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NEWS
July 20, 2013
By Katrina vanden Heuvel On July 1, federal student loan rates doubled from 3.4 percent to 6.8. Meanwhile, Oregon is paving the way for students to attend public universities without paying tuition or taking out traditional loans at all. A new bill, which Gov. John Kitzhaber is expected to sign, instructs Oregon's Higher Education Coordination Commission to come up with a "Pay It Forward, Pay It Back" university financing model in time for a...
NEWS
April 1, 2013
DEAR ABBY: There's this guy I like, "Joey. " My sister likes him, too. Joey and I are not dating, although we are very close friends. My sister (of course) decided to ask him out on a date. I'm so upset with her. It has been two days since their date and I'm still not talking to her. I can't believe she asked him out when she knew I was about to. I don't want to ruin our relationship, but Joey is now into her. Please give me some advice before I do something terribly wrong. - Can't take it in Florida DEAR CAN'T TAKE IT: If your sister jumped in knowing you were interested in Joey, it was sneaky and wrong.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County College will increase its per-credit costs by $5 next year, its first increase since the 2010-11 school year. School administrators said it was necessary to accommodate growth. The total cost per credit, $125.50, will still be the lowest in the state, said president David C. Hespe, a former state commissioner of education. The increase will help fund initiatives, Hespe said. "The first thing is increasing the number of full-time faculty members that we have on staff.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
It took the recession to do it, but it looks like America's colleges and universities are finally coming to their senses when it comes to the ever-increasing tuitions they have been charging students. A study by Moody's Investor Service says the demand for four-year college degrees is softening. Stagnant family incomes and poor job prospects in this economy are leading more young people to choose community college, if they choose college at all. Universities are responding to fewer student applications by freezing or reducing tuition and offering more scholarships.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
DEAR HARRY: I will be 70 1/2 next year. I have two traditional IRA accounts. One is in a credit union for $70,000, and the other is in a Morgan Stanley account for $67,000. I know I must start withdrawing from my IRAs, but I have some confusion. Do I have to take money from each account? If so, how do I determine how much from each? I have no special reason for having two IRAs; I just did it over a lot of years. And how about after I take the money out? Are there any special regulations as to what I am able to do with it?
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years after Lynn Yeakel challenged Arlen Specter for the U.S. Senate, the idea that 1992 was the "year of the woman" seems as quaint as it does sad. If Yeakel had won, she would have been the first female senator from Pennsylvania. No woman has come close since. No woman has ever been the state's governor. Only one woman serves in the state's congressional delegation. No woman has ever been elected mayor in the commonwealth's largest city. And among the 50 state legislatures, Pennsylvania ranks 43d in the proportion of women, only 17 percent.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Sallie Mae may be a low-interest kind of gal, but she's nothing if not persistent. And she wants her money every month. If you're the loan-poor parent of a college student, you know what I'm talking about. College tuition has skyrocketed since 1985 and become downright unaffordable for most American households, whether they belong to the 47 percent or not. For families in the lowest income group, college is the second-largest expense, pricing out plenty of would-be students - you know, the ones Mitt Romney claims don't take responsibility for their own lives.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
From the beginning, Mitt Romney scared me because of his troubling tendency to lie whenever it suited his political purposes. God forbid that a measly fact would get in the way of his privileged path to the presidency. But after having a few days to digest the Republican nominee's most recent reprehensible comments, caught on tape at a $50,000-a-plate fund-raiser, I've concluded that it's not Romney's lies that would make him such a terrible president. It's his truths. Ironically, even his truths are lies.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Steven Rea
A Hologram for the King By Dave Eggers McSweeney's Books. 317 pp. $25   Reviewed by Steven Rea     The nuclear family exploded long ago. The IOUs are stacked high. Foreclosure looks inevitable. He can't pay his daughter's college tuition — he's going to have to tell her she can't return for another semester — and every scheme to right the ship has turned wrong.   In Dave Eggers' deft and darkly comic A Hologram for the King, Alan Clay, a 54-year-old businessman, is staring into the abyss.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Christine Armario, Associated Press
When those college tuition bills come in, be prepared for sticker shock - especially at Penn State. The average tuition at a four-year public university climbed 15 percent between 2008 and 2010, fueled by state budget cuts for higher education and increases of 40 percent and more at universities in states like Georgia, Arizona, and California. The U.S. Department of Education's annual look at college affordability also found significant price increases at the nation's private universities, including at for-profit institutions, where the net price for some schools is now twice as high as Harvard's.
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