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Colorful Character

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NEWS
December 21, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Don Tesauro, the man who owns the land being considered for an Eagles stadium, is a successful entrepreneur, horse breeder, significant political contributor and longtime supporter of Mayor Rendell. He is said to shun publicity, though he is described by many as a colorful character. Although his given name is Domenic, Tesauro goes by Don. "Don is a Damon Runyonesque figure, always difficult to find," Rendell told reporters yesterday. "He comes and goes. He doesn't keep any regular hours.
NEWS
October 1, 2008
MILTON Street's flamboyant bluster has finally come to an end. A 30-month jail term will most likely silence one of Philadelphia's biggest running jokes once and for all. Oh, what a colorful character. Although the IRS will probably never collect the $413,000 Milton owes, it's good to see his bubble has finally been broken. Gerald Jackson, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"One Tough Cop" is based on a former New York cop named Bo Dietl, by all accounts a colorful character. But not colorful enough. Though Stephen Baldwin is brought in to ape Dietl's mannerisms and accent and habit of beating people up, the movie's story is largely fictionalized. At least we assume it is, because it's not possible that the life of an actual person could contain so many cliches. In place of biography, we get a Hollywood cops-and-robbers melodrama so stale it dates back to Bogart and Cagney - two neighborhood chums, one becomes a mobster, the other a cop. All that's missing is Pat O'Brien as the priest who knew them both as kids.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | by David Kronke, Los Angeles Daily News
CUPID & CATE, 9 p.m. Sunday, Channel 3. "Cupid & Cate," based on a novel with the significantly less alliterative title "Cupid and Diana," could've been structured a little more efficiently. The romantic telefilm spends its first hour spinning its narrative wheels, protractedly spelling out its fairly simplistic plot complications; then, in 15 minutes, a whole bunch of things happen. The final 45 minutes are given over to the rote resolution of that brief, calamitous spurt of narrative.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler is hardly an agreeable person. In the course of the play named for her, she acts horribly toward everyone around, mistreating an ex-lover so badly that she becomes an accessory in his death. Why does Hedda do these things? Is she an intelligent, independent, passionate woman, disgusted that she has surrendered to social convention and taking out her frustrations on everyone she encounters? Or is she just a mean- spirited troublemaker? The first interpretation would seem not only to be more worthy of a playwright of Ibsen's stature, but also to hold more theatrical possibilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
IF PROFESSIONAL women really want to get ahead, then they have to stop acting like bitches. That's what the daughter of the late Eagles owner Leonard Tose told me when I interviewed her recently about her business self-help book for women. "You know they're always called bitches. Well, why? Because they act like them. Think about it. They kind of try to sabotage a guy. Or they'll talk behind his back," said Susan Tose Spencer, who back in the '80s was general counsel and vice president of the Eagles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The timeliness of Someone Who'll Watch Over Me, Frank McGuinness' 1991 play inspired by the taking of hostages in Lebanon in the 1980s, may have faded. But even without recent accounts of the terrible ordeal the imprisoned men suffered to deepen a theatergoer's reaction, the drama is engrossing business. The eloquent play, which the Vagabond Acting Troupe is presenting at Montgomery County Cultural Center and which will play Center City's Theatre Double March 18 to 20, takes place in a windowless room somewhere in Lebanon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Vox Theater Company says it is "committed to exploring the psycho- physical connection of the human being. " The adaptation of the novel The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde it is presenting as its inaugural production certainly fits that philosophy. Robert Louis Stevenson's 1886 story about a physician who develops a potion that concentrates the evil side of his nature into a separate personality is a case study on how the mind can affect an individual's beavior. In the extreme instance imagined by Stevenson, the state of mind is even reflected in Hyde's monstrous appearance.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael "Mike Reno" Garbesi, 53, a freelance photographer of political, entertainment and sports stars, died Tuesday at his home in South Philadelphia. Mr. Garbesi, known throughout Philadelphia as "Mike Reno," often cruised the city with cameras hanging off his neck and a press pass identifying him as a representative of the Philadelphia Exclusive News. "He was a self-employed freelance photographer and sold advertisements for the paper," said J.J. Palumbo, owner of the Exclusive News.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas. Vin Diesel, wearing a lug's smile and a head of hair, portrays Giacomo "Jackie Dee" DiNorscio, a career soldier with the New Jersey Lucchese crime clan. Busted in a drug deal, Jackie Dee's been sent to prison, but the feds are willing to shorten his time - and serve him some fine cuisine - if he testifies against his cohorts and pals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
As nicknames go, "NoBe" and "SoHo by the Shore" are catchier, and carry more cachet, than "Redevelopment Zone. " That dull label for the Ventnor neighborhood now known as North Beach was a legacy of the last decade, when the city sought to revitalize the section between Little Rock Avenue and the border with Atlantic City from the Bay to the Boardwalk. Ventnor's overly ambitious, if not draconian, proposal to tear down/transform chunks of the 26-block residential and commercial area foundered and sank.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
IF PROFESSIONAL women really want to get ahead, then they have to stop acting like bitches. That's what the daughter of the late Eagles owner Leonard Tose told me when I interviewed her recently about her business self-help book for women. "You know they're always called bitches. Well, why? Because they act like them. Think about it. They kind of try to sabotage a guy. Or they'll talk behind his back," said Susan Tose Spencer, who back in the '80s was general counsel and vice president of the Eagles.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
The "Mayor of Girard Avenue" is just one of many vibrant characters to roam through the corridors of power at City Hall. Here are three others: Ronald DeMarco pretended to be a newsman who covered City Hall and sports teams, according to a 1995 Daily News article. He would carry a microphone, a video camera, a Nikon camera and a "tattered cassette tape recorder. " He was not exactly popular. He reportedly took pictures of female reporters while at news conferences and stalked a radio reporter.
NEWS
October 1, 2008
MILTON Street's flamboyant bluster has finally come to an end. A 30-month jail term will most likely silence one of Philadelphia's biggest running jokes once and for all. Oh, what a colorful character. Although the IRS will probably never collect the $413,000 Milton owes, it's good to see his bubble has finally been broken. Gerald Jackson, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 22, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looked more like a casting call for Guys and Dolls than an arraignment. Twenty-four lawyers and 24 defendants crammed into a small courtroom in Atlantic County Superior Court here Monday to answer gambling and racketeering charges tied to "Operation High Roller," a New Jersey State Police investigation that has attracted national attention. The lawyers wore expensive tailored suits, starched shirts, and patterned ties. The defendants favored striped polo shirts or floral-print Tommy Bahamas with just a hint of bling - a Rolex here, a thin gold neck chain there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas. Vin Diesel, wearing a lug's smile and a head of hair, portrays Giacomo "Jackie Dee" DiNorscio, a career soldier with the New Jersey Lucchese crime clan. Busted in a drug deal, Jackie Dee's been sent to prison, but the feds are willing to shorten his time - and serve him some fine cuisine - if he testifies against his cohorts and pals.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A delectable fusion of Big Night and The Sopranos, Dinner Rush - the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema's opening-night entry (and entree) - combines culinary drama and mob intrigue, Montauk lobster in a shallot champagne sauce and a couple of made guys from Queens trying to muscle in on some trendy restaurant action. Set in a swank Tribeca trattoria, director Bob Giraldi's affectionate salute to testy chefs, valiant line cooks, moody maitre d's and hard-pressed waitstaffs strikes a nice balance between self-mocking comedy and tender drama.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | by David Kronke, Los Angeles Daily News
CUPID & CATE, 9 p.m. Sunday, Channel 3. "Cupid & Cate," based on a novel with the significantly less alliterative title "Cupid and Diana," could've been structured a little more efficiently. The romantic telefilm spends its first hour spinning its narrative wheels, protractedly spelling out its fairly simplistic plot complications; then, in 15 minutes, a whole bunch of things happen. The final 45 minutes are given over to the rote resolution of that brief, calamitous spurt of narrative.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The timeliness of Someone Who'll Watch Over Me, Frank McGuinness' 1991 play inspired by the taking of hostages in Lebanon in the 1980s, may have faded. But even without recent accounts of the terrible ordeal the imprisoned men suffered to deepen a theatergoer's reaction, the drama is engrossing business. The eloquent play, which the Vagabond Acting Troupe is presenting at Montgomery County Cultural Center and which will play Center City's Theatre Double March 18 to 20, takes place in a windowless room somewhere in Lebanon.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"One Tough Cop" is based on a former New York cop named Bo Dietl, by all accounts a colorful character. But not colorful enough. Though Stephen Baldwin is brought in to ape Dietl's mannerisms and accent and habit of beating people up, the movie's story is largely fictionalized. At least we assume it is, because it's not possible that the life of an actual person could contain so many cliches. In place of biography, we get a Hollywood cops-and-robbers melodrama so stale it dates back to Bogart and Cagney - two neighborhood chums, one becomes a mobster, the other a cop. All that's missing is Pat O'Brien as the priest who knew them both as kids.
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