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NEWS
May 15, 2001
Do you think young people are becoming more violent? If you answered yes, you're not alone. A recent study . . . reports that 62 percent of the American public think that youth crime is on the rise. . . . [But] youth crime is at its lowest level in decades. The FBI Uniform Crime Reports showed that between 1993 and 1999, youth homicides decreased 68 percent to their lowest rate since 1966. Columnist Jane Twomey Baltimore Sun, May 14
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | By Rachel Simon
Columbine has left one certain legacy. "There's a lot of paranoia since Colorado," notes Anthony Guarna, chief juvenile probation officer for Montgomery County. We flinch at the sight of teenagers in black trench coats. We interpret every threatening comment as if it were a loaded gun. A never-before-in-trouble kid, Sean Kelley, 17, was a sophomore at Norristown Area High School, a budding rock singer, a Boy Scout, and an aspiring jewelry maker. His crash course in post-Columbine paranoia started a week after Colorado, when his social studies teacher encouraged discussion on the tragedy.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Finnish man and the Plymouth Meeting kid may have been separated by 4,100 miles, but they were drawn together by a shared obsession: Columbine. More than eight years after the bloodiest high school massacre in U.S. history, Columbine has become a towering symbol of retribution and martyrdom among would-be imitators far beyond Littleton, Colo. To some sympathizers, including 14-year-old Dillon Cossey, whose plan to attack Plymouth Whitemarsh High School was thwarted by police last month, Columbine killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold have ascended to the status of folk heroes.
LIVING
April 16, 2000 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ted Mingle listened as a high school student prayed at a youth group meeting he was leading. "She prayed for more time in the day so she could get all of her schoolwork done," recalled Mingle, the director of youth and young adults at Media Presbyterian Church for the last four years. The prayer surprised Mingle. It led him to realize the pressures facing young people, from academics to relationships, from drug use to security. There are also the underlying issues that go with them: respect, character, morals and ethics.
NEWS
October 30, 2007 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The heroics of a 14-year-old Plymouth Meeting boy in defusing another teen's plans for a Columbine-like school assault culminated in a presidential handshake yesterday. Lew Bennett III was one of about a dozen people selected to greet President Bush as he exited Air Force One at Philadelphia International Airport. "The president wanted to thank him for doing the right thing," said White House spokesman Alex Conant. Bush was here for a private fund-raiser in Bryn Mawr at the home of John M. Templeton expected to raise $500,000 for GOP candidates.
NEWS
April 16, 2004 | By Troy Graham and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A Camden County teenager accused of telling two girls that Lindenwold High School was "going to become another Columbine" was arrested yesterday and charged with making terroristic threats. The boy, whom authorities did not identify because of his age, had no guns or access to weapons when he was detained around 2 a.m., but prosecutors said they could take no chances with the kind of threats he had made. "We always try to err on the side of caution," said Camden County Prosecutor Vincent P. Sarubbi.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Sixteen-year-old Shannon Keefe disobeyed her parents yesterday, and may have saved her life doing it. The Columbine High School junior left school to get lunch at the food court at the Southwest Plaza mall near the school, despite the repeated instructions of her parents. As it turned out, she left Columbine at 11:30 a.m., only minutes before two gunmen burst into the school, slaying as many as 25 students. The gunmen also died, apparently of self-inflicted wounds. And, as it turned out, her dad, Greg Thomas, Connective Energy communication executive, was able to rush back to Littleton aboard United Airlines Flight 1517 from Philadelphia last night, and look forward to hugging Shannon and his two other children.
NEWS
April 25, 2001
[During the Columbine crisis,] every few minutes, the announcer would cut in to say that the White House would have a statement from the president on the incident shortly. . . . And all I could think was: Why? Why would the president say anything about this, especially at this moment? . . . More importantly, why does anyone expect him to say anything? . . . This makes no sense, but then, it's not supposed to. It's about emotion, not reason. But for my money, there are far too many actions and decisions taken in the public sphere on the basis of emotion already.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | By Michael Sandler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In May, Lt. Michael Kazlo, station commander for the state police Avondale barracks, took a vacation with his family to New York's Adirondack Mountains. It was just weeks after two students killed several classmates and a teacher at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. Relaxed, Kazlo tuned in the radio. In a small town on the New York-Vermont line, he listened as local stations reported bomb threats at several schools. "You can go to the hinterlands and you can't get away from this problem," Kazlo said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | By JAMI BERNARD New York Daily News
You don't need a bullet through the gut to know that gun culture touches everyone. The impressive "American Gun" takes strategic aim to make sure everyone sees the trickle-down effect. From Columbine to the modern phenomenon of "going postal," there are few people whose lives are untouched by guns - once you take into account those who shoot, those who get shot, those who care about them and even those whose schools use metal detectors. "American Gun" uses a "Crash"-style melding of separate but thematically related stories to underscore - effectively - how we're all in this together.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Steven Dubois, Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. - An Oregon teenager intended to blow up his school in a plot "forged and inspired by the model of the Columbine shootings" and he will be charged with attempted aggravated murder, a prosecutor said late Saturday. Grant Acord, 17, will be charged as an adult and also faces six counts of manufacturing and possessing a destructive device after investigators found six bombs in a secret compartment in his bedroom, Benton County District Attorney John Haroldson said. Acord was taken to a juvenile jail Thursday night after police received a tip that he was making a bomb to blow up West Albany High School, about 75 miles south of Portland.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University sent an advisory to students and staff Friday informing them that police were investigating a graffiti threat found in a bathroom last month that mentioned the April 20 anniversary of the deadly shootings at Columbine High School. Ray Betzner, a university spokesman, said Temple police had been investigating since a student reported finding the message scrawled in a men's room stall in Gladfelter Hall several weeks ago. "Recent news reports have raised concerns about safety at Temple University," the advisory from Temple police began.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University sent an advisory to students and staff today informing them that police are investigating a graffiti threat found in a bathroom last month that mentioned the April 20 anniversary of the deadly shootings at Columbine High School. Ray Betzner, a university spokesman, said Temple Police have been investigating since a student reported finding the message scrawled in a men's room stall in Gladfelter Hall several weeks ago. "Recent news reports have raised concerns about safety at Temple University," the advisory from Temple Police began.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only minutes after signing off his new CNN show, The Lead With Jake Tapper , the host is in his Washington office - talking Philly, circa 1987. "When I left, it was before the Blue Route, before the Vine Street corridor," Tapper, 44, is saying. "William Penn's hat was still the tallest thing in the city. " Tapper grew up in Queen Village, in the house where his mother, Anne Tapper, still lives. "That Philly wasn't as fancy as today's Philly is," he says. His parents "split when I was 8. " His father, Ted Tapper, is a retired pediatrician living in Lower Merion; Anne is a retired psychiatric nurse.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
This originally appeared on Ellen Gray's blog, ellengray.tv. I'm almost afraid to add one word to the story of Friday's Connecticut school shootings for fear of adding to the wealth of the day's misinformation. But having spent much of the afternoon watching what passed for coverage of this horror, I can't help but be struck by how little television news has learned since Columbine about these things. As I write this, there are conflicting reports about the identity of the shooter, the location in which another body, said to be the shooter's mother, was found and other things that some networks sounded pretty sure about an hour or so ago. I've seen multiple reruns of an interview with a remarkably well-spoken little girl whose interrogation by a reporter, aired on CNN, would have been described as "leading the witness," if it took place in a courtroom.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Tuesday is the 11th anniversary of 9/11. And three months later, we will mark the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The two worst attacks on American soil each resulted in nearly 3,000 deaths and led the nation to war. Still, given the passage of time, Dec. 7 will be noted with minimal, if any, reverence by most Americans, and, despite little more than a decade having lapsed since 9/11, already some memories are fading too fast....
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
The movie theater massacre that took place in Aurora, Colo., early Friday morning unfolded about 15 miles from the scene of the Columbine High School shootings. Residents of Littleton, Colo., who lived through that 1999 rampage were badly shaken Friday by news of the latest bloodshed. The shooting at a midnight screening of the new Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises , killed 12 people and injured 58. The Columbine shooting killed 12 students and one teacher; the two gunmen took their own lives as well.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | Associated Press
LITTLETON, Colo. - Authorities reviewed security video yesterday from a Colorado mall where the discovery of a pipe bomb and two propane tanks after a fire raised concerns about a possible link to the Columbine High School attack. The blaze coincided with the 12th anniversary of the deadly shooting two miles away. "We're concerned about the date, the time, things of that nature, but we don't have anything solid that would indicate any link at all other than, certainly, circumstances," Jefferson County Sheriff Ted Mink said.
NEWS
April 19, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham and Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Some schools have banned backpacks. Others have locked doors, installed cameras, bought metal detectors, and started disaster drills. Ten years ago tomorrow, two teenagers killed 13 people and wounded 23 others inside Columbine High School in suburban Littleton, Colo., a massacre that forever altered the nation's school-security landscape. "We used to just worry about drugs and alcohol, but now we're all overwhelmed by this fear that our children aren't safe in schools," said Al Hall, director of security for the Hatboro-Horsham School District.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Finnish man and the Plymouth Meeting kid may have been separated by 4,100 miles, but they were drawn together by a shared obsession: Columbine. More than eight years after the bloodiest high school massacre in U.S. history, Columbine has become a towering symbol of retribution and martyrdom among would-be imitators far beyond Littleton, Colo. To some sympathizers, including 14-year-old Dillon Cossey, whose plan to attack Plymouth Whitemarsh High School was thwarted by police last month, Columbine killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold have ascended to the status of folk heroes.
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