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NEWS
August 28, 1986
The Aug. 18 editorial "Maryland earns high five" was unbelievable. As stated, Maryland did bad things. It recruited functionally illiterate athletes, taught them nothing except the sport involved, used and discarded still functionally illiterate students. All this bad stuff, exposed by the Bias scandal, is now finished, you say, "dramatically. " Maryland will now adjust its basketball schedule to facilitate study, and provide a vaguely described academic support system. Bravo! Maryland will lead the other colleges, sinners all, from the wilderness.
SPORTS
March 19, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
That the fields where college sports are played have been mangled by scandal is the general theme of a report on reshaping college athletics that will be issued today in Washington by the Knight Foundation's Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. The commission is a 22-member panel composed primarily of college administrators and private businessmen. In the 1980s, 109 colleges and universities were censured, sanctioned or put on probation by the NCAA. They included 57 of the 106 universities playing Division I-A football.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | By Larry Atkins
Everyone in big-time college basketball and football seems to be raking in the dough. The NCAA has an eight-year, $1.7 billion contract with CBS for the Division I men's basketball tournament. Teams get barrels of money for appearing on television, or making a football bowl appearance. Dozens of coaches at elite Division I programs basketball make at least $100,000 per year from shoe companies merely for having their teams wear the companies' shoes. Everyone is profiting, it seems, except the athletes, who make the bonanza possible.
SPORTS
March 7, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
Three out of four Americans think college athletics have gotten out of control, according to a poll made public yesterday. "We have found that some groups who are widely thought to be major stalwarts and boosters of big-time athletics are . . . deeply disturbed at what they see today," said Louis Harris, chairman of Louis Harris and Associates, the New York-based organization that conducted the poll. The poll was ordered by the Knight Commission, a non-profit organization that has studied problems in college athletics since January 1990 and is expected to make reform proposals in a report to be issued later this month.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are no unforgettable images of it burned into America's collective consciousness, like that of sprinters John Carlos and Tommie Smith standing, heads bowed and black fists raised, on the Olympic medal platform in 1968. Nevertheless, the story of the 1965-66 Texas Western basketball team served as a transcendent moment in sports history. Unless you're over 50, you probably don't know much about the scrappy Miners of coach Don Haskins, who not only beat Kentucky to win the 1965-66 NCAA championship for Texas Western College (now the University of Texas at El Paso)
SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Columnist
IF YOU have been around college sports as long as I have, you meet every imaginable kind of person - some with agendas, others who are in it just for themselves, overmatched incompetents. You also get to know people like Vince Nicastro, who is everything good about college athletics - honest, fair-minded, reasonable and terrific at his job. When it was announced yesterday that Nicastro, the Villanova athletics director for 15 years, will be leaving his job sometime soon to become the associate director of the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova School of Law, I felt good for Vince and his family because that is what they want.
SPORTS
July 20, 1993 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Tarman, the Penn State athletic director for 11 years and an administrator in the school's athletic department for a total of 35 years, announced his retirement yesterday. Tarman, 65, said he would step down as soon as a successor was found, probably by Dec. 31. "I could have done this in 1991, but I wanted to see the Big Ten thing through to its inception," Tarman said, referring to Penn State's entry into the Big Ten, which will be complete this fall when the football team begins conference play.
SPORTS
May 18, 1988 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Monday's controversy became yesterday's resolution between the University of Kansas and Temple regarding their Dec. 10 basketball date - sponsored by the Showboat Hotel and Casino - in Atlantic City's Convention Hall. Bob Frederick, athletic director at Kansas, released a statement Monday saying that he "had no knowledge of the sponsorship of this game by an outside agency" and "we have obvious concerns about the involvement of casino gambling in college athletics. " "I spoke with him today, and we've cleared things up," said Charles Theokas, Temple's athletic director.
NEWS
March 4, 2005 | By Eric A. Zillmer
To restore a sense of integrity to college athletics' poor graduation rates, especially in basketball and football, the NCAA has initiated a new program: the Academic Progress Rate, or APR. Under the leadership of former Indiana University president and current NCAA president Myles Brand, an NCAA committee on academic performance was established. During the committee's most recent meeting in January, an academic performance "cut" score was established to penalize intercollegiate athletic programs that perform poorly on graduation rates, retention and eligibility.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite frequent calls for reform, the disconnect between college athletics and academics remains significant, according to a survey by the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics that was released here yesterday. The topic of a daylong discussion at the National Press Club, the nationwide survey of 2,071 faculty members suggested a widespread cynicism among professors over the growth and impact of the $8 billion-a-year college sports business. It depicted an educational landscape in which academics resent the multimillion-dollar salaries paid to football and basketball coaches, believe sports decisions are driven not by college administrators but by the entertainment industry, and feel that athletics get priority over education.
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SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Columnist
IF YOU have been around college sports as long as I have, you meet every imaginable kind of person - some with agendas, others who are in it just for themselves, overmatched incompetents. You also get to know people like Vince Nicastro, who is everything good about college athletics - honest, fair-minded, reasonable and terrific at his job. When it was announced yesterday that Nicastro, the Villanova athletics director for 15 years, will be leaving his job sometime soon to become the associate director of the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova School of Law, I felt good for Vince and his family because that is what they want.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
SOME NEWS items from the past week: Roy Williams, the head basketball coach at the University of North Carolina, was accused by Rashad McCants, a former star player, of encouraging academic fraud. A few days later, John Calipari signed a 7-year, $52.5 million contract to remain the University of Kentucky head basketball coach after reportedly turning down a $60 million offer to be coach and president of the NBA Cleveland Cavaliers for the same time period. On Monday, the NCAA announced a $20 million settlement with former and current players seeking to be compensated by the use of their images and likenesses in video games.
SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
ACCORDING to a Wall Street Journal report about his new book, Memphis coach John Calipari has the metaphor exactly right when he says that the NCAA is like the old Soviet Union in its final days: "It was still powerful. It could still hurt you. But you could see it crumbling, and it was just a matter of time before it either changed or ceased to exist. " This is correct. Here is the proposal: That the NCAA put itself out of business. What would replace it would not be a large umbrella organization but a series of individual sports/sports group organizations.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do exotic dancers, Sleepy's mattress delivery men, graduate assistants, FedEx drivers, cleaning contractors, student interns, carpenters, and college football players have in common? They are all struggling, in some legal way, to determine whether they are employees or something else all together. Is the exotic dancer actually an independent contractor, running her own tip-generating business and leasing pole space from an adult entertainment bar? Or is she an employee, working assigned hours and wearing (or not wearing)
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IT HAS BEEN a week now since football players at Northwestern legally won the right to be called "employees" of the university and form a union to negotiate their compensation/working conditions. That decision came from a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board. Exactly what that's going to mean, nobody really knows for sure. It's probably the beginning of a lengthy process that will make some lawyers a lot of money. Yet it also has the potential to change - dramatically or otherwise - the landscape of college athletics.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a landmark case that has the potential to change the lives of college athletes, a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday that Northwestern University football players are employees of the school, entitled to hold an election to form a union. The ruling by Peter Sung Ohr in Chicago is subject to an NLRB appeals process, and experts predicted it will wind up in the courts for years, possibly ending up in the Supreme Court. Northwestern's football players are the first in college sports to seek union representation.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David P. O'Brien, 57, of Lower Gwynedd, a college sports executive and educator for more than two decades, died Saturday, March 1, of cancer at his home. Born in Montclair, N.J., Mr. O'Brien graduated from Immaculate Conception High School, Moravian College with a bachelor's degree in political science, and Seton Hall University with a law degree. He worked as a high school teacher and coach before launching a career as an athletic director at Long Beach State University in 1991.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
KAIN COLTER, the quarterback at Northwestern, joined union leaders yesterday in Chicago to announce the creation of the College Athletes Players Association. He says the NCAA currently dictates conditions and added that athletes need "a seat at the table" to guarantee safeguards against injuries and to ensure adequate financial compensation. Ramogi Huma, president of the National College Players Association and a former linebacker at UCLA, filed the petition in Chicago on behalf of football players at Northwestern, submitting the form at the regional office of the NLRB.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
THE FIVE POWER conferences of college sports want more flexibility in providing financial support to athletes. A major reason they lack that freedom in the first place is other NCAA members have feared widening the wealthiest programs' competitive advantage. Now NCAA president Mark Emmert and the leaders of those behemoth leagues must convince schools with fewer resources that giving them greater autonomy is in the best interest of college athletics. "What's really hard in these kinds of things is for people to vote themselves less political authority," Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany . "They don't do that.
SPORTS
April 17, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
THESE DAYS in college athletics, coaches aren't the only recruiters. Right up there on the importance meter are players . . . even those who've yet to don a uniform. Thaddius Smith, a 5-10, 170-pound junior at Cardinal O'Hara High, Monday announced his commitment to Boston College. Quite crucial to the woo-him process, of course, were coach Steve Addazio and assistant Ryan Day (both formerly of Temple), but so were Marcus Outlow, a running back from Connecticut, and Darius Wade, a quarterback from Delaware.
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