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Colon Cancer

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LIVING
December 15, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than four months ago, a group of Baltimore researchers announced a genetic mutation had been found that increased the risk of colon cancer for some Jewish people. The finding sent people seeking genetic testing. But now findings by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia suggest that the mutated gene by itself does not increase colon-cancer risk. The researchers conclude in today's issue of Cancer Research that widespread screening for the gene "is likely to be excessive.
NEWS
February 20, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the mixed results from the most ambitious, definitive study of postmenopausal women's health ever conducted, what's a woman to do? That's the question now that the federally funded Women's Health Initiative has wrapped up. It took 15 years, $725 million, 40 medical centers, and the steadfast participation of 161,000 American women ages 50 to 79. The WHI set out to test strategies touted as ways women could ward off cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's disease - "the major causes of death, disability and frailty in older women of all races.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
"YOU HAVE colon cancer. " These are words no one wants to hear, words that will surely change your life forever. Tony Pace was in his 40s when he heard them. The good-natured Philadelphia native, husband and father of three is an industrial mechanic and exercise enthusiast. He is also a four-year survivor of colon cancer, who describes his journey as a "strange tale that began with a 2007 diagnosis of an infected prostate. " Just weeks after treatment for the infection, he awoke one morning and urinated only blood.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug. Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the mutations.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
AS A PHYSICIAN who specializes in digestive health, I'm concerned that too few people are getting screened for colon cancer. Screening rates remain low, even though Medicare, Medicaid and many private plans pay for tests. Colon cancer is the No. 2 cancer killer in the U.S. It's estimated that over 8,000 new cases were diagnosed in Pennsylvania in 2007, with over 2,700 deaths. Despite these numbers, this is one of the most preventable cancers, curable if detected early. Early detection and intervention can reduce deaths by up to 90 percent.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Could colon cancer be a hormone deficiency disease? And could that deficiency also play a role in obesity? Thomas Jefferson University researcher Scott Waldman has been awarded a $1.2 million "provocative questions" grant from the National Cancer Institute to try to find answers. His search is focused on a hormone called guanylyl cyclase that binds to a cell "receptor," called GCC, in the intestines. The hormone activates GCC, which in turn tells intestinal cells to make more hormones.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 3,000 lives could be saved each year if a new form of chemotherapy for colon cancer patients is used, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute said yesterday. In two studies involving 1,704 cancer patients, including about 100 from the Philadelphia area, researchers found that death rates could be reduced 10 percent to 15 percent if two drugs were given after surgery. The National Cancer Institute sent out a special announcement to 36,000 physicians and cancer researchers urging them to adopt the new treatment, if possible.
LIVING
March 22, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staffer Tom Moon
Tammy Faye Messner has colon cancer that required emergency surgery this week. A lawyer for her husband, Roe Messner - sentenced Wednesday to 27 months in jail for bankruptcy fraud - said: ". . . They hoped it had not spread. I think they found that it has. And she will be undergoing very aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy over the next six to eight weeks. " The development accounts for the absence of Messner, former wife of televangelist Jim Bakker, at the Wednesday sentencing.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what researchers say is a major advance in cancer treatment, a new drug regimen has been found to cut the death rate of a common form of colon cancer by one-third, scientists at 10 medical centers will report today. The findings mean that 8,000 to 10,000 lives could be saved each year if patients take a combination of the two drugs after surgery, said John S. Macdonald, director of Temple University's Cancer Center and one of 12 authors of the study published in today's issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Levins, 67, of Philadelphia, a city police officer for 28 years, died Wednesday, April 1, at Fox Chase Cancer Center from complications of colon cancer. The fifth of eight children born to Francis and Charlotte Levins, Mr. Levins was well-known as one of four brothers who followed their father into working for the Police Department. A year after graduating from Cardinal Dougherty High School in 1966, Mr. Levins enlisted in the Army, for which he served until 1968 as a member of the 82d Airborne Division and the 173d Airborne Brigade in Vietnam.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Roman Catholic and Massachusetts basketball standout Lari Ketner, 37, died Friday morning after a year-long battle with colon cancer. After starring for Roman (Class of 1995), the 6-foot-10 Ketner went on to play for UMass for three seasons. Drafted by the Chicago Bulls with the 49th pick of the 1999 NBA draft, he ended up playing for the Bulls (1999-2000), Cleveland Cavaliers (1999-2000), and Indiana Pacers (2000-01). Ketner, who helped the Cahillites to a 27-3 record and their sixth straight Catholic League championship in 1994, played with a few minor-league teams after his brief NBA career.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to colonoscopies, most patients agree comfort during the procedure is key. But how much comfort? And at what cost? With more patients receiving anesthesia during colonoscopies - rather than light or moderate conscious sedation - the expense of using the drug propofol by a credentialed anesthetist or anesthesiologist has come into question. In the spring, Highmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the dominant insurer in western Pennsylvania, announced it would no longer pay benefits for monitored anesthesia for average-risk patients receiving endoscopic procedures.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A judge has denied a defense motion in a petty drug case to suppress evidence from a Philadelphia narcotics officer who admitted that he gave false testimony in a previous case to protect the safety of a confidential informant. After hearing brief arguments from two defense lawyers, Municipal Judge T. Francis Shields ruled that he would allow Christopher Hulmes' testimony in the trial of Ricardo Jennings, 55, whom Shields later found guilty on drug-possession charges. Jennings, who used the alias Richard Hill earlier in the trial, was arrested June 14 after police seized six packets of heroin from his car on Lehigh Avenue near A Street.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DAVID J. BALDWIN was a fighter. No way was he going to let a cancer diagnosis crimp his lifestyle or stifle his spirit. He had things to do. There was his daughter's wedding to attend, where he fully intended to give away the bride and dance with her at the reception. And there were Flyers games to watch, and kids to coach and inspire. And fellow cancer patients to counsel and take care of. And, of course, his job as director of local advertising for the Inquirer, which he had graced with his talents and work ethic for 33 years.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Diamond, For The Inquirer
'I'm pretty lucky," Tony Pace explained, which is not the reaction most people might have when hearing his story. In 2008, Pace battled colon cancer that had spread to his liver and bladder. Surgeons removed half of each organ, and had to rebuild the ureter line on the right side of his kidney. Six months of chemotherapy followed. In 2009 came a liver resection along with removal of his gallbladder. The Clifton Heights man, 53, has been cancer-free ever since. Pace's oncologist calls him an outlier, someone whose reaction to care is so remarkable that it's unexplainable - up until now, anyway.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THERESA OTERI was in Florida with her aunt, Nancy Desiderio, on Aug. 23, 2011, when a 5.8-magnitude earthquake in Virginia sent tremors up and down the East Coast. The two weren't among the millions of people who felt a hint of the unexpected quake. "But believe me," Oteri said, "our world shook. " Desiderio, an active, outgoing woman who at 60 looked a good decade younger, was diagnosed that day with stage 4 lung cancer. The grim diagnosis was completely unexpected. Desiderio had been in seemingly terrific shape.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | Art Carey, For The Inquirer
In late June, Muffy McCabe won the women's golf tournament at the Philadelphia Country Club. There was a certain inevitability about it, truthfully, and it shouldn't come as a big surprise. Her relatives have been members of the club for three generations. McCabe began playing golf when she was 6. When she was at Shipley School, she played in the third position on the boys' varsity (there was no girls' team). As an adult, in her mid-30s, she played golf every day and excelled in interclub contests.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Keane Smith, 46, a Springfield, Delaware County, native and mother who chronicled online her six-year battle with breast cancer, died Tuesday, May 28, of the disease at her home in Atlanta. "As sad as this was, Karen had been fighting this recurrence of cancer since 2/13/12," posted husband Kirk Smith immediately after her death, "and the past two weeks had been nothing but surviving. "Karen is in a better place, and I'm happy she's now free from her pain and suffering.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise Benn spent Mother's Day last year enduring the effects of chemotherapy, trying to treat the cancer that invaded her colon and worried her five sons. One of those sons is Arrelious Benn, now an Eagles wide receiver and in better spirits than a year ago. One of the reasons is the health of Denise, whose cancer is in remission. On Saturday, one day before Mother's Day, Denise joined her five sons on Team Arrelious, created for the Susan G. Komen Global Race for the Cure, a 5K walk/run in his native Washington.
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