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November 8, 1991 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
College football fans who were willing to pay to watch the Nov. 16 Penn State-Notre Dame game on television can save their $9.95 for something else. ABC Sports announced yesterday that its plan to offer the game to about half the country on a pay-per-view basis had been abandoned. "We were told that it was called off because of technical problems," Penn State athletic director Jim Tarman said yesterday. "ABC felt that they couldn't do a very good job with such a short time frame.
SPORTS
December 6, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like Christmas sales and shortened days, the Army-Navy game is an early December fixture. The colorful event, to be contested for the 109th time this afternoon at Lincoln Financial Field, has been played in all but five of the last 100 Decembers. World War I canceled it in 1917 and 1918. The 1928 and 1929 games never took place because of institutional disagreements over eligibility rules. In each of those cases, however, it was understood that the annual football meeting of military academies one day would be resumed.
SPORTS
August 25, 2007
The Inquirer previews the 2007 college football season, starting with a series on the area's Heisman hopefuls: The senior linebacker remembers playing Pop Warner in Wallingford, Delaware County. The senior quarterback was lightly recruited at Penn Charter. The former Conwell-Egan star running back, now a junior, also drew little interest. WEDNESDAY, RAY RICE, RUTGERS: The junior running back makes it a trio.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | BY ALLEN BARRA, From the New York Times
Some time soon, perhaps within a few days, Eric Ramsey, a former Auburn University football player, will spin some tapes in public that could shake the foundation of college football. Ramsey has apparently taped more than 100 hours of conversations with Auburn coaches, alumni and even the head coach Pat Dye. They catalogue more violations concerning his own wages and working conditions than the National Collegiate Athletic Association can shake a stick at (But, rest assured, the NCAA will find a bigger stick)
SPORTS
June 27, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - College football will finally have a playoff. Come 2014, the BCS is dead. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in two years. "A four team playoff doesn't go too far," Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger said. "It goes just the right amount. " The move completes a six-month process for the commissioners, who have been working on a new way to determine a major college football champion after years of griping from fans.
NEWS
July 24, 1987
The latest in college football scandals is now emerging in Chicago where a grand jury is investigating agents who signed athletes to professional contracts while the athletes were still in school by offering money (and possibly other emoluments). The theme of corruption and college athletics is hardly a new one. Last fall the big story was payments to athletes at Southern Methodist University, a scandal so large that it resulted in the cancellation of the school's 1987 season. The year before that the University of Georgia lost a lawsuit filed by a faculty member fired for refusing to give football players undeserved passing grades in their remedial reading classes.
NEWS
November 11, 1987 | By the Rev. William J. Byron
What if academic football ended its season each year on Thanksgiving weekend? Academic football? That's the fall sport which is neither professional nor commercial; it is part of the educational experience available to participants and observers under the auspices of accredited academic institutions. It is also called college football. If academic football ceased at the end of November, student-athletes and student-fans would have more time for study - a consummation devoutly to be wished by those whose primary concern is the academic welfare of an entire student body.
SPORTS
August 25, 2002 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pigskin Tidbits Biggest waste of money in college football Not an easy award to win, but the University of Oregon comes through with its $250,000 billboard in midtown Manhattan, paid for by boosters, proclaiming, "We're Back!" This after Oregon QB Joey Harrington was draped on a building across the street from Madison Square Garden all last season. Best spoof Iowa State produced brochures with banners of quarterback Seneca Wallace hanging from the Eiffel Tower, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and the Sphinx.
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SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
INDIANAPOLIS - Arkansas coach Bret Bielema has proposed a college football rules change that would slow down hurry-up offenses, by allowing the defense at least 10 seconds to substitute, before the next play is run. Obviously, if college football goes that way, there's a chance the movement will spread to the NFL, where teams such as the Eagles have been known to make playing uptempo a key component of their approach. Eagles coach Chip Kelly hasn't spoken to reporters at the NFL Scouting Combine, but one of Kelly's friends, who has a similar mindset, said yesterday he doesn't much like the idea, particularly in the pros.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Dan Norton, For The Inquirer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - James Franklin pulled out all the stops when he welcomed his first recruits to Penn State. Wednesday was college football's national signing day, when high school players made their commitments official, and Franklin introduced the Nittany Lions' newest 25 players that evening at the Bryce Jordan Center. In front of a "whiteout" crowd, Franklin described each of Penn State's incoming freshmen for next season. Twenty players faxed in their signatures to the coaching staff that morning.
SPORTS
January 20, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
So Penn Staters, you're still ticked at Bill O'Brien for bolting to Houston after just two years - but perfectly fine with James Franklin's leaving Vanderbilt after three seasons and poaching every Vandy recruit he can get? It's natural if that, in fact, is exactly how you feel. That's certainly Franklin's position. Franklin makes it clear that he doesn't really buy into the idea that his recruits are actually going to a school for a particular education only available at that school.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Turner Classic Movies, the cable network that is a welcome antidote to 24/7 news, reality shows, and ESPN's smarm, recently ran a half day's worth of old college football movies. All were as awful as they were alike: State U. gets football hero. State U. loses football hero. State U. finds football hero in the nick of time. Throw in the dithering dean's blond daughter, an intellectually challenged lineman or two, sneering gamblers, and the familiar plots were complete. There was, however, one other recurring and relevant element to these cornball films, most of which were nearly 80 years old - the corruption of collegiate sports.
SPORTS
December 12, 2013 | By the Inquirer Staff
Former Temple coach Wayne Hardin was among 14 inductees into the College Football Hall of Fame at an awards dinner Tuesday night in New York. Hardin, 86, coached the Owls from 1970 to 1982. He is the winningest coach in Temple history, with a 80-52-3 record in 13 seasons. As head coach at Navy from 1959 to 1964, Hardin directed the Midshipmen's only two Heisman Trophy winners, Joe Bellino (1960) and Roger Staubach (1963). Hardin ranks fifth at Navy in wins (38). His teams beat Army in five of his six seasons.
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
UNITED STATES Naval Academy senior wide receiver and co-captain Matt Aiken recalled the first time he truly realized that the Army-Navy game was infinitely bigger than any other football rivalry. That moment of clarification had come at a most inopportune time. "My first play in an Army-Navy game was in my freshman year [2010]," Aiken said. "I was setting up to return a punt, and I looked up into the stands, saw all the Navy guys, all the Army guys, realized that all of America was watching.
SPORTS
November 27, 2013 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
RON COHEN'S office at George Washington High resembles more of a football museum than it does a work station. Sure, there is a desk with a computer, but the eye immediately heads to its shelves, chockablock with memorabilia from this and that. Game balls encased in glass, game films stacked like dominos, game-worn jerseys, signed and framed with nowhere to hang, so they just sit proudly on display near the door. Ironically, sandwiched between times-gone-by, sat senior Zaire Hollerway, a 6-1, 280-pound offensive/defensive lineman whose football career growing up was nearly history.
SPORTS
November 11, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
To: Charles Eliot, President of Harvard (1869-1909) Re: Banning football Sorry, Charlie. Turns out you and all those other high-collared, high-minded, Gilded Age reformers were right when it came to football. More than a century ago, when you were calling for its prohibition, you better understood the nature of the game than we do today. You saw the grim toll of injury and death and weren't afraid to call the sport "barbaric. " You condemned it as "a fight whose strategy and ethics are those of war. " And, unlike your successors as America's university presidents, you weren't afraid to call for its abolition.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State senior guard John Urschel has been named a National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete, one of 16 football student-athletes chosen from across all NCAA and NAIA divisions, the NFF announced Thursday. Urschel, who was named an Academic All-American last year, receives an $18,000 scholarship for post-graduate studies with the award, and also is a finalist for the William V. Campbell Trophy presented to the nation's top college football scholar-athlete. The winner of the Campbell award, which carries an additional $25,000 post-graduate scholarship, will be announced Dec. 10 in New York where Urschel and the other scholar-athlete winners will be honored.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Staff Writer
ALABAMA, OREGON, Ohio State. It's no great shock that all three are still unbeaten. The same could even apply to Florida State, if you didn't think that trip to Clemson was going to get in the way. But hey, 'Bama could have lost at Texas A&M. OSU could've lost at Northwestern. Oregon could've lost at Washington. OK, maybe not so much. Then you've got (in poll order) Missouri, Baylor, Miami and Texas Tech, each also and-0. Sometimes you don't know. Missouri won at Georgia but lost its quarterback and used a freshman to beat Florida at home by 19. Now the Tigers host South Carolina, which saw its QB leave in a loss at Tennessee.
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