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Cold War

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NEWS
March 20, 2006 | By Donald H. Rumsfeld
I recently spoke at the library and birthplace of President Harry S. Truman to reflect on his leadership in the early days of the Cold War and to consider what lessons might apply to another - and in many ways very different - struggle that could occupy our country for a good many years ahead. With the perspective of history, the many new institutions and programs of the Truman years - such as the doctrine of containment, the Marshall Plan, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization - can seem as part of a broadly supported strategy that led to what now almost seems like an inevitable victory in the Cold War. But, of course, things didn't unfold that way. Our country was tired after the Second World War, and strong strains of isolationism still persisted.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Director Elia Kazan and playwright Arthur Miller were colleagues, friends and titans of 20th-century theater. With plays such as Death of a Salesman (which Kazan directed and Miller wrote), they redefined American drama, bringing heat and realism to the stage. But then came the Cold War and Kazan's cooperation with the House Un-American Activities Committee. While Kazan named names of Communist Party members, Miller refused to cooperate and didn't speak to Kazan for a decade. This created difficulties for their intimates, among them Miller's wife Marilyn Monroe, who had once been Kazan's mistress.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
John Frankenheimer's The Manchurian Candidate (1962), a startlingly fine adaptation of Richard Condon's part political satire, part paranoid prophecy, stealthily made its way into movie theaters months before the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It stars an implosive Frank Sinatra doing his best work as Maj. Bennett Marco, a Korean War vet tormented by the recurrent nightmare that under Communist directive, his Army buddy Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey) is out to assassinate the men in his platoon.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | BY BUD SHUSTER, From the New York Times
Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan's effort to abolish the CIA and transfer its functions to the State Department is a recipe for disaster. Giving the secretary of state the responsibility for intelligence raises the specter of "cooking" intelligence to support a preconceived policy. As Dave Durenberger, ex-chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said: "There's danger when your eyes and ears become your brain. You start seeing what you want to see. " Moynihan is using his bill to promote certain theories.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You probably don't remember Ronald Reagan's grizzly bear. It lumbered across your TV screen in 1984. It was a canny metaphor for the Cold War - brought to you by the same folks who had created ads for Gallo Wines and Meow Mix. There it was, two months before Election Day, trudging along a hilltop. The narrator intoned: "For some people, the bear is easy to see. Others don't see it at all. Some people say the bear is tame. Others say it's vicious and dangerous. Since no one can really be sure who's right, isn't it smart to be as strong as the bear?"
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | By JESSICA MATHEWS
A recent report by a presidentially appointed panel of experts supports the surprising conclusion that the country's space program is an unexpected casualty of the end of the Cold War. NASA's public woes, from Challenger to Hubble, were less on the panel's mind than the space agency's long drift in search of a mission and its symptoms of what Robert M. White, president of the National Academy of Engineering, calls "an acute case of giantism....
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | By W. CURTIS THOMAS
THANKS TO the Daily News for your recent editorial on utility bills ("The Cold War Begins Again," Nov. 26) - but you missed the point. The "cold war" is not beginning. It was never over. The real issue is fairness. House Bill 824 is not about derailing Act 201. It's about striking a balance between the interests of consumers and utility companies. Since passage of Act 201 in 2004, PGW, PECO and utility companies statewide have enjoyed several rate increases. Unfortunately, these increases have occurred at a time when the salaries of moderate-, middle- and low-income workers have remained flat.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cold War in Europe may or may not be over just yet. But it seems to be ending. And some experts miss it already. They say the day may come when the world looks back on the 40 years after World War II as the good old days - when life was simple, people knew which side they were on and a standoff between superpowers kept the peace. "We are witnessing the loss of our tidy little world," Josef Joffe, foreign editor of Suddeutsche Zeitung, the largest newspaper in West Germany, said here last week at a conference on The Changing Face of Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Hunt for Red October" is a happy cinematic event, the first motion picture that allows us to experience the sweaty-palm thrills of the Cold War without worrying that the world will blow up this year. The movie is an entertaining journey back to the days of mutually assured destruction, nuclear winters and scowling Soviet dictators who always died of colds. Now, with bits of the pulverized Berlin Wall in the hands of greedy entrepreneurs and Big Mac wrappers blowing around Red Square, everybody is concentrating on more important things, like getting their cut of the peace dividend.
LIVING
January 30, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As befitting his action-adventure novels, Nelson DeMille is a two-fisted writer, scrawling his words on yellow legal pads with a No. 1 pencil in his right hand while using his left hand to wield a cup of java, smoke a cigarette, or even consult a reference book. And his latest, The Lion's Game (Warner Books, $26.95), is a testament not only to his great storytelling skills but also to his superb attention to detail. The Lion's Game is an incredibly fast-paced thriller (especially remarkable considering its 677 pages)
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NEWS
September 12, 2016
John Yoo is a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a former Justice Department official, and coeditor of "Liberty's Nemesis: The Unchecked Expansion of the State" Children born on Sept. 11, 2001, will turn 15 today. They will not have known the world before three hijacked airliners crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing 3,000, and before brave passengers brought a fourth airliner down in a Pennsylvania field rather than let it crash into the Capitol or White House.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
The Russians have just given us an August glimpse of a potential October surprise. We learned earlier this summer that cyber-hackers widely believed to be tied to the Kremlin have broken into the email of the Democratic National Committee and others. The Washington Post's Ellen Nakashima reported Monday night that Russian hackers have also been targeting state voter-registration systems. And, in an apparent effort to boost Donald Trump's presidential candidacy, they're leaking what they believe to be the most damaging documents at strategic points in the campaign.
NEWS
August 25, 2016
By James Jay Carafano Donald Trump wants NATO members to pay their fair share into the transatlantic alliance, and that idea is not new. Since the end of the Cold War, every American administration has made the same demand. And it's still a bipartisan stance. Leaders and candidates in both parties - from Bernie Sanders to Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.) - have called for NATO members to put more skin in the mutual defense game. Some of our allies have done just that.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
By Christopher Preble and Emma Ashford In October, America's longest war, the war in Afghanistan, will enter its 16th year. With American troops fighting not only in Afghanistan but in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and elsewhere, foreign policy should be a major topic of discussion during the Democratic National Convention and overall this election year. Unfortunately, neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump advocates a foreign policy that the American people want. Trump can certainly be credited with shaking up the foreign policy debate during the primary season.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
'The most significant reinforcement of our collective defense any time since the Cold War," President Obama called it. A bit of an exaggeration, perhaps, but it was still an achievement: Last week's NATO summit in Warsaw ordered the deployment of troops to Eastern Europe, the alliance's most serious response yet to Russia's aggression and provocations on its western frontier. The post-Ukraine economic sanctions have been weak; the declamatory denunciations, a mere embarrassment. They've only encouraged further reckless Russian behavior - the buzzing of U.S. ships, intrusions into European waters, threats to the Baltic States.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In the early 1990s, after the collapse of the Soviet empire, most Western nations basked in the illusion that liberal democracy had triumphed. Many thought NATO had become an anachronism in an era of permanent European peace. Some countries freed from Kremlin control, including tiny Estonia, knew better. Only 21/2 decades later, the European Union teeters and populism thrives - on both sides of the Atlantic. A revanchist Russia bent on restoring past glory makes nuclear threats against members of the NATO alliance.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
FX is giving Reagan-era Russian spies Philip and Elizabeth Jennings (Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell) a final two seasons to win one for the U.S.S.R. in The Americans . The show currently runs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
Though The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming! was mediocre, that 1966 film's title perfectly reflected America's Cold War hysteria. We were convinced the Russians were coming. That's why the period gave rise to duck-and-cover, bomb shelters, and the widespread use of anxiety medication. Personally, all that anti-Soviet mania was so terrifying that I had persistent nightmares about communist invaders pouring through the gap between two neighboring homes on Carlton Drive and laying siege to our split-level.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
A Russian Mi-28 helicopter crashed in Syria Tuesday, according to a statement by the Russian Ministry of Defense. Its two crew members were killed, and the aircraft was said to have crashed because of technical reasons. Reports on social media indicated that the helicopter, known in Russia as the Mi-28 Night Hunter and among NATO countries as the Havoc, is an advanced gunship that appears to have first arrived in Syria in November but has only recently been used extensively in combat.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
An Inside History of the American Presidency By David Greenberg W.W. Norton. 640 pp., $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow 'In public life it is sometimes necessary, in order to appear really natural, to be actually artificial. " Which 20th-century American president made the above statement? In the highly unlikely event you knew it was Calvin Coolidge, count yourself a scholar of spin. If not, you might find Republic of Spin , David Greenberg's account of presidents and their spinmeisters, enlightening.
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