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Cold Cuts

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NEWS
March 18, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Buffet Froid" is French for cold cuts. That's about the only definite thing I can tell you about this new dark comedy by Bertrand Blier, the director of "Going Places," "Get Out Your Handkerchiefs," "Menage" and numerous other more accessible films. A deserted subway station. A stocky man in a coat (Gerard Depardieu), whose name turns out to be Alphonse Tram, assails a nervous accountant, confessing that he has unnerving fantasies about killing people. As if to prove his point, he pulls out his knife.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1989 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Something seems amiss. Here is Susan Fletcher, high-flying daughter of former Eagles owner Leonard Tose, the team's former vice president and legal counsel, a blonde-on-blonde vision in her sequined white sweater and silver jewelry. But outside the window is gritty Pennsauken, not the lush green of Veterans Stadium. And what's this? Fletcher is running a polished fingernail along . . . a slab of ham? Strange, but true. Fletcher, once a step away from the rarefied circle of NFL ownership, has traded the silver-winged helmet for the hard hat and butcher smock.
FOOD
February 6, 1991 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
OSCAR MAYER THIN SLICED COLD CUTS. Boiled ham, honey ham, roast beef, roast chicken breast and roast turkey breast. 98 cents per 2-ounce bag or $2.25 per 6-ounce bag. BONNIE: Cold cuts are traditionally high-fat foods, containing up to 85 percent of their calories from fat. These new meats from Oscar Mayer are not only sliced thin, but are also lower in fat than traditional cold cuts. But they should not be confused with low-fat foods. These cold cuts are 94 percent fat-free by weight but only 73 percent fat- free in terms of calories from fat (the more traditional way to measure such things)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Germany, probably more than any other country on the planet, is hellbent on quality. This ranges from cars to cutlery to even the spartan yet satisfying sandwiches served at both breakfast and lunch. Take heavy, dark rye bread, some cold cuts and maybe a slice of cheese or a dab of mustard, and you've got the classic German sandwich. Don't even think about mayonnaise or butter, says Walter Rieker, co-owner of Rieker's Prime Meats, 7979 Oxford Ave. (215-745-3114) in Fox Chase, where nearly all the meat cold cuts and sausages are made and smoked on the premises.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | By Kevin McKinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ralph Principe wants to know what somebody's done with his 600 pounds of mozzarella cheese. The cheese is missing from Principe's pizza shop in Chester County, along with 60 pounds of pepperoni and a 300-pound meat slicer, police said yesterday. The Great Cheese Heist was Friday. "If I gave you 600 pounds of mozzarella cheese, what would you do with it?" asked Principe, who last month opened Marco's Pizza along Route 100 in Exton. "You wouldn't take it. You wouldn't know what to do with it. " The bewildered Principe, 69, thought he had seen it all at his last pizza shop, which he ran in the Olney section of Philadelphia for nine years.
FOOD
January 24, 1996 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you don't want to wait in line to order a deli platter at your local Acme, hop online for a shortcut to the cold cuts. The virtual supermarket, or at least the deli counter, has arrived as a stop on the information highway. "It's a new medium. We thought we should be there," said Edwin Spragg, vice president of advertising for Malvern-based Acme Markets, which put up its own World Wide Web page last month, hoping to attract sales. Although Acme's not the first grocery chain to go virtual (others include Kroger and Winn Dixie)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
It was impressive. After a 12-story elevator ride, diners relaxed in cushioned wicker chairs. The clatter of their dinnerware evaporated into the vast, handsome quadrangle. Sharply attired servers moved gracefully. They nodded, smiled and did their best to pamper the patrons. On the north side of this giant, cream-and-green courtyard, a guest of the Hotel Atop the Bellevue peered down from his balcony perch several floors above. Below him was the Conservatory restaurant, a striking architectural structure that brings to mind this decade's version of the great gallerias of Italy.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Who ever thought we would be glad to see Stevie Nicks again? Well, for starters, the half-million record-buyers who helped Nicks' Trouble in Shangri-la go gold. They were probably pretty happy - until they got it home and listened to it. Then, the righteous-babe rockers such as Sheryl Crow and Courtney Love, who see the former Fleetwood Mac frontwoman as some kind of fairy godmother of chick-rock. And the mothers and daughters who frolicked on the Tweeter Center lawn Tuesday night, twirling barefoot in long summer dresses to Nicks' witchy-woman music.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
To cut salt, lose the cold cuts Americans can dramatically reduce their daily salt intake by cutting bread, cold cuts, and cured meats in their diet, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Limiting condiments and reading nutrition labels are other ways to kick a high-sodium habit, the experts noted. They also said people can change their palate and enjoy foods with less salt in just 21 days. The heart and stroke experts are launching a three-week Sodium Swap Challenge Monday.
FOOD
May 10, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Yes, indeed, folks, it's that time again. Have you sent a card? Flowers? Chocolates? Made a phone call? She may say, "Oh, phooey, it's all commercial hype. I don't care about such things. " But in your heart, you know your mother is hoping to hear some platitude today. And why not? Aside from her many other contributions, this is a person who fed you for years and years. As it happens, there is lately a flurry of interest in those very eats. It's even being called "Mommy Food" - when it is not being called "Comfort Food.
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NEWS
January 7, 2013
To cut salt, lose the cold cuts Americans can dramatically reduce their daily salt intake by cutting bread, cold cuts, and cured meats in their diet, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Limiting condiments and reading nutrition labels are other ways to kick a high-sodium habit, the experts noted. They also said people can change their palate and enjoy foods with less salt in just 21 days. The heart and stroke experts are launching a three-week Sodium Swap Challenge Monday.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Who ever thought we would be glad to see Stevie Nicks again? Well, for starters, the half-million record-buyers who helped Nicks' Trouble in Shangri-la go gold. They were probably pretty happy - until they got it home and listened to it. Then, the righteous-babe rockers such as Sheryl Crow and Courtney Love, who see the former Fleetwood Mac frontwoman as some kind of fairy godmother of chick-rock. And the mothers and daughters who frolicked on the Tweeter Center lawn Tuesday night, twirling barefoot in long summer dresses to Nicks' witchy-woman music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Germany, probably more than any other country on the planet, is hellbent on quality. This ranges from cars to cutlery to even the spartan yet satisfying sandwiches served at both breakfast and lunch. Take heavy, dark rye bread, some cold cuts and maybe a slice of cheese or a dab of mustard, and you've got the classic German sandwich. Don't even think about mayonnaise or butter, says Walter Rieker, co-owner of Rieker's Prime Meats, 7979 Oxford Ave. (215-745-3114) in Fox Chase, where nearly all the meat cold cuts and sausages are made and smoked on the premises.
FOOD
November 29, 2000 | by Kent Steinriede, For the Daily News
Overspending, gridlock traffic, cooking for hordes - welcome to the holiday season. It's party time whether you are in the mood or not. But there's also relief. One of the easiest ways to take a load off when entertaining this time of year is to leave it to the professionals. Call a caterer. You better do it fast, though, because the end-of-the-year holidays are the busiest time for these professional party-makers. Never hired a caterer before? Using one for a small party is much less complicated than planning a wedding, which is when most people think of caterers.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's still an unsettling sight, even for a man who has been a butcher all his life. So Jack Foresta, 70, still winces a little when he steps over the dark red stain on the sidewalk leading to the walk-in cooler outside his meat market. Inside, the view isn't any softer. More than 30 deer hang from their haunches. One is spread out waiting to be cleaned. Fifteen deer heads piled in the far right corner create a collage of glossy eyes, open mouths and antlers. Eventually, a few of the heads will be mounted on living-room walls.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan and Angela Galloway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Arlen Specter strolled down from his swank suite of rooms at the Ritz-Carlton last night and into the ballroom, where he was greeted by the cheers of hundreds of supporters chanting "Six more years. " "I thank the people of Pennsylvania for this mandate," the 68-year-old moderate Republican, an 18-year veteran of the Senate, said as his wife, Joan, and his family stood with him. "The Constitution talks about 'We, the people,' and that is where the power in America resides. " With his lopsided victory, Specter, who showed no signs of being slowed by the heart-bypass surgery he underwent in June, became the first Pennsylvania senator elected to four terms.
FOOD
January 24, 1996 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you don't want to wait in line to order a deli platter at your local Acme, hop online for a shortcut to the cold cuts. The virtual supermarket, or at least the deli counter, has arrived as a stop on the information highway. "It's a new medium. We thought we should be there," said Edwin Spragg, vice president of advertising for Malvern-based Acme Markets, which put up its own World Wide Web page last month, hoping to attract sales. Although Acme's not the first grocery chain to go virtual (others include Kroger and Winn Dixie)
BUSINESS
June 26, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, FOR THE INQUIRER
Bill Hubbs can maneuver a propeller plane through thunderous rain and the most volatile weather. He can design a computer program to help corporate managers serve thousands of customers annually. He has picked up Cuban refugees from waters off Miami, and he has trained young computer programmers on the job. But three years ago, at age 48, what Bill Hubbs couldn't do was find a job. He was laid off from his middle-management position as a systems designer with Cigna Corp. So today, Hubbs, a former Coast Guard search-and-rescue pilot and business graduate of Southern Illinois University, is a Wawa management trainee - earning about $35,000 less than he made three years ago, learning how to make a deli sandwich.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1995 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
At least eight attorneys bellied up to the bar before U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge David A. Scholl yesterday, but they represented only a handful of the creditors seeking payback from cousins Jerry and Steven Cohen. Jerry Cohen filed for creditor protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code last fall, saying he owed more than $10 million. The case was initially filed in Tampa, Fla., but was moved to Philadelphia in January at the request of the U.S. Bankruptcy Trustee.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John and Letitia Fletcher are trying to hold out, playing Scrooge with their furnace. They are using their gas stove to help out, hoping they can make the heating oil at their North Philadelphia home last until mid-January, when federal crisis heating-assistance dollars become available. John Fletcher is a heart-transplant recipient, and Letitia worries that he'll get pneumonia. But they've had to make a hard choice: Either use a little bit of heat, and never get completely warm, until things get better.
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