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NEWS
April 15, 2005
The writer of the April 14 letter "Wrong about Pope" claims that I blamed John Paul II for 12 million AIDS deaths. In fact, I wrote that AIDS killed tens of millions, and I highlighted the plight of 12 million children orphaned by AIDS. I did not blame the Pope for the deaths. I pointed out, however, that in the face of this catastrophe, he refused to ease his opposition to the use of condoms, which can slow the spread of the disease. Frida Ghitis Atlanta
SPORTS
May 26, 2011 | Daily News Staff Report
Sam Smith, the highly respected NBA columnist whose career has spanned more than quarter of a century, is being honored as the inaugural winner of the Phil Jasner Lifetime Achievement Award by the Professional Basketball Writers Association, the group announced yesterday. Smith, who has covered the NBA since 1983 and is now the columnist for Bulls.com, will be honored tonight during Game 5 of the Eastern Conference final between the Bulls and Miami Heat. Jasner, a longtime Sixers beat writer for the Daily News , died in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Alsop and his brother, Stewart, were kingpins of the opinion pages after World War II, when syndicated columnists meant fear and respect in an era before the Internet empowered everyone to be a publisher. David Auburn's new historical drama "The Columnist" illuminates the different sides of Joseph Alsop, who went on to write the column alone _ and in about 200 newspapers — after Stewart became a reporter for The Saturday Evening Post. In "The Columnist," which packs a tidy punch in a down-to-earth telling, Alsop is a mercurial know-it-all who was a curmudgeon long before he reached the age when such crankiness is tolerable, if not excusable.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | BY NAVEED AHSAN, Daily News Staff Writer ahsann@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
CHUCK STONE, 89, a legendary former Daily News columnist and former Tuskegee Airman, died today. Stone died in his sleep early this morning at an assisted-living home in Farmington, N.C., relatives said. From 1972 to 1991, he was a columnist for the Daily News . He was such a trusted figure in Philadelphia that more than 75 murder suspects surrendered to Stone rather than to law-enforcement authorities. Stone was the first president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | STAFF REPORT
Inquirer columnist Bob Ford is the recipient of the prestigious David F. Woods Award for his column on the relationship between Fair Hill Training Center-based trainers Graham Motion and Michael Matz. The Woods Award honors the best Preakness story for the previous year and honorees will be recognized and awards presented at the May 17 Alibi Breakfast at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, two days prior to this year's second jewel of the Triple Crown. Here is that column, which was published on May 20, 2011: Motion, Matz, and the variable of fate
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CURRENT AND former journalists will gather tomorrow at a memorial service for former Daily News columnist and senior editor Chuck Stone. Stone died April 6 at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina. He was 89. Stone, an outspoken writer who was so trusted that more than 70 suspects surrendered to him first rather than the police, spent nearly two decades at the Daily News before leaving in 1991 to teach at the University of North Carolina. He was instrumental in the founding of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists and later served as founding president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE LONELY and brutal death of Christina Sankey in 2014 touched and disturbed Ronnie Polaneczky. Ronnie, the Daily News columnist who often has publicized the plight of the lost and forgotten, wrote about Sankey in April 2014. She told how the 37-year-old woman with the mentality of a 3-year-old was found dead on a frigid day in March 2014, half-naked and frozen, sprawled between two parked cars in West Philadelphia. How many other Christina Sankeys does the city harbor? Ronnie wanted to know about those intellectually challenged adults, hidden away and left to an indifferent fate.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adrian I. Lee, 90, a longtime reporter and columnist for the Bulletin, died of a respiratory infection Wednesday, June 15, at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Roxborough. Mr. Lee joined the Evening Bulletin in 1948 as a general assignment and police reporter. He later was a rewrite man, a national reporter, and an editorial writer, and was a conservative columnist when the paper closed in 1982. In 1998, Mr. Lee contributed an essay for a collection of reminiscences about the Bulletin, titled "I Loved Every Minute.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As outdoors columnist for The Inquirer, Ben Callaway, a stickler for accuracy, cast a hard eye on depictions he felt were inauthentic - even in a movie. Writing about the opening of bear-hunting season in Pennsylvania in a 1989 column, he took aim at a recently released movie, The Bear . He wrote: "The photography is superb, the scenery is lovely, and the cub in this entertaining story is cuddly cute. But a documentary it ain't. " He hoped "viewers don't substitute this make-believe stuff for factual wildlife biology.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Worldview columnist Trudy Rubin is on vacation.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
AS A columnist, President Donald Trump would be good for me. As a columnist, he offers a large, slow, oddly colored target, something like a ruptured duck that dares you to shoot at him - and attacks you for quoting him accurately. This assumes the columnist can untangle his mangled syntax and sort out the "sarcasm" and "jokes" from serious statements, should there be any. With a President Trump, I would never worry about where my next column was coming from. All I'd have to do is turn to Twitter and see what he had to say (on what I guess would be his presidential Twitter handle: @I'minChargeShutUp)
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Philip H. Joyce wrote his final column in January 1996 as editor of the Inquirer's Commentary Page, he said he had "literally thousands" of regrets. Since he began that work in 1971, he regretted "the many, many pieces that I wanted to get on our pages but for various reasons, mostly space considerations, didn't make the cut. " "Those are the ones that op-editors lose sleep over. " But after reading 200,000 to 300,000 offerings and overseeing the publishing of perhaps 35,000 of them, "I had better quit before I got too smart for myself, or my brain turned to mush.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, STAFF WRITER
Bill Lyon has done it again, striking a chord with readers. Soon after the legendary retired Inquirer sports columnist disclosed he is battling Alzheimer's disease in a piece posted on Philly.com Saturday, and slated for publication in the Sunday Inquirer, a torrent of support from readers followed. Lyon's column, " My Alzheimer's fight: Never, ever quit ," has been shared on Twitter and Facebook, and emailed from friend to family. Online, commenters wrote in to celebrate the sportswriter, to cheer on his fight, and to thank him for sharing his experience.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
Here's some food for thought. Or, rather, here are some thoughts for food. Six months ago, I made a reckless vow. With Donald Trump dominating in the polls, I said I'd eat a column - 18 column inches of toxic newsprint, wood pulp, ink, and all - if he won the Republican presidential nomination. My rationale: "Americans are better than Trump," and Republican primary voters wouldn't nominate "a candidate who expresses the bigotry and misogyny that Trump has. " This prediction still looks viable.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
I recognized the setting immediately. The high ceilings, giant windows streaming natural light, marble floors, verdant plantings, and decoratively incorporated bedrock. I knew at once it was the Palacio de la Revolucion. And from what I saw of President Obama's trip on television last week, the home to brothers Fidel and Raul Castro has changed little in the 14 years since I was there as a columnist, as part of a small delegation accompanying Sen. Arlen Specter. The 2002 trip was a return visit for Specter, who met with Fidel Castro in 1999 while researching his memoir, Passion for Truth . The architect of what he called the single-bullet "conclusion" had wanted the perspective of the Cuban dictator, whom many believe played a role in the Kennedy assassination.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
LEGENDARY Daily News personal-finance columnist and radio talk-show host Harry S. Gross, 92, died of heart failure Sunday at his home in Rydal. Mr. Gross was a trailblazer in local media, providing financial advice to consumers. In 1978, he started a call-in radio program that ran for more than 20 years on Philadelphia radio stations WCAU and WWDB. He wrote his personal-finance column for the Daily News from 1981 until his retirement late last year. Among his mantras were "Live beneath your means," and "If it sounds too good to be true, it is too good to be true.
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