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Colorectal Cancer

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NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Get colon cancer test March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. One in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, and more than one-third - about 50,000 a year in the United States and 210,000 a year in Europe - will die from it. When it is detected late, less than 10 percent survive the disease for more than five years. With screening and early detection, the vast majority of these deaths can be prevented. When detected early, more than 90 percent survive.
LIVING
March 9, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The frustrating thing about colorectal cancer is that more than 90 percent of the deaths it causes could be prevented by proper screening, said William Mahood, an Abington gastroenterologist. Unfortunately, only about 25 percent of the people who should be screened each year for the disease are getting tested - and it shows in the nation's mortality statistics. Colorectal cancers kill more than 56,000 people each year, according to the American Cancer Society. Only a little more than one-third of colorectal cancers are found at an early, localized stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Peg Bradford lost a grandmother to colon cancer, and knew her family was right when they nagged her to get checked. But she dreaded the unpleasant prep required for a colonoscopy and the slim possibility that her colon would be punctured during the procedure. "I was a scaredy cat. I didn't want to deal with it," Bradford said. "I built my own fears up and put it off. " In December, shortly after turning 50, her South Jersey gastroenterologist discovered four polyps, fleshy growths sprouting from the walls of the colon that sometimes turn cancerous.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1992 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cancer-imaging agent developed by Cytogen Corp. has received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. OncoScint CR/OV, a diagnostic product for colorectal and ovarian cancer, is the first monoclonal, antibody-based, cancer-imaging agent approved in the United States, the Princeton biopharmaceutical company said in its announcement yesterday. OncoScint was licensed by the FDA "for use in patients with known ovarian or colorectal cancer in whom recurrent or metastatic disease is suspected," the agency said in a statement.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 40-foot-long, 4-foot-high colon was moved into Philadelphia's JFK Plaza yesterday, beckoning the curious to crawl inside for a peek. The humongous model of the large intestine is on a 20-city tour to educate people about colorectal cancer testing and prevention. "I'm scared of the cancer," said city worker Shirley Palmer-Towns, 32, after she inched through the C-shaped bowel on her hands and knees, past plastic mock-ups of diverticulosis, polyps, cancerous growths and hemorrhoids.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
AN INGENIOUS PLAN Someday, you may be asked to show some genes for ID. The Defense Department is studying the possibility of using "DNA dog tags" to identify GIs killed in combat or accidents. The metal dog tags U.S. military personnel now wear around their necks often are lost in violent deaths. Under the new system, blood samples would be stored so that GIs could be identified by their DNA. THE OPERATIVE THEORY So far, so good for orthopedic surgeons. Amid the furor over doctors' getting AIDS from patients and vice versa, tests by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found only two such surgeons infected with the virus - neither one on the job. But, since the tests were voluntary, the CDC warns that the rate might be higher if orthopedic surgeons - considered to be at high risk for HIV transmission because of their intense work with blood, tissue and bone - knew they were infected and chose not to participate.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
JUST AS BACON has permeated our culture - bacon-flavored ice cream, soda, cologne, massage oil, toothpaste, beer - comes word from the esteemed World Health Organization that bacon (along with other processed meats) is no good for you. As if we thought it was. WHO said it increases the chance of cancer. What doesn't? One analysis showed that eating 50 grams (less than 2 ounces) of processed meat daily increases the lifetime chance of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, but because the chance of Americans developing colorectal cancer is only 1 in 20, the risk rises from 5 to 6 percent.
NEWS
March 13, 2007 | By Terri Akman
What if I told you of a great way to lose five pounds in 24 hours and be applauded by the medical community and all those who love you? You'll feel great afterward, learn important information about yourself, and take away color glossies of your experience. Now that I have your attention, I'm talking about my colonoscopy. While I admit I gained most of the weight back, it was a wonderful feeling to see digits on the scale that were reminiscent of my college days, even for a brief amount of time.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. said Mondaythe Food and Drug Administration has granted "breakthrough therapy designation" for its Keytruda medicine to treat relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer. The company said the designation, intended to expedite the development and review of drugs that treat serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions, is the fourth "breakthrough therapy" status for Keytruda, a humanized monoclonal antibody that works by increasing the ability of the body's immune system to help detect and fight tumor cells.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A daily dose of aspirin can help prevent both heart disease and colorectal cancer in adults age 50 to 69 who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, an independent panel of medical experts said Monday. The final recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that low-dose aspirin - typically, 81 mg - is most beneficial for people age 50 to 59. For adults 60 to 69, a decision should be made with their doctors because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, the panel said.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Peg Bradford lost a grandmother to colon cancer, and knew her family was right when they nagged her to get checked. But she dreaded the unpleasant prep required for a colonoscopy and the slim possibility that her colon would be punctured during the procedure. "I was a scaredy cat. I didn't want to deal with it," Bradford said. "I built my own fears up and put it off. " In December, shortly after turning 50, her South Jersey gastroenterologist discovered four polyps, fleshy growths sprouting from the walls of the colon that sometimes turn cancerous.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Get colon cancer test March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. One in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, and more than one-third - about 50,000 a year in the United States and 210,000 a year in Europe - will die from it. When it is detected late, less than 10 percent survive the disease for more than five years. With screening and early detection, the vast majority of these deaths can be prevented. When detected early, more than 90 percent survive.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
JUST AS BACON has permeated our culture - bacon-flavored ice cream, soda, cologne, massage oil, toothpaste, beer - comes word from the esteemed World Health Organization that bacon (along with other processed meats) is no good for you. As if we thought it was. WHO said it increases the chance of cancer. What doesn't? One analysis showed that eating 50 grams (less than 2 ounces) of processed meat daily increases the lifetime chance of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, but because the chance of Americans developing colorectal cancer is only 1 in 20, the risk rises from 5 to 6 percent.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one likes having a colonoscopy - a big reason why the colon cancer screening is underused. Nonetheless, growing research suggests that older folks are having unnecessary colonoscopies. The latest study of routine colonoscopies among people over 70 found that nearly a quarter were getting "potentially inappropriate" tests, based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. Those guidelines say that people at average risk of colon cancer should have a colonoscopy once a decade starting at age 50, and stop at age 75. The rationale is that the disease usually progresses slowly, so people near the end of their lives are unlikely to live longer with early detection and treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Chris Stamp, 70, who as a cockney kid from East London aspired to make a documentary film about the rise of British rock in the 1960s and ended up helping discover and manage a raucous working-class quartet called The Who, died Nov. 24 in Manhattan. The cause was complications of colorectal cancer, his wife, Calixte, said. "I was knocked out," Mr. Stamp recalled in 1966 of the night he first saw The Who perform in 1964. "But the excitement I felt wasn't coming from the group. I couldn't get near enough.
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