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NEWS
December 6, 2011
By Steven Conn By hiring Urban Meyer to coach its football team for $4 million a year, Ohio State University has sent a powerful message to the college sports world, higher education, and the nation as a whole: After a year of unprecedented scandal in college athletics, the show will go on - bigger, brasher, and gaudier than ever! 2011 has been an annus horribilis in big-time college sports. As we reel over the sordid situation at Penn State - as well as the one at Syracuse - it's hard to remember that this year of scandal began in Columbus, Ohio.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Dan Porterfield
Many believe that liberal-arts colleges, which typically play sports at the Division III level, do not especially value athletics. We're therefore seen as having nothing practical to contribute to the national debate about the problems of high-profile, high-revenue, Division I college sports - including unethical behavior among coaches and boosters, erosion of academic values, special treatment of players, and cutthroat competition among the major...
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Characterizing the world of big-time college sports as a "disgraceful environment" rife with excesses of professionalism, commercialization and academic abuse, a high-profile commission issued a stinging rebuke yesterday that cast a shadow on the future of intercollegiate athletics. The 27-member Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, made up of educators and athletic officials, concluded that its 18-month investigation had discovered a system "in direct conflict with nearly every value that should matter to higher education.
SPORTS
February 2, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Kevin Pendergast, 28, who spent two months in prison for his role in fixing three Big Ten basketball games in 1995, lent his story and his support to a bill introduced yesterday that would ban betting on college sports. The point-shaving scheme that landed Pendergast in a federal prison began with illegal bribes to Northwestern basketball players and ended with his cohort doing something legal - walking into a Las Vegas casino and placing bets on the fixed games. "Without Nevada, without the option of betting money in Nevada, the Northwestern basketball point-shaving scandal would not have occurred," Pendergast said.
NEWS
October 9, 1986 | By Howard Means
A while back I spent some time talking with a guy I'll call Charlie here. A decade earlier Charlie had been, by common consent, one of the best high- school basketball players of his generation in Washington, an area long in schoolboy hardcourt history. A college coach who had seen Charlie play in high school, and later went on to win an NCAA basketball championship, agreed. So did two general managers in the National Basketball Association, who had seen him in the local summmer leagues.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Turner Classic Movies, the cable network that is a welcome antidote to 24/7 news, reality shows, and ESPN's smarm, recently ran a half day's worth of old college football movies. All were as awful as they were alike: State U. gets football hero. State U. loses football hero. State U. finds football hero in the nick of time. Throw in the dithering dean's blond daughter, an intellectually challenged lineman or two, sneering gamblers, and the familiar plots were complete. There was, however, one other recurring and relevant element to these cornball films, most of which were nearly 80 years old - the corruption of collegiate sports.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | By B. G. KELLEY
Let's not kid ourselves - Division I college sports is a business, a big business. Athletes are recruited to help to boost the coffers and prestige of their college, and they do that by winning on the field or court. Let's not kid ourselves. If the athletes don't do their job - and competing in top-level college sports is a job, no less so than teaching a class - the coach will lose his job because he's branded as a loser. He can argue, as Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps did a few seasons back, that all of his players graduated - a boast few other top-level coaches could make.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | BY SANDY GRADY
When I made a living at the sports writing dodge, college basketball tournaments brought the best time of the year. There was nothing to match the heart-clanging intensity of kids from Carolina, Kansas and Kentucky in the white-hot arenas at season's end. Even the Super Bowl and World Series seemed jaded - too much hype and money obsession - compared to the desperate innocence of gut-busting collegians going flat out for honor and a trophy....
SPORTS
July 22, 2011
AS A GENERAL philosophy, if I'm looking for leadership in the fight against the corruption in collegiate athletics, I'm not turning to the Southeastern Conference. I'd guess that three-quarters of the rules in the NCAA handbook probably were written to deal with violations committed by SEC programs. But in a room full of skunks, it doesn't take all that much to smell better than everybody else. So kudos to SEC commissioner Mike Slive on Wednesday for not just acknowledging that there are some serious issues in collegiate athletics, but also for putting out some actual suggestions to help cure them.
SPORTS
January 6, 2013
Beyond the political questions involved in the lawsuit Gov. Corbett filed last week against the NCAA (like how is this suit supposed to make him look good politically?) . . . Beyond the questions of whether the state has standing to file the suit . . . Beyond resurrecting the shameful misconduct on the part of Penn State officials in the Jerry Sandusky scandal . . . The college sports world will watch all developments in this suit closely. If this case ever gets to a courtroom, the consequences could go far beyond Happy Valley.
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SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Columnist
IF YOU have been around college sports as long as I have, you meet every imaginable kind of person - some with agendas, others who are in it just for themselves, overmatched incompetents. You also get to know people like Vince Nicastro, who is everything good about college athletics - honest, fair-minded, reasonable and terrific at his job. When it was announced yesterday that Nicastro, the Villanova athletics director for 15 years, will be leaving his job sometime soon to become the associate director of the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova School of Law, I felt good for Vince and his family because that is what they want.
SPORTS
April 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last July, when Penn State finally replaced an interim athletic director who had endured 987 days in the turbulent wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, it hired a woman. A year earlier, when a videotaped tirade by the men's basketball coach surfaced and cost Rutgers' athletic director his job, the New Jersey school did the same. So did Arizona State in 2005 after a football player was charged with murder. When other Division I schools, such as Penn and Eastern Michigan, have experienced sharp downturns in athletic fortunes, they too have turned to women to reinvigorate their slumping programs.
SPORTS
February 27, 2015
IT'S AN INTERESTING proposal. Last week, The Diamondback - the University of Maryland student newspaper of which I am proud alum - broke a story that the Big Ten Conference was going to discuss making football and men's basketball players spend a year in college before they would be eligible to compete. Certainly, a lot of ground must be covered between discussing a "Year of Readiness" proposal to something concrete actually happening, but I would ask, "Why not?" I understand the concerns, and if I were a men's basketball or football coach in the Big Ten, I'd be just like Michigan State basketball coach Tom Izzo in saying, "I'm not sure I'd do that.
SPORTS
January 15, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Time always allows the most complete story to be told when a historic event occurs. Days, weeks, months and years give us a chance to digest, investigate and take a step back from the initial emotions and accusations. The more information, the better the understanding of what took place and why. Few stories, if any, in the history of sports were as raw, shocking and long lasting as the events that took place at State College, Pa., in the autumn of 2011. Once the early November news broke that longtime Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky had been indicted on sex-abuse charges, things moved so fast it was impossible to keep up. Joe Paterno went from the pristine king of all college football coaches to a man forced to vacate his throne in just five days.
SPORTS
November 19, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Before Sonny Vaccaro spoke last week as the keynoter at Drexel's Sport for Social Change Conference, he was introduced as the person who signed Michael Jordan to his first deal with Nike. That must have been enough to gain the attention of all the Drexel students in the audience on Market Street. Here's the thing: When linking Jordan to Nike - facilitating what has to be the greatest marriage in the history of sports marketing - is maybe the third most impactful thing you've done with your life, you've had one interesting life.
SPORTS
September 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to help Atlantic City's ailing casino industry, the Christie administration issued a directive Monday declaring that New Jersey casinos and racetracks, effective today, may offer sports-betting pools to their patrons. Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman's directive says that, effective Monday, there is nothing in New Jersey law that "prevents casinos and racetracks from operating a sports pool. " "I'm happy," said Sen. Raymond Lesniak (D., Union), a major proponent of sports betting.
SPORTS
August 9, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Drexel athletic director Eric Zillmer had no doubt Thursday's vote by the NCAA Division I board of directors would grant approval for the "Power Five" conferences to gain the autonomy to chart their own course. He also has no doubt this is the wrong course for college sports. He hopes schools override the vote, as Drexel plans to do. Zillmer believes the Big Ten, Pac-12, Southeastern Conference, Atlantic Coast Conference, and Big 12 are grabbing fistfuls of more power by hiding behind what Zillmer calls "their version of enhancing student welfare.
SPORTS
August 8, 2014 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
TIM CHAMBERS was 10 years old when a women's college basketball team came to use his grade-school gym because it did not have a gym of its own. He only had to watch for a few minutes to realize "these girls are really, really good. " Fast forward nearly 4 decades and writer/director Tim Chambers told the story of Immaculata College basketball in "The Mighty Macs. " Tonight the story comes full circle when those Immaculata teams from 40 years ago are enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass.
SPORTS
June 25, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DID LEBRON JAMES' wife Savannah Brinson prematurely reveal that her superstar husband is planning to rejoin the Cavaliers? Maybe. Maybe not. On Sunday, Brinson posted an Instagram graphic showing a silhouette of the state of Ohio with a red star denoting the location of Akron. Accompanying the "photo" were the words, "Home sweet home!! The countdown is real! #330" Needless to say, it went viral. ESPN.com, citing a source, reported the post referred to the couple's plans to return to their home in Akron for the summer.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
The coaches at West Chester University are not looking to upgrade to Division I or to leave the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference. What they are doing as a group is supporting legislation that would take West Chester out of the state's higher education system. The real hope for the coaches is that West Chester gains autonomy in making decisions regarding athletics, and maybe that could result in more resources. Almost every Division II college, and the vast majority of those in Division I, could use more athletic revenues.
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