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Colonial History

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NEWS
April 29, 1987 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
A contingent of Revolutionary War soldiers led by George Washington will parade down Main Street in Medford on Friday as the annual "Historic Medford Village" spring festival is renewed for the fifth year this weekend. Dressed in colonial military attire and armed with muskets and gunpowder, about a dozen actors from the Laurie Company of Revolutionary Soldiers, based in Burlington, will portray the Second New Jersey Regiment Friday evening, and Saturday May 2 from 10 a.m to 5 p.m, according to festival coordinator Connie Brown.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Evening in the Colonial Kitchen is going strong this winter at the Cock 'n Bull restaurant at Peddler's Village in Lahaska. This annual series of dinner programs features a meal and a visit by two historical characters from 5 to 9 p.m. every Monday from November through March. This Monday, George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette, who served with him, will appear. Each program includes a meal ($15.95, $8.95 for children 10 and under), conversation with the characters, demonstrations of colonial cooking on an open hearth, and food tastings.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Harris and Rick Young are well equipped when they travel. They pack a screwdriver, fishing tackle, a few turkey calls, an ax, birdshot, a priming horn, ammunition, a smooth bore muzzle loader, a pepper grinder, a salt stick, venison jerky, a hunting knife, one hard tea brick, cups made from gourds and cow horns, some dried corn, a fork with two prongs, a sewing kit, a compass, some deer hides, flint, a magnifying glass, a sack of coffee, a...
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's hard for historians to get a handle on John Morton, Delaware County's only signer of the Declaration of Independence. To start with, there isn't even a portrait known to have been made before his death. The house once said to be his apparently wasn't. There are scant details about his birth and early life. Even his tie-breaking vote in the Pennsylvania delegation on July 4, 1776 - a vote that may well have changed the course of American history - is in dispute. His death from consumption nine months later - he was the first of the signers to die - left almost everything else about him, even the place of his death, to conjecture.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Nicholas A. Panagoplos of Upper Darby has been selected by the National Reference Institute of Washington for inclusion in the 1990 issue of Who's Who in American Education. Panagoplos is employed by the School District of Philadelphia, where he has served as a teacher, supervisor, vice principal and executive assistant in the office of curriculum. George W. Franz, an assistant professor of history at the Delaware County Campus of Pennsylvania State University in Middletown, has been awarded the university's George W. Atherton Award for excellence in teaching.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Walter E. Williams
Why are we a rich nation? It's tempting to suggest our wealth is a result of bountiful natural resources. However, if bountiful resources were the source of wealth, South America and Africa would be rich instead of being mired in poverty. Japan and England, natural resources-poor nations, would be poor instead of rich. Development experts and foreign-aid hustlers would have us believe that past colonialism accounts for Third World poverty. That explanation ignores the fact that United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong have a colonial history and are rich, while Nepal, Tibet, Liberia and Ethiopia weren't colonies and are among the world's poorest nations.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
There's something irresistibly fascinating about the contrast created when a flower blooms atop a pile of rubble. That may be why a proposal to build a park along three miles of abandoned railroad beds, alternately running over and under the ground, is so intriguing. The beautiful-ugly of Philadelphia's industrial past has sent imaginations soaring around the train tracks, which run roughly from Girard Avenue east of Kelly Drive to about Ninth Street and Fairmount Avenue. Paul vanMeter and a group of like-minded urban re-imaginers have organized themselves under the banner Viaductgreene.org, and are building support for the new park, which would showcase the city's former life as a vital manufacturing hub. People will be able to walk or cycle along the old train beds and into the underground tunnels, where they may find vendors or historical exhibits.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
larissa Dillon used to mortify her teenage son by wearing her work clothes - a colonial-style getup - while driving him somewhere. "He'd say, 'Oh for God's sake, Mom, you look like a baby in that bonnet!' " she recalls. But Dillon was - and, at 79, remains - unmoved. That's because for this ardent devotee of 18th-century "domestic arts" in Southeastern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary life at that time, in this place, is worth exploring. If that means "wearing funny clothes" and sporting what looks remarkably like a baby bonnet at the wheel of her car, too bad. And by the way, it's not a bonnet.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Revolutionary War patriots who forged iron cannonballs in this historic Pinelands village more than 200 years ago will not be forgotten. Nor will history ignore the Victorian side of the town that Philadelphia industrialist Joseph Wharton once used as a summer escape. Under a plan released by the state last week, both aspects of Batsto Village's heritage will be preserved, ending a three-year battle between state officials and the Batsto Citizens Committee, a historic-preservation group.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Cherry Hill developer is once again approaching the borough in an attempt to build a CVS drugstore on the site of the 18th-century home of Frederick Muhlenberg, the first speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the first signer of the Bill of Rights. Site Development Inc., which first proposed the 10,000-square-foot store last year, is scheduled to appear before the local Planning Commission June 20, Borough Manager Alan Cartacki said. Neither officials at Site Development nor the company's attorney, Douglas Breidenbach, returned phone calls yesterday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
larissa Dillon used to mortify her teenage son by wearing her work clothes - a colonial-style getup - while driving him somewhere. "He'd say, 'Oh for God's sake, Mom, you look like a baby in that bonnet!' " she recalls. But Dillon was - and, at 79, remains - unmoved. That's because for this ardent devotee of 18th-century "domestic arts" in Southeastern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary life at that time, in this place, is worth exploring. If that means "wearing funny clothes" and sporting what looks remarkably like a baby bonnet at the wheel of her car, too bad. And by the way, it's not a bonnet.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
There's something irresistibly fascinating about the contrast created when a flower blooms atop a pile of rubble. That may be why a proposal to build a park along three miles of abandoned railroad beds, alternately running over and under the ground, is so intriguing. The beautiful-ugly of Philadelphia's industrial past has sent imaginations soaring around the train tracks, which run roughly from Girard Avenue east of Kelly Drive to about Ninth Street and Fairmount Avenue. Paul vanMeter and a group of like-minded urban re-imaginers have organized themselves under the banner Viaductgreene.org, and are building support for the new park, which would showcase the city's former life as a vital manufacturing hub. People will be able to walk or cycle along the old train beds and into the underground tunnels, where they may find vendors or historical exhibits.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010
By Marla R. Miller Henry Holt. 467 pp $30 Reviewed by Siobhan Conaty Forget the flag, Betsy Ross was a fascinating figure in U.S. history in her own right. Betsy Griscom Ross Ashburn Claypoole (she was a Ross ever so briefly in her long life) was a working mother whose successful career supported both her immediate and extended families. She challenged the tenets of her Quaker faith, supported a revolution, lived in an occupied city, survived the loss of two husbands (both of whom had been captured at sea and spent time in a British prison)
NEWS
July 24, 2008 | By Noel Dolan FOR THE INQUIRER
The Patriots Path, a walking trail that would connect three Chester County Revolutionary War sites, is one step closer to actualization. On July 15, the three affected townships, Tredyffrin, Malvern, and East Whiteland, began the approval process to hire a consultant to undertake a multi-municipal trail study for the Eastern Great Valley. The Patriots Path, if completed, would link Valley Forge National Historic Park with the Paoli Memorial Grounds and Paoli Massacre site in Malvern and end at the site of Battle of the Clouds Park in East Whiteland Township.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia in August, Philip Jacobson will portray bank robber Willie Sutton. But at Valley Forge National Historical Park on other days this summer, he will be, among others, Martha Washington. In 21st-century shirt and trousers. No cross-dressing, please. Down the lawn about 50 yards from George Washington's headquarters, Jacobson is a modern storyteller, dipping into 18th-century moments. Channeling a colonial infantryman, a German general and, yes, Martha.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Evening in the Colonial Kitchen is going strong this winter at the Cock 'n Bull restaurant at Peddler's Village in Lahaska. This annual series of dinner programs features a meal and a visit by two historical characters from 5 to 9 p.m. every Monday from November through March. This Monday, George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette, who served with him, will appear. Each program includes a meal ($15.95, $8.95 for children 10 and under), conversation with the characters, demonstrations of colonial cooking on an open hearth, and food tastings.
REAL_ESTATE
June 18, 2000 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Standing just beyond the bridge over one of the two streams running through Upper Stream Farm, one can see, if not forever, at least 200 years. The 4.8-acre property sits back off Swedesford Road in Tredyffrin Township behind a small bridge and waterfall. There, a 19th-century cottage, the original barn (circa 1770) with walls of hand-stacked stones held together by horsehair, and two modern garages surround the original main house and its contemporary additions. "Walking in the back, between the house and the barn, you go back more than 200 years," owner Matthew Emmens, 48, said.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Cherry Hill developer is once again approaching the borough in an attempt to build a CVS drugstore on the site of the 18th-century home of Frederick Muhlenberg, the first speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the first signer of the Bill of Rights. Site Development Inc., which first proposed the 10,000-square-foot store last year, is scheduled to appear before the local Planning Commission June 20, Borough Manager Alan Cartacki said. Neither officials at Site Development nor the company's attorney, Douglas Breidenbach, returned phone calls yesterday.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Balancing a heavy wooden tabletop while trying to attach the first of its four legs is not easy. That's what Leslie Archard, 10, learned yesterday as the Media-Providence Friends School fifth grader tried to re-enact the day's work of a colonial cabinetmaker. With each bang of her hammer, Leslie gained a new appreciation of American life more than 200 years ago. "I tried turning it [the table top] over, but then I didn't know how to get the nails between the leg and the table.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Walter E. Williams
Why are we a rich nation? It's tempting to suggest our wealth is a result of bountiful natural resources. However, if bountiful resources were the source of wealth, South America and Africa would be rich instead of being mired in poverty. Japan and England, natural resources-poor nations, would be poor instead of rich. Development experts and foreign-aid hustlers would have us believe that past colonialism accounts for Third World poverty. That explanation ignores the fact that United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong have a colonial history and are rich, while Nepal, Tibet, Liberia and Ethiopia weren't colonies and are among the world's poorest nations.
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