CollectionsCollege Fund
IN THE NEWS

College Fund

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's historically black colleges will gain significant visibility and clout when U.S. Rep. William H. Gray 3d takes the helm of the United Negro College Fund in September. Black educators from around the country hailed Gray's move to become president of the 47-year-old charitable fund, saying he would boost private giving to black colleges and be an effective lobbyist for their interests in Congress. Johnetta Cole, president of Spelman College, a historically black women's school in Atlanta, said Gray's appointment underscores the important role black colleges play in turning out future leaders.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Yvonne Roberts, coordinator for a local golf tournament that benefits the United Negro College Fund, has a problem that makes her the envy of other minority charity fund-raisers - too many donors. While other charitable organizations scramble for funds, Roberts said her third annual United Negro College Fund Celebrity Golf Tournament had to turn away people who wanted to donate money while playing a round. Each hole at the 18-hole Bala Golf and Country Club was sponsored by a different contributor.
NEWS
August 9, 2007 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A long-planned endowment program for Philadelphia students to attend college has gotten off the ground with a $300,000 gift from pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. Announced at a City Hall news conference yesterday, the money represents the first major corporate support of the CORE (College Opportunity Resources for Education) program started in 2004 through the leadership of Mayor Street and U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Phila.). Fattah said yesterday he hoped to help raise $200 million for the fund, which will be managed by Philadelphia-based Glenmede Trust Co. Until now, the scholarship program has been funded almost evenly by the city and the Philadelphia School District, which together have provided more than $15 million.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
The United Negro College Fund presents its annual fund-raiser/entertainment spectacular Sunday; "An Evening of Stars: A Celebration of Educational Excellence" airs 1-5 p.m. on WCAU (Channel 10). Designed to highlight 39 private, historically black member colleges and universities - as well as the achievements of the schools' students and graduates - this star-studded, four-hour affair will be hosted by singer Lou Rawls, producer/director Debbie Allen, radio commentator Tom Joyner and actress Jasmine Guy. Last year, a record $13.1 million in cash and pledges was raised as a result of the broadcast, which enabled the organization to administer the more than 400 educational programs that provide students access to higher education through scholarships and career opportunities.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | Daily News staff and wire services
William Gray III, president of the United Negro College Fund, continues to demonstrate his Midas touch on behalf of higher education for minorities. The former Philadelphia congressman yesterday announced that Microsoft Corp. and IBM have pledged $100 million in cash and equipment for students and faculty members at 39 black schools. AT&T is contributing $1 million, and the UNCF hopes to raise $29 million. "It is critically important that those who are coming out of these institutions have the technological skills that the society is going to demand in the 21st century," said Gray.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
So you think of Mayor Goode as stiff, straight and suited. If so, you wouldn't have recognized him last night jogging around in a pair of black-and-white satin shorts, frowning and strutting and waving a pair of boxing gloves with which, in three rounds, he "knocked out" Canadian heavyweight Donovan "Razor" Ruddock. The fake fight, which left Ruddock theatrically sprawled on the canvas in the AME Plaza in West Philadelphia, was a fund-raiser for the United Negro College Fund and the private Clara Muhammad Elementary and Secondary School at 48th Street and Wyalusing Avenue in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 21, 1986 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Annie D. Hyman, a parent with a large appetite for education, labored quietly as a community worker in Northwest Philadelphia. Then in 1975, she got an idea: Why not start a community-sponsored college-scholarship fund? It would not only raise money, but it also might get kids in District Four, one of the city's poorest and most densely populated school districts, interested in going to college. Yesterday, more than 1,000 people gathered at the Dunfey City Line Hotel to celebrate the 10th anniversary of that idea.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | Daily News Staff Report
The United Negro College Fund has entered into a partnership agreement with the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania to run joint fund-raising campaigns beginning this fall. The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) raises funds to support 41 private, historically black colleges and universities. The organization's alliance with United Way marks the first time the United Way has gotten involved in fund- raising for educational purposes. In the past, the fund-raising federation has focused exclusively on health and welfare agencies.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a bright April afternoon, less than a month before he would graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 1998, Harold Shields rode his bike from campus to his old elementary school in the woebegone neighborhood of Mantua, a mile and a world away. He found a bench on what passes for the playground - broken glass glinting on macadam, netless basketball hoops. There he sat, watching the children, writing poetry, and mulling the miracle that had happened at Belmont Elementary 11 years before.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The good news for historically black colleges these days is that enrollment continues to rise. The bad news is that such growth imposes pressure to invest in new dormitories and other campus facilities. Now, some financial help is on the way. The Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment this week awarded a $42 million grant to the United Negro College Fund to help its 39 member colleges with capital needs, student scholarship money, and opportunities for faculty training and curriculum development.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2015
I HEARD FROM quite a few readers following a column I wrote on helping young adults, especially recent college graduates. To recap, I suggested, among other things, that it's OK to allow a recent grad to live rent-free while he or she saves. I don't think parents should charge rent if an adult child is living at home with an aggressive plan to pay off student loans. I'm all for helping your children leave the nest. But if you can afford to give them help before they launch, it's not going to stifle their independence if they are otherwise financially responsible.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Home equity is a decent option to help finance a college education. "Traditionally, you can tap equity in your home to fund college," said Karen Robbins, with UBS's Philadelphia complex of 90 financial advisers. She also has clients with $250,000 to $500,000 of investable assets using it as collateral for lines of credit. For the rest of us, home-equity loans offer a fixed interest rate, averaging 6.79 percent for a $30,000 loan. Home-equity lines of credit (HELOCs) have a variable interest rate averaging about 4.57 percent, according to Bankrate.com.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden's largest charter network again is expanding its footprint: After purchasing a 1920s skyscraper for additional classroom space, it now is establishing an endowment for early-childhood education and college readiness, to the tune of $3 million. LEAP Academy University Charter purchased the nine-story Wilson Building in January and, on Tuesday, secured a bond not to exceed $10 million to complete renovations in the space, built for office and retail tenants. On Wednesday, officials gathered again, this time to celebrate receiving a $1.5 million matching grant.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A legal defense fund has been set up to help Barbara Mancini, the Philadelphia nurse charged with assisted suicide for giving her 93-year-old father morphine in February. The fund was created by Compassion & Choices, an advocacy group focused on giving dying people more control at the end of life. Mancini, 57, of Roxborough, has incurred more than $104,000 in legal fees, said her husband, Joe. "We are very grateful," he said Tuesday. He said he and his wife had paid attorney fees by draining their college fund and borrowing from family members whom they hope to repay.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MEET GARY PATEL, the most popular guy in Point Breeze. Owner of Federal Beer. Father of twin babies. Good dude. Also, Patel is about to bank a six-figure bonus after a Pennsylvania Lottery employee yesterday covertly verified that the $131.5 million winning Powerball ticket was bought at his store at 15th and Federal. The jackpot winner hasn't come forward yet, but the whole neighborhood seemed to have a spring in its step yesterday after the rain subsided and the TV news vans started rolling in, looking for Gary.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | BY CAROLYN HAX (INQUIRER)
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My parents asked us to match their contributions to our children's savings accounts. While this is well-intentioned advice, we are focusing (in our early 30s) on shoring up our retirement reserves and paying down debt. Not to mention, we both work, and two kids in day care is a significant expense that won't be there forever. I started explaining all this, and I think I did a decent job doing so, but realize I should have said something more along the lines of "If you want to contribute, that's great, but our financial decisions are our business.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DARRELLE REVIS has reportedly paid Buccaneers safety Mark Barron $50,000 for his jersey number. Revis, a cornerback, wore No. 24 for six seasons with the Jets. But after being traded to the Bucs in April he discovered that Barron already had that number. Paul Lukas of Uni- Watch.com, reported yesterday that Barron will wear No. 23 after accepting Revis' offer. "A well-placed source tells me that the amount Darrelle Revis paid to Mark Barron in order to get Barron to give up No. 24 was - get this - $50,000," Lukas wrote on his website.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
In 1979, when I entered Bryn Mawr College as a freshman, the most animalistic part of my experience was the cafeteria. Having been raised by an Italian woman, I was so used to good cooking that I'd already accumulated the "Freshman Fifteen" as a fifth-grader. Being forced to stand in line with strangers and beg for my morning granola was not my idea of freedom, academic or otherwise. Aside from that, the conditions of my life on that leafy Seven Sisters campus were essentially pleasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013
DEAR ABBY: Do women ever initiate sex with men, or must they always be wooed, cajoled, begged or persuaded? I have a fairly good physical relationship with my wife, but it happens only when I make the overtures. I am left with the conclusion that either the physical act isn't that enjoyable or I am not very desirable. If every encounter must start with me, and my wife can take it or leave it, is she just doing me a favor? Must sex always start with the guy, or can women demonstrate more overt interest?
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's colleges would need to meet performance-based targets to win new state funding under a recommendation by Gov. Corbett's commission on higher education. The proposal calls for "performance scorecards" that would take into account measures such as controlling tuition costs, opening access to low-income students and other underserved groups, and tailoring programs to meet workforce needs. Among other measures recommended for consideration are closing achievement gaps, on-time graduation rates, and contributions to the state's economic development.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|