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Cold Turkey

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SPORTS
April 8, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Curt Schilling picked up the newspapers yesterday morning and read Mets righthander Pete Harnisch was physically unable to make his scheduled start Sunday against the Giants at 3Com Park. Harnisch told team officials he couldn't make his start because of the effects related to his quitting smokeless tobacco during spring training. The Mets placed him on the 15-day disabled list yesterday. The story was a double whammy for the Phillies' ace. One, Harnisch is a close friend from their days as Houston Astros teammates.
NEWS
November 26, 1999 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Debora Kodish had it all planned - up at 6 a.m., turkey in the oven by 8 a.m. Thanksgiving dinner would be on the table by the afternoon. It was not to be - exactly. But a double dose of power outages in a West Philadelphia neighborhood could not hold back Thanksgiving, as residents scrambled to make the most of their holiday. With the big turkey cooling off in the oven, Kodish and her husband had to take action. So they packed up Thanksgiving in cardboard boxes and Tupperware bowls and climbed in the car. Then, with two kids in tow, it was over the Schuylkill and through Center City to grandfather's apartment we go. "It was great," Kodish said after dinner there.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | BY LOU CANNON
The silence of one hand clapping has greeted the big deficit-reduction bombshell dropped last week by House Ways and Means Committee chairman Dan Rostenkowski. You remember Rosty. He fills the television screen - very shrewd, very political, very Chicago. He was a ward committeeman in the 8th congressional district in Chicago when he was first elected to the House in 1958. He still keeps his local party post in a city where all politics is local. Rosty has it easy these days.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Ira Porter and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Temple University student shot last week inside his off-campus apartment has died of his injury, police said yesterday. Bryan Yeshion, 21, of Doylestown, was pronounced dead of a gunshot wound to the neck at 1:32 a.m. Sunday at Temple University Hospital, investigators said. Police said he was shot around 12:15 p.m. Friday inside his third-floor apartment in the 1400 block of West Diamond Street in North Philadelphia. Investigators said it appeared Yeshion had been shot during an argument.
SPORTS
June 30, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
After pitching a complete game against Pittsburgh April 21, Curt Schilling swore off strikeouts. Said he was going cold turkey. His new plan, he said, was to rely on his defense and throw fewer pitches. That plan disappeared quicker than the Phillies lead in the sixth inning yesterday. Schilling has pitched a total of 12 2/3 innings in his last two starts while striking out 25. He leads the National League with 151. This isn't necessarily a good thing, however. For example, he gave up 16 home runs in 183 1/3 innings all last year.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Steve Joseph of Voorhees, an attorney and real estate developer, started smoking at 16. By 38, he had been through hypnosis, two nicotine patches, acupuncture, one heart attack, and a close call with death. On the way home from the hospital after the heart attack, he stopped off at a convenience store to pick up . . . a pack of cigarettes. "I couldn't wait to smoke again," he said. He continued to go through two packs a day. Then February 6 arrived. "I had a pain, and I went to the hospital, had a quadrupal bypass, and lived to tell about it," Joseph, 41, recalled.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the Smokers Choice tobacco shop Thursday, clean, sweet-smelling air filled the aisles of cigarette cartons. Owner Nick Trub spent most of his day behind the bulletproof window cashing paychecks at the store, 9961 Bustleton Ave. His employees stood around arranging packs of cigarettes, tobacco pouches, pipes and cigars. Business, it seems, was rather lousy on this day of the 13th annual Great American Smokeout, when smokers were to trade in their butts for candy and gum in an effort to kick the habit.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
Inside the CoreStates Center last night, the adjectives were flying faster than Flyers skates. The brutal thing is the Philadelphia fans weren't cursing the Detroit Red Wings - or even the enemy fans brave enough to invade Flyers territory in blood-red jerseys. They were cursing the home team. Yes, Wings fans got the typical City-of-Brotherly-Love welcome - they were elbowed, spit at, jeered at, beered at. But as some Detroit hockey fans pointed out, by game's end, Flyers fans were probably cheering more for the little Zamboni from Detroit.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | Compiled from Inquirer wire services
WHAT COULD BE WORSE? NO CHOCOLATES? NO CARDS? If you wait for Valentine's Day to stop and smell the roses, there may be a thorny problem - no roses. A freeze late last year in Colombia, which exports about 55 percent of all cut roses sold in the United States, makes the possibility of a rose shortage "very real," according to Roses Inc., a Haslett, Mich., trade association for U.S. and Canadian greenhouse rose growers. "Some major Colombian producers have been sending communiques saying they may not be able to fill orders and they should start looking for alternative sources," a spokesman said.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Magic Johnson is talking about the problems of his recently canceled late-night talk show, but strangely, we don't hear anything about what a crummy host he was. Apparently, it's a race thing. "We all have to support each other, and we don't do that," Johnson complained to syndicated radio interviewer Lee Bailey. "Black stars think that if they're not on Leno or Letterman, then they're not making it. "That's the problem. Their managers and agents keep them off of the black shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: After several years of really bad behavior (drinking too much, sleeping with several married men and general promiscuity, dabbling in drug use, and generally not being a good person), about six months ago, I finally managed to stop all of this cold turkey. I can't make up for what I did, but I plan to spend the rest of my life working to be a better person and making better choices that don't hurt people, one day at a time, of course.
NEWS
November 19, 2011
The Obama administration needs to live up to its promise to reduce meat and poultry producers' overuse of antibiotics, which has been linked to the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections among humans. Leading health experts believe that new guidelines are needed to protect consumers from difficult-to-treat illnesses that have been increasing at an alarming rate. Farmers routinely give antibiotics to hogs, cattle, poultry, and other animals to treat illnesses, prevent infection, and to spur the animals' growth while giving them less feed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
D AILY NEWS readers really identified with last week's column on my personal struggles with sugar addiction. Specifically, inquiring minds wanted to know precisely what I did to overcome, or should I say "manage," my addiction to the sweet stuff. Well, here are the juicy details. Initially, I gave up sugar COLD TURKEY - the same way I gave up cigarettes! Surprised? That's right, I was a cigarette smoker. Generations of women smoked in my family, so quite naturally I took up this bad habit, too. Despite the warning on the label, I was convinced in my youth that there must be something wonderful about smoking - otherwise, why would my mother and grandmother be doing it?
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
The e-mail directed us to come to the training session armed with our new cell phones and computers, prepared to start a revolution. Well, not actually. But our instructor did remind us that the first pictures from the late January uprisings in Egypt were taken by a photojournalist using nothing more than a smartphone - photos that changed the world. For an old-school scribe honed on pens, dimes, and notebooks, it's dizzying to think that I can write, text, tweet, Skype, video, photograph, listen to the police scanner - oh, and talk, too - all on a single device.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
On vacation last week I checked into a rustic lodge while hiking in the mountains ("Valderi, valdera") and was immediately struck with a sense of foreboding. It took me a few seconds to realize what was wrong: no television. I began tearing the cabin apart looking for hidden consoles. Come on, people. This is the 21st century. How can there be a hotel room without a TV set? There are pencils that get 70 channels. Five minutes after my fruitless search, I was curled up in a fetal position on the floor, trembling and tearfully singing the theme song to The Courtship of Eddie's Father to comfort myself.
NEWS
November 19, 2007 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Tarducci has tried to quit smoking many times over the last 25 years. He's gone cold turkey, slapped on the patch, even taken antidepressants. Nothing worked. On June 23 he tried again, this time with a powerful new aid: Chantix - the antismoking medicine that was approved for sale in the United States 18 months ago. Today, the 45-year-old South Philadelphian considers himself an ex-smoker, and he credits the drug with enabling him to kick his more-than-a-pack-a-day habit.
NEWS
September 27, 2006
WE HAVE TO ADMIT to being a little amused by the outrage that met Mayor Street's surprise announcement that the smoking ban was going into effect at the beginning of this week, 11 days after he finally signed it. The irony is that for the last year, much of the city - Council members, anti-smoking advocates, restaurant patrons and others - have been drumming their fingers on the bar, waiting for some movement on the bill that would finally ban...
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Ira Porter and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Temple University student shot last week inside his off-campus apartment has died of his injury, police said yesterday. Bryan Yeshion, 21, of Doylestown, was pronounced dead of a gunshot wound to the neck at 1:32 a.m. Sunday at Temple University Hospital, investigators said. Police said he was shot around 12:15 p.m. Friday inside his third-floor apartment in the 1400 block of West Diamond Street in North Philadelphia. Investigators said it appeared Yeshion had been shot during an argument.
NEWS
March 12, 2005 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In North Miami, Fla., smokers had a bad reputation. They were less productive than nonsmokers and got sick more often, the city argued. So the city locked them out of government jobs, just as Montgomery County is considering doing now. Yet two years ago, North Miami quit its 13-year nonsmoker habit cold turkey when it realized that those nasty smokers made decent cops. "We had a real hard time recruiting," said Rebecca Jones, North Miami's director of personnel administration.
NEWS
December 29, 2004 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the choppy waters of the Atlantic on Christmas morning, Jarvis Fox, a veteran sailor from Chester County, was trying to steer clear of an advancing storm when he lost control of his 46-foot sailboat. "The boat was doing terrific, and then, for a reason unbeknownst to us, the rudder popped off," Fox, 64, a retired Conrail executive who lives in Chester Springs, said yesterday by phone near Hatteras, N.C. Fox, his wife Elke, 64, nephew, Manfred Goings, 48, and the couple's Siamese cat, Tyke, spent most of the day being tossed around at sea 35 miles off the coast of North Carolina.
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