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Cognitive Therapy

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NEWS
July 4, 1994 | By Mary Blakinger, Inquirer Correspondent
Psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck, a pioneer in cognitive therapy, and his daughter, therapist Judith S. Beck, have opened the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research in Suite 700 of the GSB Building in Bala Cynwyd. The nonprofit institute offers training in cognitive therapy and treatment for people with psychological problems ranging from depression to eating disorders, stress, substance abuse and chronic pain. Cognitive therapy, designed to be as short-term as possible, helps people improve their outlook by changing how they perceive situations and respond emotionally to them.
NEWS
September 17, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1960s, University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck began to develop the theories and practice of a new branch of psychoanalysis known as cognitive therapy. Beck's more than 40 years of pioneering work at Penn is being honored today with the prestigious Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research. The Lasker awards are given annually for "stunning" achievements in basic and clinical research in medicine. The awards are often likened to Nobel Prizes and come with a $100,000 honorarium.
NEWS
May 11, 2008 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Had Tony Soprano been under his care, Aaron Beck says he could have cured his panic attacks in two sessions. Bada-bing that, Sigmund Freud. Instead, Dr. Melfi kept the Sopranos mob boss on the couch for years with traditional psychoanalysis, delving into his childhood and deconstructing his dreams. Beck, the University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist who founded the burgeoning field of cognitive therapy, says he and Tony together would have set up short-term goals, then strategized behavior changes to attain them.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fred D. Wright 3d, 47, who taught at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and was director of education at the Center for Cognitive Therapy at Penn, died Friday at his home in Wynnefield Heights. In addition to being assistant professor of counseling psychology at the medical school, Dr. Wright was associate training director for the study of the treatment of cocaine abuse for the cognitive therapy unit. He had been an assistant professor at Penn since 1989 and a member of the staff since 1984.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joan groans to her friend Karen about how her life seems to be in shambles. When Karen offers help, Joan refuses but fears that her friends talk about her behind her back. Is Joan's behavior negative or positive? Select "negative" and you get a congratulatory beep from the Cognitive Therapy Multimedia Learning Program for picking the correct answer. Choose "positive" and be prepared for a droning tone and a chance to pick again. The Beck Institute on City Avenue is the country's first outpatient unit to introduce patients to cognitive therapy via an interactive computer program.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk therapy can work as well as antidepressants in severely depressed people and should also be used as a first line of defense, University of Pennsylvania researchers concluded in a study published yesterday. In a study of 240 patients, researchers found that cognitive therapy, a type of treatment that teaches patients to think more realistically, worked as well as a popular antidepressant for moderate to severe depression. Patients who got four months of cognitive therapy also had about the same relapse rate a year later as people who took Paxil (paroxetine)
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the eminent psychiatrist Aaron Beck, figuring out how to use talk therapy to help people with schizophrenia has been a passion and also a challenge far greater than "working out the structure of depression," the achievement that first brought him fame. Beck, a University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus who is considered a founder of cognitive behavior therapy, has spent years trying to puzzle out why it can be so maddeningly hard to motivate people with schizophrenia and to change their behavior.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Aaron Beck is the Joe Paterno of psychiatry. The University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus known as the father of cognitive therapy still works five days a week, training therapists, supervising researchers, conducting studies, writing scholarly papers and books. Last month, he turned 90, and he has no intention of retiring. "It's not a concept that crosses my mind," he said, "because I'm happy with what I'm doing and there's no need to retire. " Happiness experts say that one of the keys to fulfillment and contentment is to be engaged in meaningful work.
LIVING
November 2, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret began to tremble. Her heart was pounding madly. She broke out in a sweat and began to breathe heavily. "Maybe this time," she thought. "Maybe this time it will kill me. " But it didn't. She lived through this panic attack, but it left her with the realization that she had to do something. She couldn't continue to hide in her "safety zones," to lie to her friends about why she needed them to drive her places, to limit what she could achieve in her career. "I had been suffering panic attacks for two years," she said, "as often as twice a day. Panic, and avoiding panic attacks, were the dominating factors of my life.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judith Beck, a formidable psychologist in her own right, describes her father, the psychiatrist Aaron Beck, with a mixture of amusement and veneration, as a "rock star. " The Becks were the attractions at a fund-raising event last week for their Beck Institute in Bala Cynwyd. But it was clear that the elder Beck, known as the father of cognitive behavior therapy and one of the world's most influential therapists, was the main draw. Before they took the stage at WHYY in Center City to discuss their form of treatment - aimed at changing self-defeating thinking - they met with 70 "patrons" who had paid $250 a ticket for one-on-one access.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
For the last four years, two of the smartest men in town, both titans and respected leaders in their fields, have met monthly for lunch to talk about their work, their lives, and the books they are reading. When Aaron Beck (known to friends as "Tim") and Martin Seligman discuss their professional endeavors, the conversation centers on the mind and how to help people lead lives that are happy, productive and fulfilling. Beck, 92, is a psychiatrist and the father of cognitive therapy, an approach to treating mental illness based on the premise that how you think determines how you feel.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judith Beck, a formidable psychologist in her own right, describes her father, the psychiatrist Aaron Beck, with a mixture of amusement and veneration, as a "rock star. " The Becks were the attractions at a fund-raising event last week for their Beck Institute in Bala Cynwyd. But it was clear that the elder Beck, known as the father of cognitive behavior therapy and one of the world's most influential therapists, was the main draw. Before they took the stage at WHYY in Center City to discuss their form of treatment - aimed at changing self-defeating thinking - they met with 70 "patrons" who had paid $250 a ticket for one-on-one access.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Tanning faces backlash Teenage girls risking deadly melanoma for a year-round tan have helped spur a global backlash against the tanning-bed industry. Health officials from Brasilia to Sydney are banning tanning salons amid evidence that they cause malignant lesions. Tanning-bed use causes all three types of skin cancer, especially for those under age 25, a study from the University of California, San Francisco, said. Doctors say the work in the British Medical Journal should prompt tougher warnings on ultraviolet radiation-emitting tanning machines, which support $5 billion in U.S. annual economic activity.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the eminent psychiatrist Aaron Beck, figuring out how to use talk therapy to help people with schizophrenia has been a passion and also a challenge far greater than "working out the structure of depression," the achievement that first brought him fame. Beck, a University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus who is considered a founder of cognitive behavior therapy, has spent years trying to puzzle out why it can be so maddeningly hard to motivate people with schizophrenia and to change their behavior.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Aaron Beck is the Joe Paterno of psychiatry. The University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus known as the father of cognitive therapy still works five days a week, training therapists, supervising researchers, conducting studies, writing scholarly papers and books. Last month, he turned 90, and he has no intention of retiring. "It's not a concept that crosses my mind," he said, "because I'm happy with what I'm doing and there's no need to retire. " Happiness experts say that one of the keys to fulfillment and contentment is to be engaged in meaningful work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The lights are dimmed in Melody Gardot's Manhattan hotel room. So the sultry-voiced singer, who's been sensitive to light since she was struck by an SUV while riding her bike at Second and Callowhill Streets in 2004, is getting around without her trademark shades. It's the afternoon following Gardot's debut appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman. On television, the blond Philadelphia songwriter looked for all the world like a modern-day Peggy Lee as she scatted and toe-tapped her way through "Who Will Comfort Me" from her sophomore album, My One and Only Thrill (Verve . )
NEWS
March 23, 2009 | By Brian Hickey
Ever since a hit-and-run driver mowed me down in Collingswood on Nov. 28, I've been considered a "patient. " The conversational-English translation of that term is "dramatically injured person at the total mercy of insurance-company whims. " After I was released from inpatient care at Philadelphia's Magee Rehabilitation in January, I was forced to wait more than six weeks for outpatient physical, occupational, and cognitive therapy. For context, more than two weeks of waiting risks regression on all three fronts.
NEWS
May 11, 2008 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Had Tony Soprano been under his care, Aaron Beck says he could have cured his panic attacks in two sessions. Bada-bing that, Sigmund Freud. Instead, Dr. Melfi kept the Sopranos mob boss on the couch for years with traditional psychoanalysis, delving into his childhood and deconstructing his dreams. Beck, the University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist who founded the burgeoning field of cognitive therapy, says he and Tony together would have set up short-term goals, then strategized behavior changes to attain them.
NEWS
September 17, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1960s, University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck began to develop the theories and practice of a new branch of psychoanalysis known as cognitive therapy. Beck's more than 40 years of pioneering work at Penn is being honored today with the prestigious Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research. The Lasker awards are given annually for "stunning" achievements in basic and clinical research in medicine. The awards are often likened to Nobel Prizes and come with a $100,000 honorarium.
NEWS
September 22, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tonight, in a kind of public therapy session, two giants will sit across from each other and talk intimately about something most people try to hide: Mental illness. One is John F. Nash Jr., the brilliant mathematician and Nobel Prize winner whose battle with schizophrenia was the subject of the 2001 movie A Beautiful Mind, starring Russell Crowe. The other is Aaron T. Beck, one of the world's foremost psychotherapists and the originator of cognitive therapy, a practical treatment that focuses on changing distorted or inaccurate beliefs.
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