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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, when inflation was rampant and memories of Watergate and the Vietnam War were still raw, Pat Toomey spent part of each school day in a high school history classroom quietly seething. It was the teacher who got under his skin. Too many lectures were about capitalism's failings, corruption in Washington, or how America was no better than the Soviet Union. None of it squared with Toomey's patriotic take on U.S. history or his budding conservative ideology. "I felt we were a great, great country, a great civilization," said Toomey, 42, who has represented the Lehigh Valley and parts of Montgomery County in the House of Representatives since 1999.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | by Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
Division III schools don't draw the country's premier athletes. That's pretty hard to do when you can't offer scholarships. Most athletes that go the D-III route do so because they want to be able to play more than one sport, stay closer to home or simply because they aren't good enough to play at a higher level. Don't tell that to the women athletes at the College of New Jersey. This past school year, the 10 women's programs compiled a 121-31-1 record, competed in seven NCAA tournaments, captured two national second-place finishes, one third-place and won 43 of 49 events in the highly competitive New Jersey Athletic Conference.
NEWS
April 15, 1986
I am almost 60 years old, never graduated from high school, but recently I really got an education. A television reporter was interviewing students at Temple University in regard to having wine and beer on campus. One brilliant student made the statement that having beer and wine on campus is what college is all about. Isn't that odd - I always thought the purpose of college was for an education. Margaret J. Roberts Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1986 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
Now that the long holiday vacation has ended, the Super Bowl is history and all that looms ahead are winter weather and long hours in the library, more than a few college students are wondering how long they and their school can stand one another - and whether they wouldn't be better off somewhere else. By this point in the school year, libraries have become zoos and dorm rooms feel like cages. Idiosyncracies that were charming in a roommate last fall are now motives for murder.
LIVING
August 9, 1987 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
College interviews are a sport almost any high school senior can learn to play competently, even gracefully. As in tennis or badminton, quality depends on the skill of both sides, and a sparkling volley is exhilarating. But in interviews, players aren't adversaries. Ideally, each helps the other play his or her best - and learn in the process whether a student and a college are right for each other. And both can win, even if one or the other decides that the answer is no. College interviews may sound about as thrilling as root-canal work, but, actually, most are a lot of fun. Championship play during interviewing means knowing the rules, so here are some tips to help your game.
SPORTS
April 27, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
St. Joseph's Prep offensive lineman Mark Arcidiacono will announce his college destination in a press conference at his school on Wednesday at 1 p.m. Arcidiacono, a 6-foot-5, 285-pound junior who has 11 scholarship offers, said yesterday that he has narrowed his choices to Penn State, Florida and Rutgers. "I want to get the decision behind me so I can concentrate on my senior football season," the 17-year-old from Holland, Bucks County, said. Arcidiacono, the oldest of eight children, attended spring football games at Florida and Penn State.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
These South Jersey players have committed to attend colleges on baseball scholarships. Player   High school   College    Christian Adorno   St. Augustine   Wilmington    Frank Angeloni   Highland   Concordia    Tom Bradway   Mainland   Lafayette    Barry Buchowski   St. Augustine   Tulane    Nick Cieri   Rancocas Valley   Maryland    Trevor Datz   Pitman   Univ. of Sciences    Jarrett DeHart   Shawnee   Louisiana State    Derek DeMaria   Gloucester Catholic   Philadelphia    Troy Dixon   Egg Harbor Twp.   St.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | by Shantee Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
When she grows up, 12-year-old Lisa Womack wants to be a landscaper, hospital worker or telephone operator. College might help her expand her dreams. With the help of a new grant program, Lisa and many other city students will get extra help toward their education. "This is not a sprint. This is a long-distance run," said U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., of Philadelphia, at a press conference yesterday introducing his "Gear Up" grant program. The program works with low-income students, beginning no later than seventh grade.
NEWS
December 9, 1989
Everybody wants to be fancy. Especially schools. So there's a move afoot to allow virtually all the colleges in New Jersey to call themselves universities. Nothing else will change. They won't get any bigger or any better. They will just have fancy new names. This could come through that great academician, Assemblyman John Rocco of Cherry Hill, who wants to remove virtually all restrictions on the use of the term "university" - for marketing purposes. Rocco notes that 40 percent of New Jersey kids go out of state to college, failing to note that a kid who's off to Yale will not go to Jersey City State College even if you rename it Oxford University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
To help students recovering from substance abuse, the College of New Jersey last school year set aside substance-free housing exclusively for their use, expecting to create a supportive community. The response was, to put it mildly, weak: Only one student signed up, living in "Lion's House" for one semester. "We opened up the door and we thought they would come flooding in," said Christopher Freeman, who joined TCNJ last year to create and run the collegiate recovery program . After all, Freeman said, student surveys showed about 280 students on campus, 4 percent of the population, identified as being in recovery.
SPORTS
August 15, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Because of salary-cap restraints, Flyers general manager Ron Hextall didn't make a big splash in the offseason. That could change Monday, though Hextall faces difficult odds as he tries to sign gifted Harvard left winger Jimmy Vesey. Vesey, the Hobey Baker winner as collegiate hockey's top player last season, becomes an unrestricted free agent Monday, and he has many teams courting him. If the Flyers are able to sign him, he could land a spot in their top six this season.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
College life used to be so spartan. Residents couldn't even hang pictures on their dorm room walls. Now it's easier than ever for scholars to stay connected, with variants on the smart gadgets they've grown accustomed to having at home. Some even keep parents and friends plugged in . . . at a distance. Dorm room 2.0. A boring dorm room can earn an instant, sexy makeover, just by slapping a motorized Switchmate Smart Light Switch atop the faceplate of a standard light switch (toggle or rocker)
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As a pregnant faculty member at Community College of Philadelphia six years ago, Kristy Shuda McGuire would walk through "clouds of smoke" to get into her building. "It really bothered me," said McGuire, an associate biology professor. The college had a ban on smoking inside buildings and near entrances, but that left a lot of areas of campus vulnerable. McGuire got herself on the college's business affairs committee, which deals with building usage, and pushed for tighter restrictions.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By Robert G. Duffett Hillary Clinton recently unveiled her New College Compact. The goal is college affordability by ensuring free tuition at four-year public colleges for every student from families earning $85,000 a year or less. The family income cap would rise to $125,000 by the year 2021. The compact would primarily be funded by the federal government through "new money" appropriations from yet unidentified tax-benefit limitations on high-income taxpayers. State governments, universities, and parents would also be required to contribute.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
A new law to help prevent suicide by students at New Jersey colleges brings needed attention to an important campus issue, school administrators said, while also giving them support to expand services. Gov. Christie last week signed into law the Madison Holleran Suicide Prevention Act, named after a 19-year-old University of Pennsylvania student from Bergen County who killed herself in 2014 in Philadelphia. "An institution of higher education shall have individuals with training and experience in mental-health issues who focus on reducing student suicides and attempted suicides available on campus or remotely by telephone or other means for students 24 hours a day, seven days a week," the law reads . The law also requires schools to train faculty and staff to recognize suicide warning signs and to email students each semester with contact information for the trained staffers.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Mari Schaefer, Staff Writer
Delaware County Community College graduates are now able to seamlessly transfer to Pennsylvania State University under a recently announced agreement. Students with majors in bachelor of science in biology or business, and bachelor of arts or science in psychology, and have a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 are eligible. Application fees to the university also will be waived, according to officials. Officials noted that Penn State Brandywine in Media, offers the eligible majors and is located close to the DCCC main campus in Marple Township.
TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Erica Lamberg, For The Inquirer
It's been more than 16 years since we took a vacation alone with just one of our children, not counting an overnight college visit or baseball tournament. My husband and I are blessed with a daughter, Hannah, 18, and a son, Jared, 15. We always traveled as a family, and those vacations were among our happiest days together as I reflect on my motherhood years. My daughter leaves in August for the University of Florida in Gainesville. For the last seven summers, both of our children went to overnight camp.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders move to make free college a key piece of the Democratic platform, officials at some public colleges around the region are hopeful that at the very least the effort will keep the issue of cost in the spotlight. "I believe it's a movement that's not going to just die with the election," said Kenneth Witmer Jr., dean of West Chester University's College of Education and Social Work. "I think we'll see pressure - from both those who want to go to college and those who came out owing a lot of money - on politicians to respond to this.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
One New Jersey delegate to this week's Democratic National Convention began considering a possible Bernie Sanders presidential run a couple of years ago, while attending the Gloucester County Institute of Technology. "Someone asked me, 'Do you think Bernie is going to run for president?' " recalled Cory Monteleone-Haught, who, as a high school senior in 2014, was already a fan of the Vermont senator. "I said, 'Eh, maybe. I don't know what kind of support he'd get.' " When Sanders announced his candidacy the following April, Monteleone-Haught, of Glassboro, lined up to donate.
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