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College Tuition

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NEWS
January 19, 2008
Several leading universities have taken steps to reduce the exorbitant tuition rates for middle- and lower-income families. That's good news for the elite few who get in to the Harvards and Yales. But what about the rest of the schools? College tuitions keep climbing, but many students have no recourse but to take out more loans, often at steep interest rates. The likelihood of being in debt for a dozen years discourages many from going to college and is a big reason others do not finish.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Leo I. Higdon Jr. is president of Connecticut College College tuition is a bargain. I lobbed this sentence into a lively dinner-party conversation about the rising cost of college, and the response was a universal "Huh?" This from a roomful of highly educated, talented people who, one might think, would understand the value of higher education. I discovered it isn't the value people misunderstand; the actual cost of education is the mystery. The questions I answered that evening were questions people everywhere are wrestling with.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Mike Hudson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The cost of a college education is still climbing faster than inflation, but the rate of growth is slowing, statistics released yesterday by the College Board show. Board officials said the average tuition at a four-year college rose 4.6 percent this year. But experts say they doubt college costs will ever stop growing more rapidly than other prices. Thus, paying for higher education is likely to present an ever more daunting burden, particularly to lower- and middle-income Americans whose children don't qualify for big scholarships but who can't pay college bills without borrowing heavily.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at New Jersey's public colleges will pay higher tuition in the fall, but the increases in most cases will be smaller than in previous years. Tuition increases will average 9.3 percent at state colleges and universities, compared with 13.4 percent last year, according to the state Department of Higher Education. Community-college tuition will increase by an average of 10 percent, as opposed to 11.1 percent last year. Chancellor Edward D. Goldberg, who had asked the colleges to hold down tuition costs, yesterday said he was pleased that most had done so. And he stressed that things could have been worse.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By Marie George, Special to The Inquirer
The Glassboro State College Board of Trustees yesterday approved a tuition increase of $5 per credit hour, or an average of $150 per semester, effective at the beginning of the 1987-88 school year. This is the first year the trustees have been able to raise tuition without state approval. A state autonomy law that took effect this year empowers colleges to raise tuition; formerly, that power belonged solely to the state. Costs to attend the college, including room and board, will rise from about $4,885 to about $5,135.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
College tuition costs across the country will increase an average of 5 to 9 percent this fall, a marked slowdown in the double-digit increases of recent years, according to a national survey to be released today. However, a number of leading schools in the Philadelphia area report much higher tuition hikes for the 1989-90 school year. Tuition at Rutgers University, the state university of New Jersey, will rise 13 percent, nearly double the national average for public schools, while that at St. Joseph's University, a Jesuit school on City Avenue, will increase 16.2 percent, close to twice the average for private schools.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wracked by the recession, four-year public colleges have increased tuition and fees 12 percent this school year to an average of $2,137, the College Board reported in a survey released today. It was the first double-digit tuition increase at publicly funded colleges in eight years, the board said. At four-year private colleges, tuition and fees have risen 7 percent to an average of $10,017 for the current academic year, the board reported. Among two-year community colleges or junior colleges, tuition at publicly funded schools rose 13 percent to $1,022; tuition at privately funded schools increased 6 percent to $5,290.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Christine Armario, Associated Press
When those college tuition bills come in, be prepared for sticker shock - especially at Penn State. The average tuition at a four-year public university climbed 15 percent between 2008 and 2010, fueled by state budget cuts for higher education and increases of 40 percent and more at universities in states like Georgia, Arizona, and California. The U.S. Department of Education's annual look at college affordability also found significant price increases at the nation's private universities, including at for-profit institutions, where the net price for some schools is now twice as high as Harvard's.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2015
THERE'S LITTLE not to like in President Obama's idea to provide free tuition for community-college students, which he announced last week. The idea, which would require Congressional approval, would provide a free two-year tuition ride for students meeting certain criteria, including keeping a 2.5 grade-point average. Obama touted it as a plan that would help students finance the first half of a bachelor's degree. He intends to address the proposal further in his State of the Union address next week.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Caitlyn Ricci sued her parents for college tuition money, before they stopped talking, before her father accused his parents - Caitlyn's grandparents - of "tearing my family apart," the Ricci family was just trying to hold things together. Caitlyn Ricci's parents divorced in 1997, four years after her birth. Her mother has said she worked to create a caring environment - taking her to aquariums and art museums - when Caitlyn wasn't with her father. But as Caitlyn pushed age 18 and beyond, her parents said, their relationship with her grew fragile.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day that Olivia Robb's mother, Ellen Gregory Robb, was beaten to death in the family's Upper Merion home, police led the 12-year-old girl to where her father, Rafael, sat in a nearby ambulance. "He told me not to worry, that everything would be fine," Olivia Robb testified Tuesday, speaking to jurors in the Montgomery County Court wrongful-death suit against her father. "No matter what I was told. " Instead, she lost both her parents. Within weeks, her father was behind bars for the killing.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Two months before Rep. Chaka Fattah's bid for an 11th term in Congress, a longtime aide and friend admitted conspiring to misuse federal, charitable, and campaign funds to repay loans for Fattah's losing mayoral campaign and his son's college tuition. Accused in the plea of initiating the schemes, Fattah took days to defend himself and longer to produce more than a terse, generic denial. Even now, rather than address the details of the allegations, the Philadelphia Democrat prefers to draw attention to his achievements in Congress, the excesses of federal authorities, and the presumption of innocence.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Hirtle Callaghan & Co., a West Conshohocken investment shop with a long view of the markets, thinks there are way too few cheap asset classes out there. Jonathan Hirtle cofounded the firm in 1988 with Don Callaghan, now retired, and the company oversees $25 billion in assets with just over 100 employees. Currently, bonds everywhere are "quite risky," Hirtle said in an interview, particularly because central banks around the world have followed the Federal Reserve and aggressively cut interest rates.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Is your college student living at home this year? You can charge your kid rent, and be paid out of the 529 college-savings plan you set up years ago. Most important: The student must be enrolled at least half-time in school. According to accounting and tax experts, withdrawals from a 529 education fund can be used to cover housing expenses even if students continue living with their parents while attending college. Some experts, such as Rosalind Sutch of Drucker & Scaccetti Certified Public Accountants/Business Advisors in Center City, say it's crucial to be careful about how you account for those expenses out of a 529 plan.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delina Adams found out she'd been named an Affinity Scholar, she started screaming. Her mother ran down the stairs of their Northeast Philadelphia home. "She thought I was dying," Delina said. A few days after the phone call from her college adviser, Delina held an official letter from Mastery Charter Schools, dated April 2, confirming she was one of its 35 Affinity Scholars. The letter suggested to the family a great cloud had been lifted. "You will receive over $150,000 in financial aid (inclusive of scholarships and grants)
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's financially strapped state system of higher education will face a new test: A comprehensive review by the state's auditor general. In recent years, the 14-university Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) has seen declining enrollment and stagnant state funding, as well as a bid by one its members, West Chester, to consider withdrawing from the system. "College tuition and other costs are rising and we need to look at every possible option to keep from making college unaffordable to middle class families," Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Congratulations to high school graduates in May and June are being followed by family complaints about college tuition in August and September. No wonder state university bills are up: Pennsylvania and New Jersey are giving $2,200 less per student to their colleges than in 2008, according to inflation-adjusted data collected by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities from state records. And no wonder some of Pennsylvania State University's alumni trustees are grousing that, with less than $300 million of its $4.4 billion budget now appropriated from the state, Harrisburg shouldn't have so much to say about Happy Valley's agenda.
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