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LIVING
October 16, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drew Brining of Hammonton is only 12, but already he's signed up with the Southern New Jersey African Violet Club. He's even breeding his own plants. It helps that his mother, Donna, is club president and owner of Fancy Bloomers, an African violet business. Still, he's unusual on two fronts: He's young and he's male in a segment of the horticultural world saddled with a "little old lady" image that just won't quit. Back in the '50s and '60s, when the craze peaked, African violets were the favorite of stay-at-home moms and grandmothers.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Traditional, Modern, International" at Joan Perkes Fine Art is the commendable debut exhibition of a new gallery that opened its doors April 1 in a Lambertville neighborhood with a decidedly Cape May feel to it. From the start of this new venture, Perkes says, she was amazed at the phone calls she got from neighborhood people saying they had heard about her plans and wanted to know how they could help. Her enterprise was warmly welcomed as she set up shop in a large 1891 building where, once upon a time, spokes for automobile wheels were manufactured.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
Books are always good holiday gifts for collectors. Basic references are updated annually to record new coin issues, mintages, market trends, and prices paid at sales and auctions. A solid standard reference is Coin World's 1993 Guide to U.S. Coins, fifth edition (Amos Press, $4.95). This paperback includes the prices realized during the year's sales, as well as essays on U.S. numismatics. Errors and flaws, those coins that defy the odds and leave the mints clipped, blank, off-center and double- struck, fascinate collectors of all stripes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the antiques show sponsored annually by St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Cherry Hill, the antiques are almost secondary to the food. That, at least, is what the promoter says. The food, prepared by church volunteers, has been the big draw at the show during its seven-year existence. But collectors won't go hungry for the lack of antiques. At this year's show, at the Cherry Hill National Guard Armory tomorrow and Sunday, they'll find a wide assortment of merchandise: prints, china and glassware, country and Victorian furniture, jewelry and more, offered by more than 40 dealers.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
"Perfins" are one of the stamp hobby's inexpensive and challenging collecting subjects. Perfins - the term is collector's shorthand for perforated insignia or perforated initials - are stamps punched with tiny holes. The holes form outlines of letters, numbers, logos, coats of arms, animals, musical instruments or any of thousands of other designs. The perforations are used to identify the buyer of the stamps, and to discourage theft or misuse of stamps by employees of corporations, government agencies and organizations that buy postage in large quantities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the advance hype on two of the more interesting shows is any indication, collectors are in for a twin treat this weekend. The Philadelphia Antiques Show and Sale opening today at Twelve Caesars should attract collectors interested in a wide variety of antiques. Up for inspection and purchase are the collections of some 60 dealers from throughout the country. Estate and antique jewelry, "museum quality" artwork, cut glass and crystal, 18th and 19th century European antiques, furniture, art deco and nouveau and Oriental pieces highlight the selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Collecting dollhouse miniatures is the second most popular hobby in the United States. And that, no doubt, has to do with the anticipated convergence on the Holiday Inn in King of Prussia Sunday of some 500 to 800 collectors and hobbyists. The fifth annual Greater Philadelphia Area Dollhouse and Miniatures Show and Sale is set to get underway at 10 a.m. in the hotel's ballroom. Vendors from eight states are expected to show up with all manner of miniature merchandise, including authentic reproductions of furniture and such other teeny items as clay food and candelabra, mini-dolls and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Karla K. Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
For dedicated fans, the Star Trek adventures on television and film show an optimistic blueprint for the 21st century. The flip side of science fiction might be the industrial grimness of a film like Alien, but it's the crew of the Starship Enterprise that offers diversity, positive ideals, and a strong prime directive that promises a harmonious future. That goodness brings the series into the hearts of collectors. John Tenuto, collectible editor of trekmovie.com, is among the fans who consider finding memorabilia from Star Trek a family passion, one shared by his wife and son. On the site - launched in July 2006 to follow the movie that opened this week - Tenuto reviews collectibles and toys and serves as the resident "Shatnerologist," covering anything connected with the original Captain Kirk actor, William Shatner.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Beads are a perfect collectible. They are intriguing, durable, portable and available in infinite variety. Some are beautiful and valued objects of adornment; others unlock secrets of civilizations. Until now, there has been no comprehensive book on beads. Bead collector Lois Sherr Dubin has filled the need with The History of Beads From 30,000 B.C. to the Present (Abrams, $60). With the cooperation of museums, researchers and collectors, Dubin delves into the history of beads in nearly every part of the world.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last four years, Upper Providence Township's tax collector had a history of sloppy bookkeeping and late payments, Montgomery County officials say, finally forcing them last month to freeze her accounts and seize her records. The county and the Spring-Ford Area School District are now combing through the records of Beverly Nohl, who served from 2010 through 2013, to reconcile undeposited checks, duplicate payments, lost receipts, and other issues. She "kind of stopped, in the fall of last year, performing the job adequately," said Bill Caldwell, a deputy tax collector for the county.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy Ann Samartino, 48, a former Moorestown Township tax collector for 27 years, died Sunday, Sept. 22, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Samartino died from breast cancer. Her husband, Gordon Samartino said she was diagnosed with the disease four years ago and underwent surgery in October 2009. She was being treated at the University of Pennsylvania. "She was in remission and had a reoccurrence in January of this year," he said Thursday. Mrs. Samartino was born in Willingboro and grew up in Delran.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former longtime tax collector for Aldan Borough and the William Penn School District was arrested Thursday after admitting he stole $1.3 million from both, said Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan. Robert H. Park, 77, of Aldan, was charged with theft by deception, receiving stolen property, and other offenses related to money taken between 2003 and 2012, according to the affidavit of probable cause. Whelan said Park has admitted that he took the money. The financially struggling school district lost $960,841.26 during that period, police said, and Aldan, $377,529.74.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Horsham firm that Merrill Lynch & Co. once dubbed "the Wal-Mart of debt collection" has continued to expand, with help from Wall Street investors, despite running afoul of consumer-protection laws. NCO Financial Systems of Horsham last year combined with other outsourced-collection and customer-contact firms controlled by a JPMorgan Chase & Co. investment fund into a holding company called Expert Global Solutions, based in Plano, Texas. Expert Global claims $2 billion in yearly revenue, databases that track consumers' purchases and contact information, and 42,000 workers at 120 call centers in the United States, the Philippines, India, Canada, Barbados, and Panama.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
D EAR HARRY : Back in 1998, I struggled to keep up with four credit-card debts. I was married with two kids, so it was tough. I managed to pay off two, but the other two were turned over for collection. I just could not make it. I then was sent to prison for four years for a minor crime. When I was released, I got a job and started to get back on my feet with help from a loyal and loving wife. I pay my bills on time, every time. Then, out of the blue, these two old bill collectors called and wrote and gave me 30 days to pay up. They were unbelievably rude and demanding.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware County district attorney is investigating what happened to as much as $1 million in tax funds missing from the William Penn School District and Aldan Borough. The inquiry is centered on the borough's tax collector, Robert H. Park, according to Jack Whelan, the district attorney. "He is cooperating," Whelan said, adding that Park, 76, and his attorneys approached the District Attorney's Office. The investigation is being handled by the economic-crime unit, Whelan said.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
William Trost Richards, a Philadelphia landscape painter of some renown during the late 19th century, enjoyed a working situation that few artists today are lucky enough to fall into. A wealthy patron, Philadelphia industrialist and art collector George Whitney, not only subsidized Richards and bought dozens of his oils and watercolors, but he also promoted the work among other collectors. The two were friends who corresponded regularly for about 10 years when Richards was out of the city.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. "I'M NOT anti-gun," insists Max Nacheman, the 26-year-old director of CeaseFirePA. "If people want to have guns, that's their thing," he says, walking to his Center City rowhouse on Sunday. What he is against, he says, are irresponsible gun-owners, people who use guns to kill or injure others, and "straw purchasers" - people who buy guns legally for the benefit of criminals.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
HARRISBURG - School boards may not cut the compensation of tax collectors to the point where the reductions prevent them from performing their duties, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court said Monday. The high court ruled unanimously that two Bucks County districts went too far when they sharply reduced the rate by which their tax collectors are paid, imposing cuts of 69 percent and 79 percent. Fifteen tax collectors in Bucks County sued the Pennridge and Central Bucks School Districts after they passed resolutions in 2009 that cut their compensation, which is based on a per-bill fee. A county judge sided with the tax collectors, but a Commonwealth Court panel reversed the ruling in 2010.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josephine "Jody" Senner Craul, 86, a community volunteer and antiques collector who won ribbons for miniature flower arrangements and pressed-plant art at the Philadelphia Flower Show, died Sunday, July 29, of complications from arteriosclerosis at Southampton Estates, a retirement community in Southampton. Mrs. Craul was active with local garden clubs and was a volunteer and exhibitor at the Philadelphia Flower Show for more than 30 years, her son, Bruce, said. The flower beds she tended at her longtime home in Southampton were photographed for garden publications, he said.
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