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Collateral Damage

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NEWS
July 8, 2011 | Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - A convicted felon charged with killing a 75-year-old South Dakota hospice nurse so that he could steal her car and drive to Washington, D.C., described the woman during a TV interview as "collateral damage" in what he envisioned as a scheme to kill President Obama. James McVay, 41, is charged with first-degree murder and burglary in the weekend stabbing death of Maybelle Schein. During a jailhouse interview with television station WKOW, in Madison, Wis., where McVay was arrested Saturday, he said that Schein was "in my way and I removed her. " "He did it just more or less as kind of a lark, I guess," Schein's brother, Ted Fetters, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
EVERYONE is being oddly judgmental about the Cheney shooting incident in assuming it was an accident. After all, this shooter is already known for his homicidal tendencies because of his part in the international-law-violating, pre-emptive attacks on Iraq. Why such a mass-homicidal person is permitted to carry a gun is just one question. It may well be that he put that aspect of himself aside in his quest to kill small birds in Texas, but we need to keep an open mind. Perhaps those quail were security threats, carriers of avian flu or illegal immigrants, though that information must remain classified.
SPORTS
May 11, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
When Tiger Woods cracked up his car at the end of the driveway on Thanksgiving night, the golfer came away from the wreck with a long list of personal and professional collateral damage - some of which is still up on the lift in his private repair shop - and, more tangibly, he sustained a split lip and a sore neck. Fast-forward through the last five months, as Woods dealt with the messy unraveling of his world, still executed a reasonably quick return to golf, and now is forced to withdraw mid-round from a major tournament because of . . . a neck injury.
NEWS
March 10, 2004
We're not sure the lessons of this case will be all that helpful to American justice or financial markets. . . . Maybe there's some rough justice in putting [Martha] Stewart in an orange jumpsuit for fibbing about the circumstances of [a stock] sale with her broker. But in a case ostensibly brought on behalf of sticking up for the forgotten "little guy" . . . prosecutors might have weighed the price paid by the truly innocent here: all the Martha Stewart Living shareholders, employees, executives, and so forth whose livelihoods have suffered tremendously since this case first broke into the headlines and whose futures, like their company, are now in limbo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A heroic firefighter hunts down terrorists, avenging innocent lives lost during surprise attacks on the United States. This, the plotline of Collateral Damage, is no mere wish-fulfillment fantasy hatched in the aftermath of Sept. 11. It is pumped-up, feel-the-burn vigilantism starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, completed before the terrorist attacks and originally scheduled for an October release. As suspense craftsmanship, Collateral Damage is terrifically well wrought by director Andrew Davis, the filmmaker of The Fugitive.
NEWS
July 23, 1993
IN CLINTON'S OWN BACK YARD Washington is a place of murder. Recently an elderly woman was found in her house wrapped in a rug, her throat slit. Dealers kill dealers almost every day; innocents get caught in between. A gang member opened fire on young children in a swimming pool. And in the Oval Office the President, to send a signal to Saddam Hussein, ordered a bombing raid that he knew could well result in, as they say in the business, "collateral damage. " As payback for a foiled murder plot, the United States killed innocent people.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | By Molly Ivins
I don't know about y'all, but I'm starting to think maybe the country would be better off if we put all the politicians into Bedlam and let them carry on from there. Congress is making the president, scandal and all, look like a titan. First, they have a huge fight about whether to rename Washington National Airport after Ronald Reagan, our former president's greatest contribution to aviation having firing a bunch of air traffic controllers who are still mad about it. Ever get the feeling our lawmakers don't have a lot to do there?
NEWS
August 16, 1986
Columnist Jeff Greenfield (Op-ed Page, Aug. 5) criticizes some New York liberals for entertaining Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and refusing to confront him on the repressive measures he has instituted. Mr. Greenfield's point may be well taken and those New York liberals should be instructed. However, in reading Mr. Greenfield's open letter to them, I felt that his intent was to persuade his readers to treat anyone sympathizing with the Nicaraguans or advocating a dialogue with Mr. Ortega as soft on injustice.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | By Judy Harch
As with most Americans these days, my mind never strays far from the war we are waging against terrorism. Recently, I had an epiphany about wars and heroes. Terrorism exists in many forms. Heroes and heroines are often disguised as everyday folks. Brave souls who keep marching forward into the face of certain pain and possible death. One lives right in my midst. I see her often. I know the toll the wages of war bring to her body and her spirit. She is my dear friend of 37 years.
NEWS
September 24, 2003
WE FEEL sorry for the 48,000 Philadelphia boys who suffer the collateral damage caused by the Boy Scouts of America's war against tolerance. But we don't see a way that the city can legally continue to allow the Cradle of Liberty Council to stay in its headquarters on city property at 22nd and Winter streets. The city solicitor has advised Mayor Street that the 1928 law that gave the land to the Scouts requires that they be evicted after a year's notice. It's a double shame because the local Boy Scout council opposes and has fought the national Boy Scouts' policy of discriminating against gay leaders and boys who do not believe in God. The loss of the city headquarters will make the Boy Scouts a mostly suburban program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former executive of a Chester County gift company has been charged with embezzling more than $1.4 million from his employers and using the money for lavish purchases, including $48,000 on concert tickets and a reception with the Dave Matthews Band, the district attorney said Wednesday. Guido la Vella of Gilbertsville is accused of stealing from Taylor Gifts Inc., a direct-order company based in Tredyffrin Township, while he was the company's chief financial officer from October 2009 until May 2013.
SPORTS
September 15, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
WASHINGTON - Two weeks earlier, Kyle Kendrick sat in the visiting clubhouse at New York's Citi Field and pondered both his odd 2013 season and the uncertainty of where he'd be in 2014. "I want to be here," Kendrick said of a Phillies team he's been with longer than any pitcher except Cole Hamels. "I feel like I haven't pitched horrible enough to be gone. " Kendrick, who has improved dramatically since being jettisoned to the minor leagues in the spring of 2009, may have been the Phillies most consistent starting pitcher in the first 2 months of the 2013 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Next to Normal is, for lack of a better term, a musical tragedy. With its beautifully sung score telling a painful and upsetting story, it challenges conventional expectations of what big Broadway musicals are likely to be. The fine production at the Arden Theatre, directed by Terrence J. Nolen, begins with a huge close-up of a face projected onto the upstage wall (the many stunning and disturbing images were created by Jorge Cousineau). Eyes fly open and we are at once looking and being looked at. The spare set - everything is square or stripes - turns out to be the Goodman family's suburban home.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
Two family-owned nurseries that have been around for generations in the Philadelphia suburbs are wishing the summer hadn't brought unexpected financial heat in the form of the Waterloo Gardens bankruptcy. Both are entangled in the Chapter 11 case filed June 26 by the debt-soaked gardening center that closed its renowned Devon store. Both landed on an unenviable list: creditors holding the 20 largest unsecured claims. And both longtime suppliers of poinsettias, annuals, and other earthly wares to the region's onetime preeminent gardening center are coming to understand the exquisite frustration of being a little guy in a big, old bankruptcy case.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012
Question: Eight months ago, after a brief illness, my 57-year-old friend's husband passed away. Their marriage had always been a bit rocky, and after his death we learned that he'd been involved in some questionable activities. Needless to say, her emotions ran the gamut from disbelief to anger to grief. During this time, I was there for her to listen, care, and encourage, and supported her decision to seek professional counseling. But now I'm concerned she might be moving too quickly through this process.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The news that NFL players are paid for being able to deliver hits capable of hurting an opponent isn't much of a revelation when you get down to it. That's the nature of the game. Hard hits are celebrated, and just as the NHL and NASCAR owe some popularity to the promise of potential violence at any moment, the NFL puts away a lot of dough because its players smack each other around with great frequency. The league has no problem licensing video games in which the mayhem is taken to cartoonish levels, and has never been bothered by the slavering mythology that NFL Films built around the exploits of guys like Ray Nitschke, Dick Butkus, and Mike Singletary, who were all nice enough when they weren't dismembering opponents.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - A convicted felon charged with killing a 75-year-old South Dakota hospice nurse so that he could steal her car and drive to Washington, D.C., described the woman during a TV interview as "collateral damage" in what he envisioned as a scheme to kill President Obama. James McVay, 41, is charged with first-degree murder and burglary in the weekend stabbing death of Maybelle Schein. During a jailhouse interview with television station WKOW, in Madison, Wis., where McVay was arrested Saturday, he said that Schein was "in my way and I removed her. " "He did it just more or less as kind of a lark, I guess," Schein's brother, Ted Fetters, said yesterday.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
THE media jumped all over the incident involving the cow that escaped from an Upper Darby slaughterhouse. It received so much attention, Gov. Corbett even issued a "pardon" for the cow. Meanwhile, the media have paid very little attention to the fact that the governor is pen-happy in signing death warrants for humans. Although he's been in office less than six months, he's already signed (at least) four, including one for James "Jimmy" Dennis, whom many people, myself included, believe is innocent.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
City Councilman Bill Green's support for a bill to eliminate the Philadelphia Sheriff's Office has earned him some enemies in the African American political community, with State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams (D., Philadelphia) leading the way. Green obviously was not quite prepared for the political blowback he reaped in June when he cosponsored Councilman Frank DiCicco's bill to eliminate the Sheriff's Office. The political community was abuzz last month after State Rep. Jewell Williams, the city Democratic leadership's choice to succeed Sheriff John Green, had words with Councilman Green at Councilman Curtis Jones Jr.'s birthday bash.
NEWS
June 17, 2010
THERE have been any number of times since Sept. 11, 2001, when news from the wars overseas in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan detailed the loss of civilian life. Predator drone strikes, although highly successful in taking out the very worst of the worst, have often been associated with these losses. Chances are that when the stories appear, if you have any reaction at all, it's an acknowledgment that war is hell and that sometimes noncombatants end up in the cross-fire. (I put the blame for their deaths on their terrorist neighbors.
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