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Coin Collection

NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Ilene R. Prusher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A nickel usually is worth a clean five cents. Except when it's a rare buffalo nickel, like the 1914 piece Ronald Payne sold to Clark Colborn. Westtown police say the coin is worth about $350, but Payne sold it to Colborn for $2,100. After a 10-month investigation, police arrested Payne, 45, of Newark, Del., on Monday and charged him with deceptive business practices, theft by deception and passing bad checks. Small change it wasn't. That kind of nickel-and-diming cost Colborn, a Westtown businessman, nearly $50,000 and may have gone on for upwards of seven years, police affidavits show.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The robbery victims, all antiques dealers, didn't think much of the apologies and lame excuses offered by Chris Ritter, a longtime flea-market coin seller. The victims, who've known Ritter for years, turned a deaf ear to his claims that he'd been coerced into sending thugs out to rob them because he feared the robbers would kill him and his elderly parents. U.S. District Judge Herbert J. Hutton didn't think much of Ritter's story, either. Hutton yesterday sentenced Ritter, a former Republican committeeman and Bensalem zoning board member, to a 16-year prison term without chance of parole and ordered restitution of $443,130.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The widow of slain Philadelphia Daily News columnist W. Russell G. Byers journeyed to Reynolds School yesterday to present it with books in memory of her husband. But the school's 400 students had a surprise for her also. They gave Laurada Byers a check for $100, representing the "caring coins" they collected last week in Russell Byers' name. The money will be used for an Art Museum landscaping project being done in Byers' memory, restoring the rock garden and hill bordering Kelly Drive.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
At about the same time Donald Trump was cashing a check for 13 cents he received in the mail from a magazine as a refund, I was depositing a check for $5 Texaco sent me for buying five tanks of gas at one of its service stations. My check looked like a postcard. That's how it was sent through the mail, too, address and postage on one side and the check printed on the other so anyone could see it and make jokes about the recipient. I was going to tell one of my kids to run it into the bank while I waited in the car so I wouldn't be embarrassed by trying to deposit a postcard.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
The Thomas Jefferson commemorative silver dollar will go on mail-order sale May 13. It marks the 250th birthday of the third U.S. president. The commemorative seems destined to be one of the U.S. Mint's more popular issues. The coin carries a profile portrait of Jefferson on the obverse and his home, Monticello, on the reverse. The coin is notable for carrying the actual anniversary date, 1993, even though it was struck in 1994. The mint has authorized an edition of 600,000 coins in proof and uncirculated grades.
NEWS
February 19, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
A Burlington County teenager is being held under house arrest at her mother's home after an incident last month in Cinnaminson Township in which she and three adults stole more than $5,000 from a man the girl had lured to a motel, police said. The girl, 16, whose name is not being released by police because of her age, was charged with robbery, criminal restraint and assault. Under terms of the house arrest set by Burlington County Superior Court Judge Anthony P. Tunney Jr., the teenager can leave the Burlington City residence only if accompanied by her mother.
LIVING
August 2, 1987 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
William Beaver Chamberlin was a prominent Philadelphia coal dealer, but coin collectors knew him as penny-wise. On his death in 1942, he left a collection of cents that included at least one of every date from 1793 to 1917, all chosen for their high grades. His collection, which has been in the hands of his heirs for 45 years, will be auctioned Wednesday at Harmer Rooke Numismatists Ltd. in New York City. According to Michael Toledo of the auction house, the Chamberlin cents will make up 182 of the 700 lots of coins to be sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1987 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
"When I wear heels, I loom," says Mary Lou Bateson, formerly of Des Moines, presently of New York City. Figures. She's almost 6-foot-2 in her bare feet, which is why she has the nickname "Dunk. " As in basketball. For three years, she has worked for Enoch Wottle, who deals in the buying and selling of old coins. But Enoch, himself old, gives up his business when his entire block is condemned. He goes off to live in Arizona with his son. Dunk gets a job with Grandby & Sons, which is when her Grand Adventure begins and The Eighth Commandment by Lawrence Sanders (Berkley, $4.95)
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
The sale of Floyd T. Starr's coin collection, called "The Philadelphia Estate," brought $6,237,400 at a sale in New York City. Starr, a noted Philadelphia collector who died in 1971, had collected coins known as reference examples, coins of such fine quality that scholars examined and used them as illustrations in books. The top price, $160,000, was paid for a 1884 trade dollar in proof condition. A 1933 gold $10 coin in top uncirculated condition brought $120,000, and an 1855 gold proof dollar brought $105,000.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "buffalo" of David Mamet's American Buffalo is a nickel, a coin in a collection that a pair of petty thieves is planning to steal. Mamet, however, means his play to have much broader significance than small-change criminals plotting a 5-cent caper. These thieves don't view themselves as criminals. They consider themselves businessmen. They talk like businessmen, and they view the crime as a profit- making venture. Set in a junk shop, the play is a comment on the cynicism and amorality of American business ethics as Mamet sees them being practiced.
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