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LIVING
October 16, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drew Brining of Hammonton is only 12, but already he's signed up with the Southern New Jersey African Violet Club. He's even breeding his own plants. It helps that his mother, Donna, is club president and owner of Fancy Bloomers, an African violet business. Still, he's unusual on two fronts: He's young and he's male in a segment of the horticultural world saddled with a "little old lady" image that just won't quit. Back in the '50s and '60s, when the craze peaked, African violets were the favorite of stay-at-home moms and grandmothers.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Traditional, Modern, International" at Joan Perkes Fine Art is the commendable debut exhibition of a new gallery that opened its doors April 1 in a Lambertville neighborhood with a decidedly Cape May feel to it. From the start of this new venture, Perkes says, she was amazed at the phone calls she got from neighborhood people saying they had heard about her plans and wanted to know how they could help. Her enterprise was warmly welcomed as she set up shop in a large 1891 building where, once upon a time, spokes for automobile wheels were manufactured.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
Books are always good holiday gifts for collectors. Basic references are updated annually to record new coin issues, mintages, market trends, and prices paid at sales and auctions. A solid standard reference is Coin World's 1993 Guide to U.S. Coins, fifth edition (Amos Press, $4.95). This paperback includes the prices realized during the year's sales, as well as essays on U.S. numismatics. Errors and flaws, those coins that defy the odds and leave the mints clipped, blank, off-center and double- struck, fascinate collectors of all stripes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the antiques show sponsored annually by St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Cherry Hill, the antiques are almost secondary to the food. That, at least, is what the promoter says. The food, prepared by church volunteers, has been the big draw at the show during its seven-year existence. But collectors won't go hungry for the lack of antiques. At this year's show, at the Cherry Hill National Guard Armory tomorrow and Sunday, they'll find a wide assortment of merchandise: prints, china and glassware, country and Victorian furniture, jewelry and more, offered by more than 40 dealers.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
"Perfins" are one of the stamp hobby's inexpensive and challenging collecting subjects. Perfins - the term is collector's shorthand for perforated insignia or perforated initials - are stamps punched with tiny holes. The holes form outlines of letters, numbers, logos, coats of arms, animals, musical instruments or any of thousands of other designs. The perforations are used to identify the buyer of the stamps, and to discourage theft or misuse of stamps by employees of corporations, government agencies and organizations that buy postage in large quantities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the advance hype on two of the more interesting shows is any indication, collectors are in for a twin treat this weekend. The Philadelphia Antiques Show and Sale opening today at Twelve Caesars should attract collectors interested in a wide variety of antiques. Up for inspection and purchase are the collections of some 60 dealers from throughout the country. Estate and antique jewelry, "museum quality" artwork, cut glass and crystal, 18th and 19th century European antiques, furniture, art deco and nouveau and Oriental pieces highlight the selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Collecting dollhouse miniatures is the second most popular hobby in the United States. And that, no doubt, has to do with the anticipated convergence on the Holiday Inn in King of Prussia Sunday of some 500 to 800 collectors and hobbyists. The fifth annual Greater Philadelphia Area Dollhouse and Miniatures Show and Sale is set to get underway at 10 a.m. in the hotel's ballroom. Vendors from eight states are expected to show up with all manner of miniature merchandise, including authentic reproductions of furniture and such other teeny items as clay food and candelabra, mini-dolls and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Karla K. Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
For dedicated fans, the Star Trek adventures on television and film show an optimistic blueprint for the 21st century. The flip side of science fiction might be the industrial grimness of a film like Alien, but it's the crew of the Starship Enterprise that offers diversity, positive ideals, and a strong prime directive that promises a harmonious future. That goodness brings the series into the hearts of collectors. John Tenuto, collectible editor of trekmovie.com, is among the fans who consider finding memorabilia from Star Trek a family passion, one shared by his wife and son. On the site - launched in July 2006 to follow the movie that opened this week - Tenuto reviews collectibles and toys and serves as the resident "Shatnerologist," covering anything connected with the original Captain Kirk actor, William Shatner.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Beads are a perfect collectible. They are intriguing, durable, portable and available in infinite variety. Some are beautiful and valued objects of adornment; others unlock secrets of civilizations. Until now, there has been no comprehensive book on beads. Bead collector Lois Sherr Dubin has filled the need with The History of Beads From 30,000 B.C. to the Present (Abrams, $60). With the cooperation of museums, researchers and collectors, Dubin delves into the history of beads in nearly every part of the world.
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NEWS
January 14, 2016
FOUR MORE DOWN, so many more to go. The Federal Trade Commission recently smacked down four debt-collection outfits and their affiliates that the agency said engaged in abusive practices. This latest round of action is part of a federal, state, and local effort around the country to target deceptive debt collectors. I've personally been on the other end of a telephone call with a collector trying to bully me into paying a debt I didn't owe. The person was attempting to collect some medical payment that he claimed was owed by my deceased brother.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marie K. Hopkins, 84, of Bala Cynwyd, a chemist and later a data collector for the federal government, died Saturday, Oct. 17, of heart disease at Brandywine Assisted Living at Haverford Estates. She had lived at the facility for the last 16 months. Mrs. Hopkins was born in Plains, Pa., the daughter of Walter S. and Pearl Kownacki. She graduated in 1949 from Sacred Heart High School in Plains and four years later earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Misericordia University in Dallas, Pa. Her first job was as a chemist at the former Smith, Kline & French in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The opening of the Pennsylvania Turnpike's first all-electronic toll facility in Bucks County in January will be the first step toward doing away with cash tolls - and toll collectors - all along the turnpike. All-electronic tolling also is part of the long-delayed direct connection between the turnpike and I-95, now under construction. In January, when all turnpike tolls are to be increased by 6 percent, a new electronic toll will also be imposed on westbound vehicles at the eastern end of the turnpike.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Wharton Esherick never missed the opportunity to turn one of his pieces into a functional work of art, be it in the form of a stool, a plate for a light switch, or perhaps most famously, a music stand. The Philadelphia-born artist, who died in 1970 at 83, hand-carved his one-of-a-kind pieces in his Paoli home studio, bringing back old-fashioned techniques, combining them with contemporary design - and influencing generations of craftspeople. "Any studio woodworker worth their salt from the 1950s onward would make a pilgrimage to visit him. It was a rite of passage if you were going to be anything of worth in the field," said Elisabeth Agro, an associate curator of American modern and contemporary craft at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "He made one-off items, unique pieces.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Port Authority has filed charges against a part-time toll collector who allegedly stole $3,200 at the Walt Whitman Bridge this month. Earlier, the DRPA had said it was not sure it would prosecute, since the authority was being reimbursed for the missing money by the temp agency that hired the toll collector. Christopher McCoy of Philadelphia was charged with theft and removal of property, a third-degree felony, DRPA counsel Kristen Mayock said Friday. A court hearing has been set for Feb. 5 in Gloucester City Municipal Court.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A part-time toll collector at the Walt Whitman Bridge is suspected of stealing $3,200 this month, but he may not be prosecuted. Since the money will be repaid by the agency that hires part-time collectors, officials of the Delaware River Port Authority said they had not decided whether to seek the arrest and prosecution of the Philadelphia man suspected of stealing the money. "It appears a theft of that magnitude has occurred," DRPA chief executive John Hanson said Thursday. "No decision has been made about prosecuting.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irvin Basil Boyd Sr., 87, of Fort Washington, a nationally recognized antiques collector and dealer for many years, died Monday, Oct. 20, of congestive heart failure at his home. In a previous business venture, Mr. Boyd was a Philadelphia funeral director. Mr. Boyd was born in Philadelphia and educated at Germantown High School. His classes were interrupted when, at age 17, he enlisted in the Navy during World War II. He served in the Pacific. On returning home in 1946, Mr. Boyd resumed his education and married Lillian Dolores Horn, a high school friend.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
So rare and coveted is sea glass - the tiny pieces of discarded glass that wash ashore after being shaped and polished by years of tumbling around in the ocean - that it's been given the romantic name "mermaid's tears. " The roiling convergence of the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay has made Cape May a hot spot for finding the lollipop-colored shards, and next month, collectors from across the country are to gather there to display and talk about the treasures they have found. Besides offering plenty of after-season hotel space and a plethora of restaurants, the location at the southern tip of New Jersey is also particularly alluring because of the phenomenon of the "Cape May diamond," organizers of the North American Sea Glass Festival say. The stones aren't actually diamonds, but a locally sought-after, sea-polished white quartz found on the beaches of Cape May, which is hosting the festival for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Stock up on your favorite childhood items and autographed memorabilia, and catch sports figures in person at the Sports Card, Toy, Comic & Collectibles Show this weekend at Wildwood Convention Center on the Boardwalk. A wide range of items will be for sale, including Legos, Beanies, coins, and thousands of autographed cards of sports legends ranging from wrestling and baseball to hockey and football. There also will be appearances, and opportunities for memorabilia signing, with wrestling stars Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka and King Kong Bundy, baseball player Bob Scott of the Negro Leagues' New York Black Yankees, and NFL Hall of Famer Gino Marchetti.
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