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Colon Cancer

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LIVING
December 15, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than four months ago, a group of Baltimore researchers announced a genetic mutation had been found that increased the risk of colon cancer for some Jewish people. The finding sent people seeking genetic testing. But now findings by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia suggest that the mutated gene by itself does not increase colon-cancer risk. The researchers conclude in today's issue of Cancer Research that widespread screening for the gene "is likely to be excessive.
NEWS
February 20, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the mixed results from the most ambitious, definitive study of postmenopausal women's health ever conducted, what's a woman to do? That's the question now that the federally funded Women's Health Initiative has wrapped up. It took 15 years, $725 million, 40 medical centers, and the steadfast participation of 161,000 American women ages 50 to 79. The WHI set out to test strategies touted as ways women could ward off cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's disease - "the major causes of death, disability and frailty in older women of all races.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
"YOU HAVE colon cancer. " These are words no one wants to hear, words that will surely change your life forever. Tony Pace was in his 40s when he heard them. The good-natured Philadelphia native, husband and father of three is an industrial mechanic and exercise enthusiast. He is also a four-year survivor of colon cancer, who describes his journey as a "strange tale that began with a 2007 diagnosis of an infected prostate. " Just weeks after treatment for the infection, he awoke one morning and urinated only blood.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug. Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the mutations.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
AS A PHYSICIAN who specializes in digestive health, I'm concerned that too few people are getting screened for colon cancer. Screening rates remain low, even though Medicare, Medicaid and many private plans pay for tests. Colon cancer is the No. 2 cancer killer in the U.S. It's estimated that over 8,000 new cases were diagnosed in Pennsylvania in 2007, with over 2,700 deaths. Despite these numbers, this is one of the most preventable cancers, curable if detected early. Early detection and intervention can reduce deaths by up to 90 percent.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Could colon cancer be a hormone deficiency disease? And could that deficiency also play a role in obesity? Thomas Jefferson University researcher Scott Waldman has been awarded a $1.2 million "provocative questions" grant from the National Cancer Institute to try to find answers. His search is focused on a hormone called guanylyl cyclase that binds to a cell "receptor," called GCC, in the intestines. The hormone activates GCC, which in turn tells intestinal cells to make more hormones.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 3,000 lives could be saved each year if a new form of chemotherapy for colon cancer patients is used, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute said yesterday. In two studies involving 1,704 cancer patients, including about 100 from the Philadelphia area, researchers found that death rates could be reduced 10 percent to 15 percent if two drugs were given after surgery. The National Cancer Institute sent out a special announcement to 36,000 physicians and cancer researchers urging them to adopt the new treatment, if possible.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
LIVING
March 22, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staffer Tom Moon
Tammy Faye Messner has colon cancer that required emergency surgery this week. A lawyer for her husband, Roe Messner - sentenced Wednesday to 27 months in jail for bankruptcy fraud - said: ". . . They hoped it had not spread. I think they found that it has. And she will be undergoing very aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy over the next six to eight weeks. " The development accounts for the absence of Messner, former wife of televangelist Jim Bakker, at the Wednesday sentencing.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most experts say colon cancer is a multistage disease driven by the accumulation of genetic mutations. Not Scott A. Waldman. The Thomas Jefferson University researcher has spent decades bolstering the iconoclastic idea that colon cancer is basically a hormone-deficiency disease - one that can be reversed or even prevented by restoring the hormone. Now, Waldman's team has also linked that hormone, called guanylin, to obesity, offering a clue to why obese people are at increased risk of colon cancer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016
John Buzbee, 50, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq after the 2003 U.S. invasion, died Thursday from complications from metastatic colon cancer. Mr. Buzbee served in Iraq during the effort to rebuild that nation after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. He started his career as a newspaper reporter in Los Angeles and Kansas City, covering police and city hall. But a longtime fascination with the Middle East prompted him to change careers in his early 30s. After earning a degree in Arab Studies and studying Arabic at Georgetown University, he joined the U.S. Foreign Service, working in American embassies and consulates throughout the Middle East and in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department in Washington over the next 16 turbulent years.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
James Uibel, 54, of Collingswood, a former real estate appraiser, died of colon cancer Monday, July 25, at Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Mount Holly. Born in Gloucester City, Mr. Uibel graduated from Gloucester City High School in 1980, earned a bachelor's degree in theater arts at Rutgers-Camden, and in the late 1990s studied finance at Temple University. From 2005 until illness forced him to retire in 2015, Mr. Uibel was a self-employed appraiser, working from a home office, said his spouse, Michael McKeown.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
Karen Frager and Lonnie Brown May 22, 2016, in Philadelphia Hello there Karen walked into her Uncle Keith's house one day in 1999 and found him at the kitchen table, playing cards. He introduced his opponent, Lonnie, to his niece. "We started talking, and I thought he was really mature for his age," Karen said. "She was very pretty," said Lonnie, "and had a really nice smile, which is what instantly caught my eye. " Karen and Lonnie became friends, mostly seeing each other when they hung out with Keith.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
For so long, when telling people why he has dedicated his career to the Broad Street Run, Jim Marino would tell his father's story. How it was his father's battle with colon cancer, a disease that would eventually take his life, that motivated him to first volunteer on race day 32 years ago - the event benefitted the American Cancer Society, and he saw it as his way to help. How he went on to become the race's director, transformed it into a nationally recognized running event, and still gets the most satisfaction out of the money and awareness the run raises for cancer research.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A daily dose of aspirin can help prevent both heart disease and colorectal cancer in adults age 50 to 69 who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, an independent panel of medical experts said Monday. The final recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that low-dose aspirin - typically, 81 mg - is most beneficial for people age 50 to 59. For adults 60 to 69, a decision should be made with their doctors because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, the panel said.
SPORTS
April 5, 2016
It was midsummer 2014, another lost season for the Phillies, but that was the least of anyone's concern in that little house in Sea Isle City. Jerry Gehman lay dying. He'd spent most of his 72 years saving lives on that beach in the summer and the rest of the year guiding lives at West Deptford High, a teacher and athletic director. In 1980, he stopped lifeguarding and went to work for the Phils, first as a security guard, later as a bartender, but not in 2014. Colon cancer had ravaged his body.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett, the first woman to hold that position, has died of colon cancer after less than a year on the job, the university said Monday. She was 52. Garrett, who became president of the Ivy League school on July 1, died Sunday night at her home, Cornell said. "While Beth's tenure as president has tragically been cut short, her efforts over the last eight months have set the university on a path toward continued excellence," said Robert Harrison, chairman of the Cornell board of trustees.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most experts say colon cancer is a multistage disease driven by the accumulation of genetic mutations. Not Scott A. Waldman. The Thomas Jefferson University researcher has spent decades bolstering the iconoclastic idea that colon cancer is basically a hormone-deficiency disease - one that can be reversed or even prevented by restoring the hormone. Now, Waldman's team has also linked that hormone, called guanylin, to obesity, offering a clue to why obese people are at increased risk of colon cancer.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Levins, 67, of Philadelphia, a city police officer for 28 years, died Wednesday, April 1, at Fox Chase Cancer Center from complications of colon cancer. The fifth of eight children born to Francis and Charlotte Levins, Mr. Levins was well-known as one of four brothers who followed their father into working for the Police Department. A year after graduating from Cardinal Dougherty High School in 1966, Mr. Levins enlisted in the Army, for which he served until 1968 as a member of the 82d Airborne Division and the 173d Airborne Brigade in Vietnam.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Roman Catholic and Massachusetts basketball standout Lari Ketner, 37, died Friday morning after a year-long battle with colon cancer. After starring for Roman (Class of 1995), the 6-foot-10 Ketner went on to play for UMass for three seasons. Drafted by the Chicago Bulls with the 49th pick of the 1999 NBA draft, he ended up playing for the Bulls (1999-2000), Cleveland Cavaliers (1999-2000), and Indiana Pacers (2000-01). Ketner, who helped the Cahillites to a 27-3 record and their sixth straight Catholic League championship in 1994, played with a few minor-league teams after his brief NBA career.
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