CollectionsCole Hamels
IN THE NEWS

Cole Hamels

SPORTS
August 29, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fourth time in less than two weeks, Ryne Sandberg felt it necessary to engage one of his players in a private chat regarding a perceived slight against the first-year Phillies manager. He sought Cole Hamels, who pouted when removed from Tuesday's game at 84 pitches and issued a calculated message afterward. On Wednesday, Sandberg diffused the situation with his talk. "It was brief," Sandberg said. "It wasn't a big deal. " This one instance was not. The pattern of clubhouse unrest, however, is alarming.
SPORTS
August 28, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE INNING began with Cole Hamels serving up a game-tying home run, being greeted by his manager, and handing the ball over with nary a word or even eye contact. It ended with the rookie reliever hopping off the same mound in celebration, after striking out all three hitters he faced on 13 pitches. The score remained the same, but a game Hamels had owned for six innings was suddenly going Washington's way, before Ken Giles entered and quieted the Nats' bats. Giles' latest dominating performance awakened the sleepy crowd at Citizens Bank Park.
SPORTS
August 28, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The presence of Gio Gonzalez, a difficult Nationals lefthander, prompted Ryne Sandberg to adopt a different approach in Tuesday night's 4-3 Phillies win at Citizens Bank Park. The manager ditched Monday's lineup, which he used in 14 of the season's first 131 games, and inserted four new names. Freddy Galvis played second base for his first major-league start since May 8; he crushed a Gonzalez chest-high fastball for a two-run homer in the fifth inning. Darin Ruf started for the third time in 10 games; he smashed a Gonzalez fastball for a solo home run in the sixth.
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
LAST WEEK, A.J. Burnett said he was "probably" going to retire after the season. It wasn't exactly a surprising development, since Burnett spent the first three months of last offseason thinking along the same lines. But after delivering his first stellar start in more than a month on Monday night, Burnett's words from a week ago are somewhat relevant. Burnett tossed five zeros on the board for the first five innings against a very talented team in leading the Phillies to a 3-2 victory.
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
BEFORE THE well-deserved inductions of Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine into the Baseball Hall of Fame last month, an old, familiar advertisement from 1998 made the rounds on the various social-media platforms of the day. "Chicks dig the long ball" was a Nike campaign that took off, thanks, in large part, to the deadpan deliveries of the two everyman-looking Cy Young arms, who, after watching women fawn over the batting-practice blasts of Mark McGwire,...
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
A.J. Burnett's two sons, Allan Jr. and Ashton, scampered through the Phillies clubhouse Monday night with Nerf guns. They shot rubber darts to celebrate their dad's 3-2 win over Washington, and Burnett's dilemma manifested. The last 16 summers were spent away from his family; retirement could tempt him. "I have some options for next year, of course," Burnett said. "But I signed a one-year deal for a reason. Those little rug rats you saw running around here and Karen, my wife, there is a big reason for that.
SPORTS
August 26, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies will use the final 32 games to find solutions, and they must know every revelation cannot be franchise-altering. A team on pace for 90 losses will improve in slow (sometimes painful) increments. That elevates a 32-year-old waiver claim with three quality starts against three contenders to exalted status. This summer, two of the worst teams in baseball jettisoned Jerome Williams. He has carved a successful home in the Phillies rotation, with eight more innings in a 7-1 win over St. Louis as the latest evidence.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
AS THE Philadelphia region prepared itself for the main event of the day's sporting schedule, a Little League game played out during a long inning at Citizens Bank Park on yesterday afternoon. And not of the high-caliber kind that's being played this week in Williamsport. More of the endless, error-filled brand of ball found at your local recreation league fields each weekend in the spring. The fourth inning of a matinee between the Phillies and Seattle Mariners featured a wild pitch, a passed ball, two errors, Cole Hamels' pitch count nearing 90, and one baserunner caught between third and home when his teammate missed a bunt sign.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Ryne Sandberg came to the postgame podium Wednesday wearing a Little League shirt and hat - a homage to the Mid-Atlantic champion Taney team from Philadelphia. It was certainly a nice gesture, but feel free to insert your own punch line about that not being much different from any other day during this lost season. "We all played Little League. It's getting back to the basics of baseball," Sandberg said after the Phillies slipped past the Mariners, 4-3. The basics of baseball were nowhere to be found in Citizens Bank Park on Wednesday, however, as the teams combined for two errors, three wild pitches, a passed ball, a botched suicide squeeze, and a bunch of catches in the outfield that looked like magic tricks.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cole Hamels lingered in the on-deck circle Wednesday as Seattle reliever Tom Wilhelmsen tossed four intentional balls to Andres Blanco. It was the fifth inning, and Hamels knew this ended his uninspired afternoon. He dangled his bat in disappointment. Jake Diekman warmed in the bullpen. Later, after a 4-3 Phillies win over Seattle at Citizens Bank Park, the 27-year-old lefthanded reliever recalled how bleak his practice throws were. He could not control the baseball. "I was panicking," Diekman said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|