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SPORTS
February 26, 1997 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a Villanova game, freshman Malik Allen doesn't scan the box score for the same numbers most players want to see. Rebounds are his thing. "My mentality is to go in the game and try to go after every ball that's there," said Allen, who will be in Morgantown, W. Va., tonight when the Wildcats play West Virginia. The 6-foot-10 power forward from Shawnee High averages more rebounds per minute than any of the Wildcats starters. He also scores fewer points per minute than anyone else on the team.
SPORTS
September 21, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
South Carolina coach Lou Holtz wants to give "Pops" a chance. He's waiting on the NCAA to agree. Holtz said yesterday 39-year-old walkon receiver Tim Frisby, nicknamed "Pops," will get to play for South Carolina this season once his eligibility is approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse. South Carolina athletic spokesman Kerry Tharp said the review of Frisby's academic work is standard and the school expects no problems. Frisby recently retired from the U.S. Army, where he was a Ranger-qualified military man with the 82nd Airborne.
SPORTS
August 19, 1993 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Keon Clark, a 6-11 center from Danville (Ill.) High who signed a national letter of intent to play basketball for Temple this season, will not be able to honor that commitment because he failed to attain the grade-point average in his core-course curriculum necessary to accept a scholarship. According to Owls coach John Chaney, Clark did reach the NCAA's required minimum of 700 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. "Right now, he's looking into what the alternatives are," Chaney said.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
WHEN I entered Temple in September of 1956, I was not required to take what was then called the College Boards because I finished in the upper 25 percent of my class at South Philadelphia High School. Temple required only that I take placements tests for English and math. Forgive me, then, if I'm puzzled by Dom Giordano's concerns that Temple's decision to forego the SATs is going to dilute the quality of its student body. I agree with Giordano that an "A" at a suburban high school may be worth more than an "A" at an inner-city school, and that is also the problem.
SPORTS
August 1, 1990 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Big East will propose legislation intended to grant a fourth season of athletic eligibility to Proposition 48 students when the NCAA Council convenes today in Monterey, Calif. The purpose of the three-day meeting is to draft final legislation for a vote by the general membership at the 1991 NCAA Convention, which will be held in Nashville. The 60-member council is composed of academic and athletic representatives from NCAA schools. Titled "Partial or Non-qualifier," the Big East proposal would grant a fourth season of athletic eligibility to a student who had completed a minimum of 96 semester hours toward a baccalaureate degree by the beginning of the student's fifth academic year.
SPORTS
December 18, 1987 | By RAY DIDINGER, Daily News Sports Columnist
Rudy Glocker of Owen J. Roberts High School in Pottstown did not have much time to relax this football season, on the field or off. On the field, Glocker, a 6-7, 225-pounder, played both ways at tight end and linebacker. Off the field, he was an honor student with college recruiters lined up at his door. "I used to get to bed around 10 p.m.," Glocker said, "but I'm lucky if I make it by midnight now. If it went like this the whole year, I'd probably keel over. " Things figure to settle down around Feb. 10 when Glocker announces his college choice.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Raymond S. Fleck, 70, a priest, teacher and trained hypnotist who occasionally used hypnosis on his students at Northeast Catholic High School, died of heart failure Friday at St. Catherine Hall, a nursing facility for priests in Germantown. Years ago, Father Fleck, a member of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, took a night course in hypnosis at a high school. He continued his study of the subject and eventually became president of the Association to Advance Ethical Hypnosis, an organization that sought to legitimize hypnotists and "get the quacks out of it," a friend said.
SPORTS
April 29, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
The St. Joseph's basketball program signed its fifth recruit yesterday, 5-9 guard Mark Bass, a postgraduate student at Maine Central Institute. The Hawks pursued Bass last year, when he played as a senior at McCorristin High School in Trenton. But when Bass failed to reach the required minimum on his college boards, he opted to spend the season at MCI, in hopes of improving those scores. A 3.0 student, he is now eligible to play next season. Bass averaged 14 points a game, the third best on a team that had eight players average between 10 and 17 and will send all 11 of its players to the Division I level on a scholarship.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just last month, Kendra Abdulwali ripped open a letter from Howard University and beamed. The senior at Chester High Academy had been selected to participate in the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students. A full four-year scholarship to Howard was hers. Within days, however, Abdulwali got a second letter: The scholarship had been canceled. The reason? Chester Upland School District officials had failed to mail the necessary paperwork in time to meet the application deadline.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Deborah S. Weiner, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Moreland School District anticipates several major curriculum changes to bolster liberal-arts programs and language skills in the 1990-1991 school year, according to James O. Lee, assistant superintendent. Lee said the curriculum committee is evaluating existing programs and designing new ones that it will propose in language arts, English and social studies. "We are strengthening our curriculum and establishing higher standards," Lee told the school board Tuesday.
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NEWS
August 12, 2014
WHEN I entered Temple in September of 1956, I was not required to take what was then called the College Boards because I finished in the upper 25 percent of my class at South Philadelphia High School. Temple required only that I take placements tests for English and math. Forgive me, then, if I'm puzzled by Dom Giordano's concerns that Temple's decision to forego the SATs is going to dilute the quality of its student body. I agree with Giordano that an "A" at a suburban high school may be worth more than an "A" at an inner-city school, and that is also the problem.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Board of City Trusts continues working on a comprehensive plan to preserve the educational mission of Girard College in a time of tighter resources, but it has no plans to close or move the urban boarding school from its 43-acre campus in North Philadelphia. "Our highest priority is to ensure that Girard can flourish at its present location for decades to come," Ronald R. Donatucci, president, wrote in a letter circulated Monday to the Girard community. Over the next several months, he said, the board and the Girard community will discuss "a variety of programmatic options, some of which may be dramatically different from Girard's current operations, as we chart a course for the school's future.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY& JAN RANSOM, luceyc@phillynews.com215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER'S decision to appoint himself and several top aides to the board of the Community College of Philadelphia had tongues wagging Thursday, with some wondering if the institution's longtime president would be next to see the door. Nutter said he simply wants to get more involved with the college. But when asked if President Stephen Curtis had his full backing, his remarks were lukewarm. "Yeah. I mean, the board decides who the president is," Nutter said. "He has a contract.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Amy Gutmann was one of 30 private-college executives who received more than $1 million in total compensation, according to a new report by the Chronicle of Higher Education. The study covers the 2008-09 school year and includes 448 private-college presidents. Gutmann actually slipped from being the 12th-highest-compensated president nationally the year before, when her compensation also topped $1 million, to 15th in the latest survey. Her total compensation was reported as $1,367,004, with $893,030 of that in wages.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
Nicole Lister is a sophomore political science/pre-law major in a B.A./J.D. program at Rutgers in Camden Vote for the candidate who will follow through on his or her promises, the one whose policies will actually be implemented and not just exist in a 30-second television sound bite. The issues are what they've always been - national security, the economy, abortion and gay rights. What makes it or breaks it for a candidate is whether or not they can follow through. When I voted in the Jersey primary, I punched the ballot for the candidate I believe will do this - the one whose broken promises we won't have to sweep up four years from now. Sean Coit is a junior at St. Joseph's and editor of the Hawk newspaper The struggling economy is at the heart of many of America's problems, and my vote will go for the candidate who provides a calculated, realistic plan to regain the nation's financial stability.
NEWS
March 28, 2008
Sarah Caldwell recently graduated with a degree in English from Bryn Mawr College and now works at a publishing house in New York Of course, I would like to believe that Americans are becoming color-blind in the same evolutionary way we first stood on two legs - but that just isn't the case. Race will be an issue as long as gender is an issue: Just look at all the anti-Hillary press. I went to a women's college at which diversity was valued as highly as education itself. Many of the faculty, students and staff made a conscious effort to raise racial and ethnic awareness every chance they got, and you know what?
NEWS
January 25, 2008
A new feature is starting on tomorrow's Editorial Page. Called "The College Board," it brings together writers in and just out of local colleges and universities. They'll be writing about the world from a perspective too often missing in today's opinion pages. Here's a yearbook-style introduction to board members. Read their work tomorrow and on selected Saturdays throughout the year. Aileen Bachant is a junior at Rowan majoring in journalism, specializing in print, editing and broadcast.
NEWS
February 23, 2005 | By Jim Sollisch
Starting next month, the Scholastic Aptitude Test will include a mandatory writing test. You'd think that would make us lovers of the liberal arts happy. Not me. In announcing the new writing test last fall, the College Board made it clear that its intention was to encourage more emphasis on writing in high school, which should make us happier still. Except that the standard for the test is the "five-paragraph essay," which, as a model, makes about as much sense as testing architects by asking them to design buildings using only five rectangles.
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