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Colonial Theatre

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NEWS
December 14, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 6:15 last night, the Colonial Theatre's neon marquee buzzed and flickered to life for the first time in decades. The gold, red and blue light reflected in curbside puddles and brightened Bridge Street's brick rowhouses and shops - and the town's hopes for renewal. Police had stopped traffic on the downtown street, and a crowd of locals laughed and clapped; some stayed long after to gaze into the neon, the first time the Colonial Theatre had been lit like this since their childhoods.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Phoenixville's old Colonial Theatre went up for sale in 1996, some residents were worried about the possible consequences - but six of them also saw it as a chance to bring new life to their struggling Chester County community. "We believed that a movie theater that was vibrant and alive, and had a lot of different programs, could help revitalize the entire business district," said Mary Foote, one of those six and now the Colonial's executive director. Since buying the 645-seat theater in 1999, the nonprofit Association for the Colonial Theatre has steadily transformed it into an art, independent and family film house, and a community center open seven days a week.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Helen Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
When The Blob arrived at the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville in 1957, it literally oozed through the old movie house, swallowing up people and sending extras, playing moviegoers, running into the street, screaming in fear. Today, The Blob symbolizes the renaissance of the historic theater, which fell on hard times after the movie was shot there. The Blob, a sludgelike creature with a vast appetite that arrived in Chester County inside a meteor, put the Colonial on the map for fans of sci-fi flicks and nostalgic Americana.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The irreverent fun of Tony Richardson's Tom Jones (1963) is the overlay of 1960s bawdiness on this 1740s Henry Fielding story of a randy bastard child (Albert Finney) adopted by that pillar of rectitude, Squire Allworthy (George Devine). According to Hollywood lore, Richardson was unhappy with the stuffy costume drama he shot. So he used lightning edits and an ironic voice-over to give it the pep and wit of Fielding's 18th-century novel about whether nature or nurture makes the man. The results won Tom Jones an Oscar for best picture, catapulted Finney to international stardom, and still amuses audiences today, although Susannah York's 1963 coif looks as anachronistic as a peruke at a beach party.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Whenever the inevitable desert-island conversation comes up - as in which one movie would you pack? - I always think Ninotchka (1939). It stars Greta Garbo as a Communist envoy and Melvyn Douglas as a capitalist fool who meet up in Paris. They are temperamental as well as political opposites, she being as pragmatic as he is romantic, as puritanical as he is pleasure-loving. When he goes into seduction mode, she initially resists him, shrugging, "Love is a romantic designation for a most ordinary biological, or shall we say, chemical, process.
NEWS
June 1, 2015
Bunny Lake  is Missing Colonial Theatre, Phoenixville, 2 p.m. Sunday Otto Preminger's 1965 psychological mystery, shot in widescreen black-and-white, stars Carol Lynley as a woman who reports her 5-year-old missing from a London nursery school. Laurence Olivier is the police inspector on the case and the Zombies are on TV (singing "Just Out of Reach") in this cool, ahead-of-its-time thriller. Also in the cast: Keir Dullea and Noel Coward. Info for this and other film and live events at the Colonial: www.TheColonialTheatre.com Flicker: Your Brain on Movies Jeffrey M. Zacks , Oxford University Press, 360 pp, $26.95 Zacks, a psychology professor at Washington University in St. Louis, starts his perceptive, passionate examination of how we watch movies with a gem of a Martin Scorsese quote: "Whenever I hear people dismiss movies as 'fantasy' and make a hard distinction between film and life, I think to myself that it's just a way of avoiding the power of cinema.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Five years ago, when Stephen Berger moved to Phoenixville and saw the Colonial Theatre, he thought to himself, "That's the perfect home for a film festival. " So Berger started the Phoenixville Independent Film Festival the next year. This Saturday, it'll be the fourth year of the Phoenixville Independent Film Festival, a selection of 10 shorts less than 15 minutes long. There are a few films from Chester County, as well as some from as far away as France. Jeffrey Gangwisch of Downingtown created Radio, a comedy/mystery based on nostalgic fireside chats on radio shows.
NEWS
December 13, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
It may not be surprising that every year in Phoenixville, a town of homegrown festivals and wacky artists, a sculpture of a phoenix is set on fire. This year, the wooden sculpture will be set ablaze at 8 p.m. Saturday during the town's Firebird Festival. Organizer Lynn Miller said, "The town was named for the bird," a symbol of rebirth. Legend goes that in 1813, the founder of the town's first iron company had a vision of a phoenix emerging from the flames and named his company Phoenix Works.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts continues its 27th Philadelphia International Children's Festival through Saturday with kids' activities, dance, music, and theatrical performances. At noon Friday, the Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble will perform. The festival features Friday and Saturday shows, beginning at 10 a.m., including American Indian storytelling; dance; music by Grammy-winning singer Thirza Defoe; puppeteer Basil Twist's Petrushka ; and Vancouver-based recycled-materials drummers and athletic choreography group ScrapArtsMusic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Celebrate pi - and pie! - on Saturday as the fun begins four minutes early at the Franklin Institute. In honor of the mathematical constant pi, the institute will open at 9:26 a.m. instead of 9:30. Why? The first eight digits of pi are 3.1415 926 , so on 3/14/15 it makes sense to open at 9:26. Pi Day will feature a pi station where guests can learn about the number's significance and measure it without doing complicated math. There will be catapult pie launching and plain old pie-eating, plus the presence of Pi Day mascot Pi Man. Those at the door at 9:26 a.m. will be entered in a raffle to win a year of free family membership.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows a princess. (Sometimes one is born to you, sometimes you marry one - sometimes both.) Based more on the 1939 Shirley Temple classic film than the great 1905 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Alfonso Cuarón's film A Little Princess is no fairy tale, but it is gorgeous. The 1995 gem is unfortunately little known, but well worth a look for the Emmanuel Lubezki cinematography as well as the affecting story of a young aristocratic girl whose fortunes take a turn for the worse when her father is lost in World War I. Those of a certain age may be surprised to see Eleanor Bron (the ingenue of the Beatles' Help!
NEWS
October 8, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
COMIC Paul Reiser and "Dirty Dancing" star Jennifer Grey star in the new Amazon Studios comedy series " Red Oaks ," which premieres this Friday. But stand-up comedy was much on Reiser's mind when he spoke with Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray in Beverly Hills, Calif., earlier this year. He's been doing more stand-up gigs in the past two years than he had in 20, he said. "I've been doing it at a very gentlemanly pace. I just kind of missed it. " Asked how his comedy had changed over the years, he replied: "One of the things that struck me is that it was much more fun, and, not that I had something more to say, [but]
NEWS
June 1, 2015
Bunny Lake  is Missing Colonial Theatre, Phoenixville, 2 p.m. Sunday Otto Preminger's 1965 psychological mystery, shot in widescreen black-and-white, stars Carol Lynley as a woman who reports her 5-year-old missing from a London nursery school. Laurence Olivier is the police inspector on the case and the Zombies are on TV (singing "Just Out of Reach") in this cool, ahead-of-its-time thriller. Also in the cast: Keir Dullea and Noel Coward. Info for this and other film and live events at the Colonial: www.TheColonialTheatre.com Flicker: Your Brain on Movies Jeffrey M. Zacks , Oxford University Press, 360 pp, $26.95 Zacks, a psychology professor at Washington University in St. Louis, starts his perceptive, passionate examination of how we watch movies with a gem of a Martin Scorsese quote: "Whenever I hear people dismiss movies as 'fantasy' and make a hard distinction between film and life, I think to myself that it's just a way of avoiding the power of cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Celebrate pi - and pie! - on Saturday as the fun begins four minutes early at the Franklin Institute. In honor of the mathematical constant pi, the institute will open at 9:26 a.m. instead of 9:30. Why? The first eight digits of pi are 3.1415 926 , so on 3/14/15 it makes sense to open at 9:26. Pi Day will feature a pi station where guests can learn about the number's significance and measure it without doing complicated math. There will be catapult pie launching and plain old pie-eating, plus the presence of Pi Day mascot Pi Man. Those at the door at 9:26 a.m. will be entered in a raffle to win a year of free family membership.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For her new album, Gretchen Peters ended up going where, in her estimation, none of her female songwriting peers really had. Blackbirds is a set that unflinchingly confronts aging, and it's haunted by loss and death. "You're not supposed to specifically talk about aging, ever," the 57-year-old songwriter's songwriter says over the phone from her Nashville home. "You're either not supposed to talk about it and try to look as young as you can, or go away. That's the message that women, especially in the entertainment business, get. "I've done my best work, I think, by going to the places that scare me a little bit, and that was definitely one of them.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2013
Paul Christian , a general dentist in Middletown, has been elected president of the Delaware State Dental Society. Wanda Whitted , director of human resources for Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, Philadelphia, has been elected to the board of the Women's Law Project. People's Light & Theatre, a not-for-profit professional theater in Malvern, appointed the following to its board of trustees: Tom Johantgen , vice president, business development and Mid-Atlantic Region sales leader for Sedgwick Insurance Co., formerly Sedgwick CMS; Nicole Sakowitz , a human-resources consultant in the pharmaceutical industry; John Spellman , a retired dentist and active West Chester community member who volunteers as a Rotarian and for the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville; and Brian C. Zwaan , president, chief operating officer and chief lending officer of Penn Liberty Bank.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunday Witchy women Stephen Schwartz and Winnie Holzman's 2003 Wicked takes place in a pre-Dorothy Oz in which two sorcery-college roommates - a smart, green-skinned brunette and a shallow, popular blonde - vie for renown in the Wizard's world. Guess who becomes who? The show goes on at the Academy of Music , Broad and Locust Streets, at 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 1 and 6:30 p.m. next Sunday. Tickets are $40 to $175.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
FAMILY Andrew Wyeth's Birthday Were he alive, this Chester County artist would be 96 today. The museum, rich in Wyeth family works, celebrates with free admission . Brandywine River Museum, 1 Hoffman's Mill Rd., Chadds Ford, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. today, free, 610-388-2700, brandywinemuseum.org. BLOB-Fest Quaint Phoenixville goes all-out in this yearly celebration of all things "The Blob. " The movie screens at the historic Colonial Theatre, and the local branch of Iron Hill Brewery gets in on the act with cherry beer, "BLOBster" bisque and a tinfoil hat contest.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
STILL HAVEN'T bought the old man something special for Father's Day this Sunday? Lucky for you, most dads are still into compact discs for their home and car sound rigs. And the music biz keeps courting this clientele with new CD releases by "catalog artists" boasting a long history and heritage. Herewith some primo examples, affordably available at a store near you. * Eric Clapton flaunts his own senior status with "Old Sock" (Surfdog), cool and comfortable countrypolitan renderings of pop standards like "All of Me," "The Folks Who Live on the Hill" and "Our Love is Here to Stay.
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