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Colorectal Cancer

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NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Get colon cancer test March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. One in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, and more than one-third - about 50,000 a year in the United States and 210,000 a year in Europe - will die from it. When it is detected late, less than 10 percent survive the disease for more than five years. With screening and early detection, the vast majority of these deaths can be prevented. When detected early, more than 90 percent survive.
LIVING
March 9, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The frustrating thing about colorectal cancer is that more than 90 percent of the deaths it causes could be prevented by proper screening, said William Mahood, an Abington gastroenterologist. Unfortunately, only about 25 percent of the people who should be screened each year for the disease are getting tested - and it shows in the nation's mortality statistics. Colorectal cancers kill more than 56,000 people each year, according to the American Cancer Society. Only a little more than one-third of colorectal cancers are found at an early, localized stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1992 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cancer-imaging agent developed by Cytogen Corp. has received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. OncoScint CR/OV, a diagnostic product for colorectal and ovarian cancer, is the first monoclonal, antibody-based, cancer-imaging agent approved in the United States, the Princeton biopharmaceutical company said in its announcement yesterday. OncoScint was licensed by the FDA "for use in patients with known ovarian or colorectal cancer in whom recurrent or metastatic disease is suspected," the agency said in a statement.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Peg Bradford lost a grandmother to colon cancer, and knew her family was right when they nagged her to get checked. But she dreaded the unpleasant prep required for a colonoscopy and the slim possibility that her colon would be punctured during the procedure. "I was a scaredy cat. I didn't want to deal with it," Bradford said. "I built my own fears up and put it off. " In December, shortly after turning 50, her South Jersey gastroenterologist discovered four polyps, fleshy growths sprouting from the walls of the colon that sometimes turn cancerous.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A daily dose of aspirin can help prevent both heart disease and colorectal cancer in adults age 50 to 69 who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, an independent panel of medical experts said Monday. The final recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that low-dose aspirin - typically, 81 mg - is most beneficial for people age 50 to 59. For adults 60 to 69, a decision should be made with their doctors because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, the panel said.
NEWS
June 4, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD WELFARE A reason for change I applaud social worker SaraKay Smullens' commentary about the Philadelphia Department of Human Services and the city's reaction to the downgrading of DHS's license because of failures in our system. Smullens' approach is refreshing: Use this rebuke to improve our system, not to spend money we don't have arguing about whether the downgrade is warranted. As a pediatrician in Philadelphia for more than 30 years, I know - as do the many others who work with our most vulnerable citizens - that the goodwill and hard work of most of the DHS staff are not sufficient when caseloads are too heavy, services are fragmented and limited, and support - financial and philosophical - is inadequate.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
When evaluating lower gastrointestinal bleeding, it is important to rule out the most dangerous potential causes - such as colorectal cancer . All adults over 50 should have a screening colonoscopy every 10 years, more often if they have a history of polyps. Another possible cause of blood in the stool is inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's or ulcerative colitis), which is an inflammation of all or part of the gastrointestinal tract. Diverticular disease , small out-pouchings of colonic tissue that may become inflamed, can also cause bleeding.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
NEWS
June 4, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD WELFARE A reason for change I applaud social worker SaraKay Smullens' commentary about the Philadelphia Department of Human Services and the city's reaction to the downgrading of DHS's license because of failures in our system. Smullens' approach is refreshing: Use this rebuke to improve our system, not to spend money we don't have arguing about whether the downgrade is warranted. As a pediatrician in Philadelphia for more than 30 years, I know - as do the many others who work with our most vulnerable citizens - that the goodwill and hard work of most of the DHS staff are not sufficient when caseloads are too heavy, services are fragmented and limited, and support - financial and philosophical - is inadequate.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
When evaluating lower gastrointestinal bleeding, it is important to rule out the most dangerous potential causes - such as colorectal cancer . All adults over 50 should have a screening colonoscopy every 10 years, more often if they have a history of polyps. Another possible cause of blood in the stool is inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's or ulcerative colitis), which is an inflammation of all or part of the gastrointestinal tract. Diverticular disease , small out-pouchings of colonic tissue that may become inflamed, can also cause bleeding.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. said Mondaythe Food and Drug Administration has granted "breakthrough therapy designation" for its Keytruda medicine to treat relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer. The company said the designation, intended to expedite the development and review of drugs that treat serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions, is the fourth "breakthrough therapy" status for Keytruda, a humanized monoclonal antibody that works by increasing the ability of the body's immune system to help detect and fight tumor cells.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A daily dose of aspirin can help prevent both heart disease and colorectal cancer in adults age 50 to 69 who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, an independent panel of medical experts said Monday. The final recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that low-dose aspirin - typically, 81 mg - is most beneficial for people age 50 to 59. For adults 60 to 69, a decision should be made with their doctors because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, the panel said.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Peg Bradford lost a grandmother to colon cancer, and knew her family was right when they nagged her to get checked. But she dreaded the unpleasant prep required for a colonoscopy and the slim possibility that her colon would be punctured during the procedure. "I was a scaredy cat. I didn't want to deal with it," Bradford said. "I built my own fears up and put it off. " In December, shortly after turning 50, her South Jersey gastroenterologist discovered four polyps, fleshy growths sprouting from the walls of the colon that sometimes turn cancerous.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Get colon cancer test March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. One in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, and more than one-third - about 50,000 a year in the United States and 210,000 a year in Europe - will die from it. When it is detected late, less than 10 percent survive the disease for more than five years. With screening and early detection, the vast majority of these deaths can be prevented. When detected early, more than 90 percent survive.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
JUST AS BACON has permeated our culture - bacon-flavored ice cream, soda, cologne, massage oil, toothpaste, beer - comes word from the esteemed World Health Organization that bacon (along with other processed meats) is no good for you. As if we thought it was. WHO said it increases the chance of cancer. What doesn't? One analysis showed that eating 50 grams (less than 2 ounces) of processed meat daily increases the lifetime chance of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, but because the chance of Americans developing colorectal cancer is only 1 in 20, the risk rises from 5 to 6 percent.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
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