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Collard Greens

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NEWS
March 5, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Befitting a month in which students and parents admittedly learned things they had never known, Barbara Moore's sixth-grade class at the Thomas E. Bowe School ended February with a celebration of African American culture and food. Led by master of ceremonies Brian Russell, the students performed for each other and a number of their parents, showing off what they had just learned during Black History Month. Many of the students had multiple roles. Not only did Toni DiBona, for example, play "Amazing Grace" on the flute, but she also had written a play that included scenes from the lives of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Sylvia Woods, 86, founder of the famed Harlem soul food restaurant Sylvia's has died. Tren'ness Woods-Black, her granddaughter, said Mrs. Woods died Thursday at her home in Mount Vernon, N.Y. She had been dealing with Alzheimer's disease. Mrs. Woods and her husband, Herbert, who died in 2001, started Sylvia's Restaurant in 1962. The restaurant became a fixture, with tourists and locals going there for cornbread, ribs, collard greens, and other Southern cooking staples. Woods-Black said her grandmother had stepped down from running the restaurant when she was 80, leaving it in the hands of her children and grandchildren.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
SURROUNDED BY the fried chicken, burger and doughnut joints that make even the air seem fattening around SEPTA's Frankford Transportation Center, a farmers' market opened yesterday offering, to 16,000 daily commuters, just-picked peaches from the farmer who picked them and an abundance of fresh veggies. Open Tuesday afternoons at Bridge Street and Bustleton Avenue, the market features tomatoes, apples and those peaches from Hands On Earth Orchard, in Lititz, Lancaster County, whose farmer, Dave Fahnestock, promised this reporter that if I tried one of his Cortland apples, I'd never go back to Red Delicious.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
Q: Do I really need milk for calcium? I hate the stuff but I don't want to do anything to compromise my health. - Ms. Conscientious about Calcium A: I don't think we ever "needed" cow's milk for general nutrition, let alone for calcium, contrary to popular belief. All mammals, including us, produce milk for their babies. As far as I know, we're the only mammals that drink another species' milk, like, forever. Also, I think it is interesting to note that osteoporosis is highest in industrialized nations where there is high consumption of animal protein, dairy products and milk.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Friday's lunch menu at the cafeteria of a big auto plant in Normal, Ill., offered meatloaf and egg rolls. It wasn't expected to cause a stampede by gourmets. But it was politically correct and sensitive. You never know where political correctness and sensitivity will rear its stern head. It's something new almost every day. This is how it came to the company cafeteria of the Diamond-Star Motors Corp. Some time ago, an executive asked the firm that operates the cafeteria to broaden the menu, offer more choices, provide some variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
WHAT, NO watermelon? Excuse the sarcasm, but I'm still looking side-eyed at a laughable attempt by a restaurant inside the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa to celebrate the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday by serving fried chicken. Wait, there's more: The Metropolitan restaurant also dished up collard greens and macaroni and cheese in honor of the slain civil-rights leader. Advertised as the "Martin Luther King Jr. Special," the $24 meal consisted of fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole, collard greens and homemade pecan pie. Joe Lupo, senior vice president of the Borgata, told me that the restaurant chose menu items that were among King's favorite foods as a way to honor him and that the menu was put together by the restaurant's African-American general manager.
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | New York Daily News
Anne Robinson cooked up some collard greens Sunday morning, turned off the gas and left her apartment to go to church in Manhattan. When she returned home at about 2 p.m., a security guard was standing outside her door, which had been smashed in. "When I got out of the elevator and saw my front door down, I thought it was a robbery," said Robinson, a NYNEX employee. "I thought someone broke into my apartment. " Someone did - the New York Police Department. It seems neighbors thought Robinson's collard greens smelled like a dead body.
LIVING
October 31, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Joy's in the kitchen, she likes to dice onions and peppers for a recipe or run the mixer for a cake. And it's extra -special fun for her to be in the middle of the action when preparations for her favorite meal are in progress: collard greens, fish, macaroni and cheese, and sweet potato pie. Joy, 11, became a Girl Scout recently and looks forward to hiking. She sings and dances to music on the radio, and would like to join a church choir. She likes computer games, corn-rowing her doll's hair, doing 30-piece puzzles, riding a bicycle, bowling and playing tag. She also enjoys drawing and coloring.
LIVING
December 22, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the garden was ripening, Shamar, 9, was always out there, looking at the fruits of his labor. The collard greens, red tomatoes and flowering marigolds were abundant. "Look at this!" he said, pride in his voice. He had helped his foster mother plant the flowers and vegetables. She says it's an example of how he has shown a lot of improvement in the last three years. "He does need to do things with somebody," she continues. "There's a problem with him focusing. " There is abuse and neglect in his background.
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NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at Elwyn officially have gone into the farming business. The 163-year-old organization, which provides services for children and adults with disabilities, has taken over operations at the eight-acre farm on the campus in Middletown Township, Delaware County. "Everything is going directly to our folks," Ethan Brazell, 34, assistant director in education, said Tuesday. Greener Partners, a community-supported agriculture nonprofit (CSA), had run the farm for about six years, but it has consolidated operations at its Collegeville, Montgomery County, farm, Brazell said.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
WHAT, NO watermelon? Excuse the sarcasm, but I'm still looking side-eyed at a laughable attempt by a restaurant inside the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa to celebrate the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday by serving fried chicken. Wait, there's more: The Metropolitan restaurant also dished up collard greens and macaroni and cheese in honor of the slain civil-rights leader. Advertised as the "Martin Luther King Jr. Special," the $24 meal consisted of fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole, collard greens and homemade pecan pie. Joe Lupo, senior vice president of the Borgata, told me that the restaurant chose menu items that were among King's favorite foods as a way to honor him and that the menu was put together by the restaurant's African-American general manager.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LULA MAE FLOWERS might have stood just 5 feet tall, but you didn't want to get her riled up. One way to really bring out Lula Mae's combative nature was to do or say anything against her family. "We must be very clear that if you tried to harm her family - especially her boys - this 5-foot lady would single-handedly make you regret that decision," her family said in a tribute. Other than that, Lula Mae was a loving and nurturing woman, a cook whose pigs feet and barbecue ribs were family legends, and a shopper whose devotion to finding a bargain kept storekeepers on their toes all over the city.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVA BASKERVILLE looked into the future and didn't like what she saw. Since childhood, she had toiled on her family's tobacco farm in Henderson, N.C. What would her future be? Marry a farmer, have a bunch of kids, continue working the soil? No thanks. She moved to Philadelphia. Eva and her sister, Rosa Lee, equally fed up with farming, came to the city, where an aunt lived, and Eva, then 19, started a new life in an urban environment. Eva Norman - as she became after marrying Clarence Norman Jr., the operator of a clothing store that specialized in uniforms - was a devoted churchwoman and outstanding cook in the Southern tradition.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
PHILADELPHIA is lucky to enjoy a thriving array of farmers markets. Their popularity, however, has created an interesting post-nutritional phenomenon, at least in my eyes. Lines of humble tables piled with gorgeous produce can turn into mobbed social gatherings faster than you can mispronounce "endive. " A shopper lingering over a basket of peaches might get clipped by a luxury stroller pushed by parents channeling "Fast and Furious 6. " A cook surveying the cheese selection runs the risk of a punch to the solar plexus from a self-proclaimed "locavore" vying for the last bunch of asparagus.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN KETTIE Eugene arrived in Oxford Circle from her native Haiti 11 years ago, she brought along her parents' attitude toward growing your own vegetables. "If you don't grow, you don't eat," Eugene said on a recent Sunday morning, tending the plants in her raised bed at the Take Back Your Neighborhood community garden, dressed in an elegant red outfit because she had come directly from early Mass at Our Lady of Ransom Church. Being the best-dressed urban gardener in Northeast Philadelphia didn't cramp Eugene's style as she hand-watered her cucumbers, zucchini, snow peas, collard greens, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and cabbage with a sprinkler can, and planted marigolds to keep the ladybugs away.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Sociable, happy, and energetic are words often used to describe Johnanya, a delightful 6-year-old with a bright smile and beautiful hazel eyes. She is in kindergarten, where her favorite subjects are reading and art. She gets along well with her teachers and classmates. Johnanya says that the things she likes to do most are laugh, play, and "be good. " She also likes a good joke. Johnanya enjoys making arts and crafts projects and listening to a good story. Her favorite foods include collard greens and green beans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
Q: Do I really need milk for calcium? I hate the stuff but I don't want to do anything to compromise my health. - Ms. Conscientious about Calcium A: I don't think we ever "needed" cow's milk for general nutrition, let alone for calcium, contrary to popular belief. All mammals, including us, produce milk for their babies. As far as I know, we're the only mammals that drink another species' milk, like, forever. Also, I think it is interesting to note that osteoporosis is highest in industrialized nations where there is high consumption of animal protein, dairy products and milk.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel C. Alexander, 91, of Darby Township, a retired building inspector and ship's carpenter who was active in his community and church, died Sunday, Feb. 24, at an assisted living facility in Southfield, Mich. He had been in Michigan since 2011 to be close to a daughter and a son who live there. Mr. Alexander was a building inspector for 27 years in Darby Township. He inspected residential and commercial buildings, churches, and other structures, retiring in 1992. For part of that time, Mr. Alexander, a Navy veteran, also worked as a shipwright (ship's carpenter)
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