CollectionsColeslaw
IN THE NEWS

Coleslaw

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
July 6, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Culinary logic and an appreciation for the appropriate suggest that coleslaw should be a winter specialty, winter being the season when cabbage is at its best. But as soon as swift shipping and cold storage made it a summer possibility, custom made it a summer staple, and though slaw is actually a salad that knows no season, it's a safe bet that far more of it will be forked down on Memorial Day, the Fourth of July and Labor Day than was ever consumed on a Christmas Day. The incongruity of the cabbage aside, this makes a lot of sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
May we put in a good word for pepper hash, handmaiden of the fish cake, stand-in for the pricey lemon (in Victorian times), friend of the workingman - on the verge now of culinary extinction in a Philadelphia where ho-hum coleslaws, chow chows, and that tart cherry-pepper hoagie relish seem to be coasting just fine, riding free and easy. Is there no justice? Sweet pepper hash has more than earned a place at the table where for most of the city's existence it was a fixture. "Fish cooks paired it up with fried oysters, soft-shell crabs, codfish balls, shad fritters, and grilled catfish," historian William Woys Weaver recounts, noting its perfect attendance at catfish suppers once prevalent hereabouts.
FOOD
March 7, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the great things about cabbage is that it's available year-round. It's also easy to grow and has a long shelf life. One drawback - to some cooks - is the pungent odor associated with cabbage, a drawback that's easily dealt with. Overcooking is usually the reason for the strong cabbage aroma. If cabbage is cooked quickly, the strong smell will not only be avoided, but the finished product will be crunchy and retain more of its vitamins. The key to fast cooking is shredding the cabbage.
SPORTS
July 8, 2013
Tip of the Week   Summer eating Barbecues are a great part of summer. Here are some tips about what to eat and what not to eat: Don't eat . . . ribs. They are one of the worst foods on the menu because they are much higher in fat than they are in protein. If you have a craving for ribs, make them baby back as opposed to spare ribs. Eat . . . grilled or rotisserie chicken (sans skin). This is the best entree because it is loaded with lean protein, which also helps you feel fuller longer so you don't munch on excess calories.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012
Outlet: PBR Bar & Grill at Xfinity Live! We went: Pregame, 5:45 p.m. Wait: None. Order: Slow-smoked ribs. Cost: $14. Phindings: Looking for a change of scene, the Pharaoh of Phoodelphia decided to taste-test Xfinity Live!, the mega-food court that now occupies the site of the beloved Spectrum. For the first of several cross-Pattison-Avenue excursions to be undertaken this season, PP settled on the PBR Bar & Grill, which stands for Professional Bull Riders, not the downscale beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon.
FOOD
December 13, 2012
Deb Perelman, author of the popular cooking blog "smittenkitchen," was at the Free Library of Philadelphia last week to promote her new cookbook. Here is an excerpt of her conversation with Inquirer Food editor Maureen Fitzgerald:   Question: When did you start cooking seriously?   Answer: I never really cooked growing up. My friends were not into cooking. I'm not kidding, they use their ovens for sweater storage. It wasn't until later, when I had the unpaid audience of my husband, that I got much more into it. I remember thinking, I'm an adult, I want to make a roasted chicken, and I didn't have my go-to recipe.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's the sour coleslaw, the cream coleslaw, the regular potato salad, the German potato salad, the three-bean salad. And pickles, the salted rye, the butter tubs. Out of the kitchen, on an endless parade of trays, comes some 800 pounds of crispy fried haddock. If it's Friday, this must be Wisconsin. In nearly every restaurant, supper club and corner tavern in the state - and few are the corners in this state without taverns - fish fries on Friday. So ingrained here are the weekly low-cost, all-you-can-eat feasts that bartender Chester Blaszczyk, who pulls beers for the regulars at Turners Hall in downtown Milwaukee, can't quite understand why an outlander would even ask. "No matter where you go, everybody's got fish fries on Friday," he says, stopping between the taps to scratch his gray crew-cut.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | By Robert West and Eileen O'Donnell FOR THE INQUIRER
Now that you've recovered from last weekend's nail-biter against Green Bay, it's time to start planning your NFC Championship Game party. The Eagles will take on Carolina Sunday at the Linc at 6:45 p.m. Couldn't get a ticket for the game? Yeah, we couldn't either. One of the most important components to any party is the food. And while Panthers quarterback Jake Delhomme might make you too nervous to eat, there's bound to be someone at your shindig who's not worried that the Birds have to play without Brian Westbrook and Carlos Emmons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Smoke is a great appetite-awakener. Especially sweet, moist smoke that's been caressing ribs and briskets. And when it sweeps through the parking lot at Red Hot & Blue, adjacent to the Holiday Inn on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, even on a heat-busting, sweat-filled day, smoke can make you smile. When I was last here, about three years ago, there were 20 of these barbecue houses in operation. Now there are close to 70, which is pretty much a barometer of the chain's popularity.
FOOD
December 9, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At holiday time, food takes center stage. Oh, the decorations and presents are fine, but holidays are made of memories, and more than most things, food evokes those memories. So as we eat our way through the National Food Fete that started with Thanksgiving, continues through Hanukkah, and crests with Christmas, we asked some local people to share their favorite holiday dishes. For WHYY president Bill Marrazzo, it wouldn't be Christmas without his grandmother's pasta and anchovy dish, one of the traditional seven fishes that his Italian American family enjoys on Christmas Eve. Except that now it is his wife, Randi, of Norwegian decent, who makes Marie Antoinette Giugliano's Pasta Aglio e Olio.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 8, 2013
Tip of the Week   Summer eating Barbecues are a great part of summer. Here are some tips about what to eat and what not to eat: Don't eat . . . ribs. They are one of the worst foods on the menu because they are much higher in fat than they are in protein. If you have a craving for ribs, make them baby back as opposed to spare ribs. Eat . . . grilled or rotisserie chicken (sans skin). This is the best entree because it is loaded with lean protein, which also helps you feel fuller longer so you don't munch on excess calories.
FOOD
December 13, 2012
Deb Perelman, author of the popular cooking blog "smittenkitchen," was at the Free Library of Philadelphia last week to promote her new cookbook. Here is an excerpt of her conversation with Inquirer Food editor Maureen Fitzgerald:   Question: When did you start cooking seriously?   Answer: I never really cooked growing up. My friends were not into cooking. I'm not kidding, they use their ovens for sweater storage. It wasn't until later, when I had the unpaid audience of my husband, that I got much more into it. I remember thinking, I'm an adult, I want to make a roasted chicken, and I didn't have my go-to recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012
Outlet: PBR Bar & Grill at Xfinity Live! We went: Pregame, 5:45 p.m. Wait: None. Order: Slow-smoked ribs. Cost: $14. Phindings: Looking for a change of scene, the Pharaoh of Phoodelphia decided to taste-test Xfinity Live!, the mega-food court that now occupies the site of the beloved Spectrum. For the first of several cross-Pattison-Avenue excursions to be undertaken this season, PP settled on the PBR Bar & Grill, which stands for Professional Bull Riders, not the downscale beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
May we put in a good word for pepper hash, handmaiden of the fish cake, stand-in for the pricey lemon (in Victorian times), friend of the workingman - on the verge now of culinary extinction in a Philadelphia where ho-hum coleslaws, chow chows, and that tart cherry-pepper hoagie relish seem to be coasting just fine, riding free and easy. Is there no justice? Sweet pepper hash has more than earned a place at the table where for most of the city's existence it was a fixture. "Fish cooks paired it up with fried oysters, soft-shell crabs, codfish balls, shad fritters, and grilled catfish," historian William Woys Weaver recounts, noting its perfect attendance at catfish suppers once prevalent hereabouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | By Robert West and Eileen O'Donnell FOR THE INQUIRER
Now that you've recovered from last weekend's nail-biter against Green Bay, it's time to start planning your NFC Championship Game party. The Eagles will take on Carolina Sunday at the Linc at 6:45 p.m. Couldn't get a ticket for the game? Yeah, we couldn't either. One of the most important components to any party is the food. And while Panthers quarterback Jake Delhomme might make you too nervous to eat, there's bound to be someone at your shindig who's not worried that the Birds have to play without Brian Westbrook and Carlos Emmons.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Terri VanArsdale had such a great time at a Damon's rib house in State College she thought it might not be a bad idea to open her own franchise in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. It certainly would cut down on travel time. "Actually, I always wanted to open a restaurant. And the opportunity arose, so I decided to go for it," she said. "I took the leap and went in. And I'm having a great time. " So, it seems, is everyone else who stops by VanArsdale's Damon's, just west of Atlantic City on the Black Horse Pike.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Smoke is a great appetite-awakener. Especially sweet, moist smoke that's been caressing ribs and briskets. And when it sweeps through the parking lot at Red Hot & Blue, adjacent to the Holiday Inn on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, even on a heat-busting, sweat-filled day, smoke can make you smile. When I was last here, about three years ago, there were 20 of these barbecue houses in operation. Now there are close to 70, which is pretty much a barometer of the chain's popularity.
FOOD
December 9, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At holiday time, food takes center stage. Oh, the decorations and presents are fine, but holidays are made of memories, and more than most things, food evokes those memories. So as we eat our way through the National Food Fete that started with Thanksgiving, continues through Hanukkah, and crests with Christmas, we asked some local people to share their favorite holiday dishes. For WHYY president Bill Marrazzo, it wouldn't be Christmas without his grandmother's pasta and anchovy dish, one of the traditional seven fishes that his Italian American family enjoys on Christmas Eve. Except that now it is his wife, Randi, of Norwegian decent, who makes Marie Antoinette Giugliano's Pasta Aglio e Olio.
FOOD
April 5, 1995 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Cabbage is not only reasonably priced, but highly recommended by nutritionists, based on research that indicates this cruciferous vegetable might help protect the body from cancer. In preparing cabbage, many of us tend to fall back on standbys like coleslaw. Some of us remember our mothers' or grandmothers' satisfying, slowly cooked cabbage dishes, but we hesitate to prepare them as they seem to involve a lot of time and effort. I found that these time-honored formulas for cooking cabbage are worth revisiting, as they can be easily adapted to our busy schedules.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's something comforting about gnawing on ribs. Why else the explosion of rib joints in the area? These days it seems as if there are more ribs on plates than on the hoof. Maybe it's because they are so American. Maybe it's the back-to-basics '90s. Or maybe it's that ribs - and Southern barbecue in general - soothe jangled psyches. "Ribs are really hot in the Northeast," said Theresa Harden, executive vice president of the National Barbecue Association in Charlotte, N.C., which represents 450 restaurant owners, caterers and retailers.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|