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Colon Cancer

NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one likes having a colonoscopy - a big reason why the colon cancer screening is underused. Nonetheless, growing research suggests that older folks are having unnecessary colonoscopies. The latest study of routine colonoscopies among people over 70 found that nearly a quarter were getting "potentially inappropriate" tests, based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. Those guidelines say that people at average risk of colon cancer should have a colonoscopy once a decade starting at age 50, and stop at age 75. The rationale is that the disease usually progresses slowly, so people near the end of their lives are unlikely to live longer with early detection and treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
"YOU HAVE colon cancer. " These are words no one wants to hear, words that will surely change your life forever. Tony Pace was in his 40s when he heard them. The good-natured Philadelphia native, husband and father of three is an industrial mechanic and exercise enthusiast. He is also a four-year survivor of colon cancer, who describes his journey as a "strange tale that began with a 2007 diagnosis of an infected prostate. " Just weeks after treatment for the infection, he awoke one morning and urinated only blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking, having trouble pushing a chair across the room. That's according to a "mortality index" developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. The test scores may satisfy people's morbid curiosity, but the researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors. It can help them decide whether costly health screenings or medical procedures are worth the risk for patients unlikely to live 10 more years.
NEWS
December 30, 2012
Terry Glover, 57, the managing editor of Ebony magazine, has died of colon cancer at her Chicago home. Ebony announced on its website that Mrs. Glover died Monday. Her husband, Kendall Glover, told the Chicago Tribune that his wife had been fighting cancer for about two years. Mrs. Glover joined Ebony in 2006 and was appointed managing editor in 2009 after serving as a senior editor for the website for three years. Editor-in-chief Amy DuBois Barnett said Mrs. Glover was "the heart and soul" of the magazine's team.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
John F. Rosen, 77, a pediatrician whose discovery of high levels of lead poisoning among the New York City children he treated propelled him to campaign for a national effort to prevent the condition, died of colon cancer Dec. 7 in Greenwich, Conn. Concerned about the levels of lead in his young patients and knowing that lead poisoning diminished mental capacities irreversibly, Dr. Rosen helped establish one of the nation's first and largest clinics to lead poisoning. He went on to push New York City to adopt stricter standards for removing lead paint from tens of thousands of old buildings.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012
Lindsey Vonn remains hospitalized in Colorado with "severe intestinal pain" that has been affecting her for the last two weeks. Vonn's spokesman, Lewis Kay , told the Associated Press that "Lindsey remains in the hospital awaiting results from diagnostic testing for severe intestinal pain. " The four-time overall World Cup champion's ski technician Heinz Haemmerle said Vonn hasn't trained since going out in the second run of the season-opening giant slalom Oct. 27 in Soelden, Austria.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sharon Osbourne , who successfully battled colon cancer a decade ago, has revealed that she recently had a double mastectomy even though her breasts were cancer-free. The 60-year-old heavy-metal spouse and talk-show host tells Britain's Hello! that she was impelled to make that radical move last summer after learning that she has a gene that predisposes women to breast cancer. "As soon as I found out I had the breast cancer gene, I thought: 'The odds are not in my favor,' " Osbourne said.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Could colon cancer be a hormone deficiency disease? And could that deficiency also play a role in obesity? Thomas Jefferson University researcher Scott Waldman has been awarded a $1.2 million "provocative questions" grant from the National Cancer Institute to try to find answers. His search is focused on a hormone called guanylyl cyclase that binds to a cell "receptor," called GCC, in the intestines. The hormone activates GCC, which in turn tells intestinal cells to make more hormones.
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