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Colonial House

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NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer William Levitt created what he thought was "utopia" for the veterans of World War II as he used his wealth to buy farmland in Bucks County and turn it into affordable suburban living with simple homes, schools, and parks. "It was wonderful," said Army veteran Albert Wargo, who in 1956 bought his slice of the American Dream with his wife, June, both 88. Now married 65 years and living in North Wales near their three children, the two returned Sunday to Levittown to participate in the community's 60th anniversary and offer an oral history.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Progress, that's what they called it. A building boom was underway in Cape May back in 1882, and the old house had to go. Besides, it was a plain little thing, nothing grand like the big homes taking shape down by the water and along the streets leading there, all of them festooned with gingerbread trim and mountain-peak roofs and porches that seemed to reach for blocks. But the folks on Washington Street decided not to flatten that little place. Instead, they cut down big trees and teamed up horses, fitting them with harnesses and ropes and chains.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cigarettes smoldering in a trash bin are blamed for igniting a fire that destroyed an upscale home near the Bucks County Country Club on Sunday afternoon. "The homeowner failed to put out his cigarette ashes before he deposited them in the trash located in the garage," said Warwick Fire Marshal Ed Pfeiffer. Neighbors of Lee Jones, of the 2300 block of Peony Court in the Jamison Hunt development, noticed smoke shortly after 1 p.m. and thought Jones was burning leaves in his backyard, Pfeiffer said.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | By Peter Smolowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Developers will start spending more to market a historic home here, under a compromise reached last night that most likely will also allow them to demolish one of the house's newer portions. Rouse/Chamberlin Homes officials have resisted spending too much money to sell the house, built about 1750, because they do not want costs associated with the home to reduce their profits indefinitely. Now, they will start paying for costs such as newspaper real estate advertisements. In return, developers can tell potential buyers that Historic Commission members would probably recommend approving plans to level a newer part of the large stone house.
NEWS
November 2, 1986 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
Residents of Green Lane in Primos call it "Millionaires Lane," although no one is quite sure why. They have made one thing clear to the Upper Darby Zoning Hearing Board, however: They do not want to see a new house go up on their block. Nearly a dozen residents of the street appeared before the board Thursday night to oppose the granting of variances that would clear the way for the construction of a two-story Colonial house on one of the last undeveloped plots of land on the street.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wayne Cherrington is afraid that a series of small explosions near his yard will crumble the fragile foundation of his colonial house on Bustleton Pike. The developer has told the township it may be necessary to blast through stone to put in water and sewer lines for a proposed 77-house development on 82 acres near Springfield Lake. Cherrington said he and his neighbors would take their concerns about blasting and other construction problems to the supervisors this week when they review the proposal from Toll Brothers.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Jeff Davidson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the green architecture movement taking the housing industry by storm, there's nothing more eco-friendly than buying and restoring an old house or even updating the one you have. Ingrid Abramovitch's new book, Restoring a House in the City: A Guide to Renovating Town Houses, Brownstones, and Row Houses (Artisan Books, $40), offers an outline for work at any stage of the renovating process with the goal of satisfaction with the final product. Philadelphia is a prime location for applying the ideas in her book, the author said.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Reilly has endured so many tragedies in the last four years that his brother says they should rename the Book of Job "the Book of Jim. " In August 2006, Reilly's 21-year-old son, Andrew, a college senior who was studying to become a special-education teacher, was killed in a car accident on his way to Millersville University to begin the school year. Two years later, his wife, April, a nurse, was diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer and died in October 2008, leaving him to care for another son who is severely disabled.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Wilsa and Raymond Charles moved into their new home in March, they knew that the Colonial house was built more than 60 years ago. They knew that it had a few leaky ceilings. And they knew that they had just invested all of their hard-earned savings. The Charleses did not know that beneath their $100,000 home in the 800 block of West Cobbs Creek Parkway, the infrastructure was old and crumbling. Three weeks after they moved in, a basement toilet backed up during a heavy rainstorm, flooding the recreation room.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | By Stacia Friedman
Halloween is one of our better American holidays. You don't have to get together with relatives you hate. You don't have to buy expensive gifts or send cards. And if you're not in the holiday mood, you can just turn off your porch light and keep all your Milky Ways for yourself. Not everyone agrees. This year, a West Philadelphia private school banned all Halloween festivities. No costumes, no decorations, no parties. The mother of a seventh grader confided, "The kids were disappointed so we're having a Halloween party for them at our house.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer William Levitt created what he thought was "utopia" for the veterans of World War II as he used his wealth to buy farmland in Bucks County and turn it into affordable suburban living with simple homes, schools, and parks. "It was wonderful," said Army veteran Albert Wargo, who in 1956 bought his slice of the American Dream with his wife, June, both 88. Now married 65 years and living in North Wales near their three children, the two returned Sunday to Levittown to participate in the community's 60th anniversary and offer an oral history.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Reilly has endured so many tragedies in the last four years that his brother says they should rename the Book of Job "the Book of Jim. " In August 2006, Reilly's 21-year-old son, Andrew, a college senior who was studying to become a special-education teacher, was killed in a car accident on his way to Millersville University to begin the school year. Two years later, his wife, April, a nurse, was diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer and died in October 2008, leaving him to care for another son who is severely disabled.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Jeff Davidson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the green architecture movement taking the housing industry by storm, there's nothing more eco-friendly than buying and restoring an old house or even updating the one you have. Ingrid Abramovitch's new book, Restoring a House in the City: A Guide to Renovating Town Houses, Brownstones, and Row Houses (Artisan Books, $40), offers an outline for work at any stage of the renovating process with the goal of satisfaction with the final product. Philadelphia is a prime location for applying the ideas in her book, the author said.
NEWS
December 3, 2006 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Take a horse-drawn carriage ride in Media Borough, enjoy a Victorian tea in an elegant 200-year-old mansion in Upland, or check out a model train display in a carriage house at the historic Grange Estate in Haverford. Those are just a few of the new twists added to the historic house tours offered this holiday season in Delaware County. Media. Saturday in Media Borough, visitors can tour 13 houses and buildings that date from the 1700s to 1952 and represent a variety of architectural styles, such as Queen Anne Victorian and late Gothic Revival.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Wilsa and Raymond Charles moved into their new home in March, they knew that the Colonial house was built more than 60 years ago. They knew that it had a few leaky ceilings. And they knew that they had just invested all of their hard-earned savings. The Charleses did not know that beneath their $100,000 home in the 800 block of West Cobbs Creek Parkway, the infrastructure was old and crumbling. Three weeks after they moved in, a basement toilet backed up during a heavy rainstorm, flooding the recreation room.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cigarettes smoldering in a trash bin are blamed for igniting a fire that destroyed an upscale home near the Bucks County Country Club on Sunday afternoon. "The homeowner failed to put out his cigarette ashes before he deposited them in the trash located in the garage," said Warwick Fire Marshal Ed Pfeiffer. Neighbors of Lee Jones, of the 2300 block of Peony Court in the Jamison Hunt development, noticed smoke shortly after 1 p.m. and thought Jones was burning leaves in his backyard, Pfeiffer said.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | By Peter Smolowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Developers will start spending more to market a historic home here, under a compromise reached last night that most likely will also allow them to demolish one of the house's newer portions. Rouse/Chamberlin Homes officials have resisted spending too much money to sell the house, built about 1750, because they do not want costs associated with the home to reduce their profits indefinitely. Now, they will start paying for costs such as newspaper real estate advertisements. In return, developers can tell potential buyers that Historic Commission members would probably recommend approving plans to level a newer part of the large stone house.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wayne Cherrington is afraid that a series of small explosions near his yard will crumble the fragile foundation of his colonial house on Bustleton Pike. The developer has told the township it may be necessary to blast through stone to put in water and sewer lines for a proposed 77-house development on 82 acres near Springfield Lake. Cherrington said he and his neighbors would take their concerns about blasting and other construction problems to the supervisors this week when they review the proposal from Toll Brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1995 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Although it's only Dec. 1, some revelers have already pulled boxes of old ornaments out of the attic, strung lights through naked dogwood trees, polished silver, wrapped presents (which may be just empty boxes), spruced up teddy-bear collections, and baked cookies. Those impressive, ahead-of-the-game celebrators are the people who will be opening their homes to the public beginning this weekend, when the holiday house-tour season begins. You can tour a vast array of decorated houses over the next few weeks, ranging from the very personal small-town peek into people's private lives to the elaborate efforts of garden clubs and historical societies to public mansions and museum homes that have been decorated for the holidays.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sylvia's Restaurant is as much a part of Harlem as James Baldwin or the Apollo Theater. For three decades, soul-food lovers from all over the world have trekked to Lenox Avenue for such down-home dishes as Sylvia's World Famous, Talked About, Bar-B-Que Ribs Special, with her sweet and spicy sauce. It has become a regular stop for Manhattan tour buses. Political candidates cannot say they've campaigned in Harlem without making at least one stop in Sylvia's boisterous, aroma-filled dining room.
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