CollectionsCollagen
IN THE NEWS

Collagen

NEWS
March 25, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gardeners are famous for recycling. They convert kitchen scraps to compost, stake tomatoes with old pantyhose, and hang unwanted CDs on sticks to spook birds in the berry patch. But there's one thing every gardener buys that routinely gets tossed in the trash and buried in a landfill: the plastic flower pots used to grow seedlings. They're everywhere, especially at this time of year. They don't decompose, and they're not usually made of the plastic recycled in these parts.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plate at the restaurant in Beijing was laden with thin, yellowish sheets made from soybeans, called tofu skin. Peter Lelkes used them as the chef intended, to wrap vegetables into bite-size morsels. But as he ate, the biomedical engineer's thoughts strayed from the Chinese restaurant to his lab in Philadelphia. The tofu-based "skin," he realized, made him think of the real thing. A decade later, that chance encounter in a Chinese restaurant has led to a soy-based "skin substitute" - a wound dressing that a start-up company has licensed for use on diabetic ulcers, burns, and other injuries the body cannot readily heal on its own. Lelkes and his Temple University colleagues say the product has shown promise in animal studies, and the company, Eqalix in Reston, Va., is raising money to seek FDA approval.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, doctors have said it was impossible to predict, with rare exceptions, who was doomed. But yesterday, Thomas Jefferson University researchers said they have discovered a gene that causes the disease and will soon have a saliva test to identify those at risk. Doctors had thought that the blowout, called a ruptured aneurysm, was related to atherosclerosis, which is a form of hardening of the arteries. But the new research suggests that the primary cause is a genetic defect that weakens the walls of the aorta.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas A. Kefalides, 86, of Merion, a physician, a groundbreaking scientist, and an educator, died Friday, Dec. 6, at his home from complications of pulmonary fibrosis. Dr. Kefalides was emeritus professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and remained active until his final days as a member of the medical school's admissions committee. In 1970, he began what would become a 43-year career at Penn and a high-profile role as a pioneer in the study of the extracellular matrix - components of the body that fill the space between structured cells.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Connaught Laboratories Inc., a manufacturer of vaccines and biological products in Swiftwater, Monroe County, Pa., has formed a joint venture with Liposome Co. of Princeton. The two firms intend to use liposome technology to develop a more effective influenza vaccine. Liposomes are manmade microscopic spheres composed of naturally occurring substances known as lipids. The liposomes can be loaded with a cargo of drugs or therapeutic products that otherwise would be dispersed and destroyed in the body.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
DOWNWARDLY MOBILE Will young adults in the United States be less affluent than their parents? Yes, says Lawrence Mishel, co-author of The State of Working America. Mishel, research director of the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, says the economic position of the typical young family deteriorated during the 1980s as a result of a fall in real wages, the shift in employment toward low-wage industries, the effects of large trade deficits, and the erosion of union membership.
FOOD
June 25, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. What is the process for making non-alcoholic beer? I drink non-alcoholic beverages and would like the question answered because sometimes the cure is worse than the problem. The beers I drink are Moussy and Elan, which are Swiss, and Wurzburger and Clausthaler, which are German. Richard Renkum Wolcott, Conn. A. Harold Broderick, technical director of the Master Brewers Association of the Americas, explains that the so-called "non-alcoholic" beers are brewed with the same materials as regular beers, that is, barley malt, cereal grains and hops.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People who suffer the shooting back and leg pain known as sciatica may have inherited a gene that makes them vulnerable to this common disease, which affects about half a million people every year. Leena Ala-Kokko and colleagues at MCP Hahnemann University found a genetic defect that weakens the material in the disks between the back's vertebrae. The researchers, who announced their findings in today's issue of Science, found the genetic mutation in only 5 percent of a group of 157 sciatica patients.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from People magazine, the Chicago Tribune and Inquirer wire services
AIDS POLL. Of 500 single women surveyed recently by People magazine, 75 percent said they were "extremely" or "very" concerned about AIDS. Forty percent said their sex lives had been directly affected. Of those who've changed their ways, 78 percent said they've become choosier about lovers. DENTIST HEAL THYSELF. Dentists suffer more fatal heart attacks than any other professional group, and notoriously poor diet and exercise habits are largely to blame. So said pediatrician and nutritionist Gabe Mirkin, speaking Friday at a dental conference in Philadelphia.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|