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Collage

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Collage painting - embedding things such as photographs, bits of text and real-world objects in a matrix of brushed pigment - is a common strategy. Yet even when two artists adopt a similar approach, the results can differ markedly. This is apparent in exhibitions of mixed-media works by Kate Davis at Bridgette Mayer Gallery and Richard J. Watson at Artjaz Gallery. Both artists rely heavily on found materials to suggest narratives and trigger memories, but create different moods.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Of the various curious things the enigmatic collagist and correspondence artist Ray Johnson did over the course of his career - and much of what he did was pointedly inexplicable - one was to suddenly transfer ownership of 13 cardboard boxes tied with twine to his friend Robert Warner, a New York optician, in 1990. Warner looked over their contents - found objects and hundreds of envelopes (addressed by Johnson but never mailed) - but did not begin to archive them until after Johnson's suicide in 1995, at age 67. In June, at the invitation of Esopus Space in New York, Warner opened each of the boxes in public, discussed their contents, and chose certain objects of Johnson's for display there.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My daughter was repeatedly date-raped at the age of 16. Her predator threatened to kill her if she ever told, so she kept it to herself until she could get away from him. It was a very scary time in her life, but with the help of counseling she is working through it and moving on with her life. The problem is, while visiting with my in-laws it was pointed out to us that my mother-in-law had made a collage of pictures and included in it the person who raped my daughter. In all, there are five pictures of him in group settings.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some teachers at Strawberry Mansion Middle and High School were up in arms this week when a collage on a program cover for a Black History Month assembly included photographs of not only African American heroes but also Hitler and Mussolini. The cover - designed by students under the direction of a social studies teacher - set off a series of meetings in which black and white faculty members aired simmering racial tensions that, they said, often exist unspoken at many city schools.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bedroom lay a white silk pillow - yellowed with age and emblazoned with the screaming eagle emblem of the Army's 101st Airborne Division. On the walls were pictures and plaques telling the story of a World War II veteran; in another room was an adjustable hospital bed and, on a windowsill, a worn Bible. That October day, Jim Bennett was looking for an investment, a house to buy, rehab, then rent or resell, as he has done with about 500 others over more than 20 years. But Bennett found much more at the modest, two-story rowhouse on Winton Street in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Getting phone calls from classmates and attending birthday parties are all normal expectations of childhood. But some children never experience them. Kyndra Needham, 11, was one of those youngsters whose name was missing from invitation lists, according to her mother Gwen Needham. Looking for a way to fit in, Kyndra found help through Collage, a Newtown Square-based occupational therapy program that helps children age 5 through 15 gain social skills. "She was alienated from her peer group.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
Children are invited to party Sunday afternoon on the Ben Franklin Yacht during a SpongeBob Boat Party. Captain Lucky will steer the cruise as kids and their parents party with cartoon character SpongeBob at 1 p.m. on the Delaware River. The 90-minute cruise will include pizza, hot dogs, and other refreshments. A DJ will spin kid-friendly tunes for children to hit the dance floor, and SpongeBob will sign autographs for the youngsters. SpongeBob Boat Party, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Ben Franklin Yacht, 401 N. Delaware Ave., at Pier 24. Boarding begins at noon.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A piece of the undershirt that President Abraham Lincoln was wearing the night that he was assassinated. The handwritten notes of conversations in the room where Lincoln lay dying April 15, 1865. One of 24 remaining copies of the Emancipation Proclamation, from 48 printed to order the freeing of slaves. There are some interesting items in the archives of Philadelphia's Union League. Yesterday, that clubhouse of Republican sympathies south of City Hall opened its doors to nonmembers, 803 well-behaved members of the masses.
NEWS
January 6, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Services for Thomas Beckett, 55, of South Philadelphia, an artist who was exhibits manager at the Please Touch Museum and a teacher at the Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial, are to be held at 4 p.m. Sunday at the school. Mr. Beckett died of lung cancer Nov. 20 at Vitas Hospice in Frankford. His last exhibit consisted of a collage of his own medical records, and of Camel cigarette packs he had collected during decades as a smoker. Mr. Beckett's talent as a sculptor and an artist can be seen throughout Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The West Coast import that opened Friday evening on the Steinbright Stage of the People's Light and Theatre Co. is pretty raw fare for the good burghers of the Great Valley who normally populate the Malvern playbarn. On the other hand, Raymond J. Barry's "Once in Doubt" seemed to appeal enormously to a house spilling over with "performing and plastic artists" who responded to the company's invitation to see the show free of charge, allegedly in thrall to its "special resonance for artists from other disciplines.
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NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bedroom lay a white silk pillow - yellowed with age and emblazoned with the screaming eagle emblem of the Army's 101st Airborne Division. On the walls were pictures and plaques telling the story of a World War II veteran; in another room was an adjustable hospital bed and, on a windowsill, a worn Bible. That October day, Jim Bennett was looking for an investment, a house to buy, rehab, then rent or resell, as he has done with about 500 others over more than 20 years. But Bennett found much more at the two-story rowhouse on Winton Street in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bedroom lay a white silk pillow - yellowed with age and emblazoned with the screaming eagle emblem of the Army's 101st Airborne Division. On the walls were pictures and plaques telling the story of a World War II veteran; in another room was an adjustable hospital bed and, on a windowsill, a worn Bible. That October day, Jim Bennett was looking for an investment, a house to buy, rehab, then rent or resell, as he has done with about 500 others over more than 20 years. But Bennett found much more at the modest, two-story rowhouse on Winton Street in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My daughter was repeatedly date-raped at the age of 16. Her predator threatened to kill her if she ever told, so she kept it to herself until she could get away from him. It was a very scary time in her life, but with the help of counseling she is working through it and moving on with her life. The problem is, while visiting with my in-laws it was pointed out to us that my mother-in-law had made a collage of pictures and included in it the person who raped my daughter. In all, there are five pictures of him in group settings.
NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Though he started out as the youngest member of the first British Conceptual Art group in the 1960s, London-based artist John Stezaker quickly gravitated back to picture-making, first appropriating media images and, later, film-derived ones in his collages. He is perhaps best known for his series "Marriage," collage portraits in which he cuts and overlaps two Hollywood publicity shots of two film stars to create one familiar but also strangely distorted face (his closest American counterpart would be Cindy Sherman)
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Of the various curious things the enigmatic collagist and correspondence artist Ray Johnson did over the course of his career - and much of what he did was pointedly inexplicable - one was to suddenly transfer ownership of 13 cardboard boxes tied with twine to his friend Robert Warner, a New York optician, in 1990. Warner looked over their contents - found objects and hundreds of envelopes (addressed by Johnson but never mailed) - but did not begin to archive them until after Johnson's suicide in 1995, at age 67. In June, at the invitation of Esopus Space in New York, Warner opened each of the boxes in public, discussed their contents, and chose certain objects of Johnson's for display there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
Children are invited to party Sunday afternoon on the Ben Franklin Yacht during a SpongeBob Boat Party. Captain Lucky will steer the cruise as kids and their parents party with cartoon character SpongeBob at 1 p.m. on the Delaware River. The 90-minute cruise will include pizza, hot dogs, and other refreshments. A DJ will spin kid-friendly tunes for children to hit the dance floor, and SpongeBob will sign autographs for the youngsters. SpongeBob Boat Party, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Ben Franklin Yacht, 401 N. Delaware Ave., at Pier 24. Boarding begins at noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
'Meditations on Collage," a group show at Bridgette Mayer Gallery, provides a fluid framework for six regional artists who arrived at their present approach to cut-and-paste. What all have in common is that they interpret the world around them, often abstractly. Tom Judd, the elder statesman, creates the dominant impression in this show, capturing the intimate communion with nature and close affinity with trees, plants, and birds. There's some indication Judd takes refuge in the art world, if not in the academy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2009 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
"I'm not sure if it's a blessing or a curse, but I'm definitely obsessed by memory and music," says Matt Ward from his home in Portland, Ore. Ward's albums are riddled with nostalgic references both musical and lyrical, and they have titles such as End of Amnesia and Hold Time, his newly released sixth album. He's an expert guitar player, influenced by classic finger-pickers like John Fahey and Elizabeth Cotten, but he's not interested in showcasing his prowess. "I've always had the idea that no matter how hard I try, I'm not going to be able to play like Chet Atkins or my favorite guitar players.
NEWS
December 9, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
At holiday time, as in the rest of the year, religion is a partisan matter and beauty in the eye of the beholder. But almost no matter what your emotional need, Peter Nero's got you covered. For his two-hour-plus holiday show with the Philly Pops that opened Friday night, the conductor-pianist curates a holiday experience that, in an era that prefers sharply defining religious and political differences, still animates the value of a common experience. Nero will help you dream of a white Christmas, starting the tune at the keyboard with a Twilight Zone mysteriousness that melts away into his warm, expansive pianism.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A piece of the undershirt that President Abraham Lincoln was wearing the night that he was assassinated. The handwritten notes of conversations in the room where Lincoln lay dying April 15, 1865. One of 24 remaining copies of the Emancipation Proclamation, from 48 printed to order the freeing of slaves. There are some interesting items in the archives of Philadelphia's Union League. Yesterday, that clubhouse of Republican sympathies south of City Hall opened its doors to nonmembers, 803 well-behaved members of the masses.
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