a premium aged rum from the Caribbean or South America. Buzz: Aged rum, huh? They couldn't sell it fresh?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009
This recipe by Brother Victor-Antoine d'Avila-Latourrette, author of several cookbooks, published in Madeline Scherb's "A Taste of Heaven: A Guide to Food and Drink Made By Monks and Nuns" (Tarcher, $15.95) Scherb suggests using caramels from Our Lady of the Mississippi Abbey in Dubuque, Iowa. These caramels can be purchased online at trappistine. com. BROTHER VICTOR'S PEAR CLAFOUTIS 3 eggs 1/2 cup sugar 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 1/2 cups whole milk 2 tablespoons Cognac or pear brandy 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 ripe Bosc pears, peeled, halved, cored Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg 12 to 14 vanilla caramels, unwrapped 1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
FOOD
May 8, 2008
Treat Mom to an assortment of fresh artisan chocolates in gourmet flavors from praline to fleur de sel to Tahitian vanilla. Choose a one-of-each sampling or a custom selection of favorites. It's a gift that will fit even a youngster's "allowance" budget. A perfect pick If you can't afford jewels for Mother's Day, these exquisite caramel gems may stand in. Rick Nichols first wrote of these buttery beauties two years ago, but they were unavailable for awhile, while their artisan creator, Christine Moore, was on maternity leave.
NEWS
December 27, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reginald Branham became a computer whiz while at Overbrook High School in the 1980s, earning a four-year scholarship to Drexel University and becoming a computer executive. In recent years, however, he had turned his attention to fixing up bars. On Christmas night, Branham, 37, was shot dead at his latest bar, Cognac Corner in the 1400 block of South 21st Street in Point Breeze, making him the city's 402d homicide victim of the year. Police were not talking about a motive yesterday, but on the street outside the bar, those who said they knew Branham spoke of a possible hit and witness intimidation involving an earlier shooting.
NEWS
March 20, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
By 1987, the time had come to open a bottle of cognac that had sat on a shelf at the American Legion post in Haddonfield since 1940. In 1940, 108 World War I veterans in Post 38 formed a Last Man's Club, with the last survivor to open a bottle of Remy Martin and drink a toast to his departed comrades. Now it is time for another cognac toast, this time to departed World War II veterans. The toast will be raised at the annual Last Man's Dinner - one need not be a Legion member to attend - scheduled for April 4 at Tavistock Country Club.
LIVING
January 16, 2001 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Robinson is drawing my bath. Usually, I do it myself. OK, usually I don't. The words usually and bath don't commingle in the utterances of working mothers except when applied to young children and products adorned with Goofy. The other bath oils, gifts from quixotic friends, gather dust, aging like vintage Bordeaux. When something becomes a rarity in modern life, someone will find a way to charge top dollar for it. Today, you can pay to take a bath. You can pay someone else to do the dirty work.
FOOD
November 1, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Bernard Hine, red-cheeked and mellow from a tasting of his favorite spirits, stood before the crowd of blank faces, smoothed his bushy gray mustache, and decided to begin at the beginning. "What is cognac?" he posed in perfect patrician English, tinged with a lilt of his native French. No response. The waitstaff at a Wilmington restaurant waited anxiously with pens and paper in hand. One waiter straightened his Coca-Cola tie. And so Hine, a sixth-generation descendant of Thomas Hine, the Englishman who founded Hine Cognac when he came to France in 1791, began his seminar by unraveling the secrets of the world's most heralded brandy with a lesson in geography.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Debra Supples Keiser, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Leave the Dramamine home. And most of your makeup, too. For this French-river cruise, what you'll need is a bit of muscle, a spirit of adventure, and a bon appetit. This is no luxury barge; it's a soft-adventure vacation for all who have ever yearned for their own boat - what Crown Blue Line calls "self-skippered cabin cruisers. " You pilot the boat; you determine your itinerary. Your reward is a chance to savor the pristine countryside of France at the laid-back pace of 5 m.p.h.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EVERMORE, EVERMORE, QUOTH THE STEALTHY STRANGER Like a stealthy raven out of a misty night, a mysterious stranger wearing a dark coat and fedora swooped down on the Baltimore grave of Edgar Allan Poe yesterday morning to once again mark the poet's birthday. Four hours after a midnight dreary, the stranger deposited a half-empty bottle of French cognac and three white roses on Poe's headstone. Since 1949, a stranger has marked Poe's birth on Jan. 19, 1809, with a half-bottle of Martell cognac and roses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1994 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And the award for the Breast Presenter at the 66th Oscar fete goes to . . . Miss Geena Davis! Yes, the Cher Apparent did it again, sporting a pale sequined gown that dipped so far southward that even Sherman would have surrendered had he met up with the Amazon goddess. For Supporting Actress, the Oscar goes to Nicole Kidman, encased in a scaly black-sequined number that made her upper torso look half-fish, half (Cruise) missile. And, in a class by herself, there was Dolly.
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