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College Tuition

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NEWS
January 19, 2008
Several leading universities have taken steps to reduce the exorbitant tuition rates for middle- and lower-income families. That's good news for the elite few who get in to the Harvards and Yales. But what about the rest of the schools? College tuitions keep climbing, but many students have no recourse but to take out more loans, often at steep interest rates. The likelihood of being in debt for a dozen years discourages many from going to college and is a big reason others do not finish.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Leo I. Higdon Jr. is president of Connecticut College College tuition is a bargain. I lobbed this sentence into a lively dinner-party conversation about the rising cost of college, and the response was a universal "Huh?" This from a roomful of highly educated, talented people who, one might think, would understand the value of higher education. I discovered it isn't the value people misunderstand; the actual cost of education is the mystery. The questions I answered that evening were questions people everywhere are wrestling with.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Mike Hudson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The cost of a college education is still climbing faster than inflation, but the rate of growth is slowing, statistics released yesterday by the College Board show. Board officials said the average tuition at a four-year college rose 4.6 percent this year. But experts say they doubt college costs will ever stop growing more rapidly than other prices. Thus, paying for higher education is likely to present an ever more daunting burden, particularly to lower- and middle-income Americans whose children don't qualify for big scholarships but who can't pay college bills without borrowing heavily.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at New Jersey's public colleges will pay higher tuition in the fall, but the increases in most cases will be smaller than in previous years. Tuition increases will average 9.3 percent at state colleges and universities, compared with 13.4 percent last year, according to the state Department of Higher Education. Community-college tuition will increase by an average of 10 percent, as opposed to 11.1 percent last year. Chancellor Edward D. Goldberg, who had asked the colleges to hold down tuition costs, yesterday said he was pleased that most had done so. And he stressed that things could have been worse.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By Marie George, Special to The Inquirer
The Glassboro State College Board of Trustees yesterday approved a tuition increase of $5 per credit hour, or an average of $150 per semester, effective at the beginning of the 1987-88 school year. This is the first year the trustees have been able to raise tuition without state approval. A state autonomy law that took effect this year empowers colleges to raise tuition; formerly, that power belonged solely to the state. Costs to attend the college, including room and board, will rise from about $4,885 to about $5,135.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
College tuition costs across the country will increase an average of 5 to 9 percent this fall, a marked slowdown in the double-digit increases of recent years, according to a national survey to be released today. However, a number of leading schools in the Philadelphia area report much higher tuition hikes for the 1989-90 school year. Tuition at Rutgers University, the state university of New Jersey, will rise 13 percent, nearly double the national average for public schools, while that at St. Joseph's University, a Jesuit school on City Avenue, will increase 16.2 percent, close to twice the average for private schools.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By L. Jay Lemons
Sen. Bernie Sanders' presidential bid has a big following on college campuses and among recent college graduates due in part to his proposal to eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities. His plan, which was introduced as legislation last May, rests on the appealingly simple idea that a public college education should be free. But like so many things that sound "too good to be true," free public college would come at a cost that is too high for Pennsylvania and its local economies, taxpayers, and students.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wracked by the recession, four-year public colleges have increased tuition and fees 12 percent this school year to an average of $2,137, the College Board reported in a survey released today. It was the first double-digit tuition increase at publicly funded colleges in eight years, the board said. At four-year private colleges, tuition and fees have risen 7 percent to an average of $10,017 for the current academic year, the board reported. Among two-year community colleges or junior colleges, tuition at publicly funded schools rose 13 percent to $1,022; tuition at privately funded schools increased 6 percent to $5,290.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Soon after suffering a devastating defeat, Temple University freshmen from Johnson Hall gathered in solidarity last week on Geasey Field. They'd just lost a fierce tug-of-war, pulled across the line during a round-robin competition that would end with Morgan South being crowned the strongest on campus. The Johnson freshmen swallowed their dismay and cheered for others. They talked, laughed, and danced to the loud music being blasted across the field. They made friends. "I'm definitely feeling a team vibe," said John Harris, 18, of Nazareth, Pa. "I wasn't feeling it so much before.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I'm nearly 22 and will begin my senior year of college this fall. I recently moved back in with my parents for the summer and was lucky enough to be offered a summer job that is related to my field and that would be a great resume-builder for me. The job is an hour and a half away from my parents' house, so I planned on moving in with my boyfriend of 21/2 years, who lives in that area. My parents do not approve. My parents have supported me 100 percent financially throughout the first three years of my college education, for which I am extremely grateful.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A former executive of a Philadelphia crime-victims support group has been charged with stealing more than $15,000 in grant money and spending it on groceries, restaurant meals, gas, hotel stays, and college tuition, authorities said Wednesday. Stephanie Mayweather, 52, the former executive director of East Division Crime Victim Services, was arrested Tuesday and charged with felony theft, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office said. After being arraigned Tuesday night before a Philadelphia magistrate, Mayweather, of Mullica Hill, was released on her own recognizance.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Power rests with informed voters Every potential voter for presidential candidates should read Daniel Pipes' commentary ("Trump's brand of politics? It's called neo-fascism," Friday). No matter how bullheaded and shortsighted Congress has seemingly become, we, the voters, still retain the power to fix our problems. Republican front-runner Donald Trump is thriving primarily on our collective disgust with Congress. We should remember that we voted into office every member of the Senate and House.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By L. Jay Lemons
Sen. Bernie Sanders' presidential bid has a big following on college campuses and among recent college graduates due in part to his proposal to eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities. His plan, which was introduced as legislation last May, rests on the appealingly simple idea that a public college education should be free. But like so many things that sound "too good to be true," free public college would come at a cost that is too high for Pennsylvania and its local economies, taxpayers, and students.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Older individuals are reinventing themselves by going back to the classroom. And in college-rich Philadelphia, they and their tuition dollars are welcome on campus. Some are like Howard Magen, a retired CPA who audits classes he loved during his original college days. Others are baby boomers facing retirement who want that longed-for degree before they run out of time, or to stay competitive in the workplace. Take Wanda Amaro, a human-resources executive who is earning her bachelor's degree at age 53. Many colleges offer low-fee or even free classes for seniors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My parents are refusing to pay for me to attend my dream school after learning that I am sexually active with my boyfriend of two years. (They liked him very much prior to learning this.) He's in school in France. They say it would be a "sin" to pay for me to attend school in the same city he's in, and they expect me to stay home and go to a local community college. Would it be wrong to disobey their wishes and take out my own student loans? - Parents vs. Boyfriend in France DEAR P VS. B: I not only think it would be wrong, I'm afraid it could be a disaster for you. What if the relationship doesn't work out?
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bill Cosby offered to pay college tuition for two women who alleged he drugged and sexually assaulted them, according to court filings unsealed this week. The scholarships were not intended to buy his accusers' silence, Cosby maintained in a 2005 deposition. But both offers were made immediately after the women confronted him about the alleged sexual encounters. His admission regarding the tuition payments could further complicate one of the 77-year-old actor-comedian's most visible philanthropic legacies - the millions of dollars he and his wife, Camille, have given to universities and individuals seeking college degrees.
NEWS
January 13, 2015
THERE'S LITTLE not to like in President Obama's idea to provide free tuition for community-college students, which he announced last week. The idea, which would require Congressional approval, would provide a free two-year tuition ride for students meeting certain criteria, including keeping a 2.5 grade-point average. Obama touted it as a plan that would help students finance the first half of a bachelor's degree. He intends to address the proposal further in his State of the Union address next week.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
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