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NEWS
April 15, 2005
The writer of the April 14 letter "Wrong about Pope" claims that I blamed John Paul II for 12 million AIDS deaths. In fact, I wrote that AIDS killed tens of millions, and I highlighted the plight of 12 million children orphaned by AIDS. I did not blame the Pope for the deaths. I pointed out, however, that in the face of this catastrophe, he refused to ease his opposition to the use of condoms, which can slow the spread of the disease. Frida Ghitis Atlanta
SPORTS
May 26, 2011 | Daily News Staff Report
Sam Smith, the highly respected NBA columnist whose career has spanned more than quarter of a century, is being honored as the inaugural winner of the Phil Jasner Lifetime Achievement Award by the Professional Basketball Writers Association, the group announced yesterday. Smith, who has covered the NBA since 1983 and is now the columnist for Bulls.com, will be honored tonight during Game 5 of the Eastern Conference final between the Bulls and Miami Heat. Jasner, a longtime Sixers beat writer for the Daily News , died in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Alsop and his brother, Stewart, were kingpins of the opinion pages after World War II, when syndicated columnists meant fear and respect in an era before the Internet empowered everyone to be a publisher. David Auburn's new historical drama "The Columnist" illuminates the different sides of Joseph Alsop, who went on to write the column alone _ and in about 200 newspapers — after Stewart became a reporter for The Saturday Evening Post. In "The Columnist," which packs a tidy punch in a down-to-earth telling, Alsop is a mercurial know-it-all who was a curmudgeon long before he reached the age when such crankiness is tolerable, if not excusable.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY A YOUNGSTER with the sounds of newspaper presses thundering in their dreams had one great wish: They wanted to be a Sandy Grady when they grew up. Sandy could mold a sentence into a work of art, no matter the subject, from boxing to the Olympics to baseball to the political scene, all of which he graced with a fluid style that never seemed to bump. Some of his memorable words still ring like a punch in the funny bone. He once wrote of an unpopular Eagles coach: "He couldn't sell iced tea to a Tasmanian at a dried-up water hole.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | BY NAVEED AHSAN, Daily News Staff Writer ahsann@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
CHUCK STONE, 89, a legendary former Daily News columnist and former Tuskegee Airman, died today. Stone died in his sleep early this morning at an assisted-living home in Farmington, N.C., relatives said. From 1972 to 1991, he was a columnist for the Daily News . He was such a trusted figure in Philadelphia that more than 75 murder suspects surrendered to Stone rather than to law-enforcement authorities. Stone was the first president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | STAFF REPORT
Inquirer columnist Bob Ford is the recipient of the prestigious David F. Woods Award for his column on the relationship between Fair Hill Training Center-based trainers Graham Motion and Michael Matz. The Woods Award honors the best Preakness story for the previous year and honorees will be recognized and awards presented at the May 17 Alibi Breakfast at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, two days prior to this year's second jewel of the Triple Crown. Here is that column, which was published on May 20, 2011: Motion, Matz, and the variable of fate
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CURRENT AND former journalists will gather tomorrow at a memorial service for former Daily News columnist and senior editor Chuck Stone. Stone died April 6 at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina. He was 89. Stone, an outspoken writer who was so trusted that more than 70 suspects surrendered to him first rather than the police, spent nearly two decades at the Daily News before leaving in 1991 to teach at the University of North Carolina. He was instrumental in the founding of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists and later served as founding president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE LONELY and brutal death of Christina Sankey in 2014 touched and disturbed Ronnie Polaneczky. Ronnie, the Daily News columnist who often has publicized the plight of the lost and forgotten, wrote about Sankey in April 2014. She told how the 37-year-old woman with the mentality of a 3-year-old was found dead on a frigid day in March 2014, half-naked and frozen, sprawled between two parked cars in West Philadelphia. How many other Christina Sankeys does the city harbor? Ronnie wanted to know about those intellectually challenged adults, hidden away and left to an indifferent fate.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adrian I. Lee, 90, a longtime reporter and columnist for the Bulletin, died of a respiratory infection Wednesday, June 15, at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Roxborough. Mr. Lee joined the Evening Bulletin in 1948 as a general assignment and police reporter. He later was a rewrite man, a national reporter, and an editorial writer, and was a conservative columnist when the paper closed in 1982. In 1998, Mr. Lee contributed an essay for a collection of reminiscences about the Bulletin, titled "I Loved Every Minute.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2015
MY IN-LAWS' family tradition of fighting for civil rights dates back to the earliest days of the NAACP, which concluded its 106th national convention in Philly yesterday. It began when famed sociologist W.E.B. DuBois, author of The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study and The Souls of Black Folk , was a professor at Atlanta University and found himself in need of a secretary. According to family lore, DuBois, one of the NAACP's founders, wrote to Wilberforce University - one of the nation's oldest historically black colleges - where he once had taught, for a recommendation.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE LONELY and brutal death of Christina Sankey in 2014 touched and disturbed Ronnie Polaneczky. Ronnie, the Daily News columnist who often has publicized the plight of the lost and forgotten, wrote about Sankey in April 2014. She told how the 37-year-old woman with the mentality of a 3-year-old was found dead on a frigid day in March 2014, half-naked and frozen, sprawled between two parked cars in West Philadelphia. How many other Christina Sankeys does the city harbor? Ronnie wanted to know about those intellectually challenged adults, hidden away and left to an indifferent fate.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY A YOUNGSTER with the sounds of newspaper presses thundering in their dreams had one great wish: They wanted to be a Sandy Grady when they grew up. Sandy could mold a sentence into a work of art, no matter the subject, from boxing to the Olympics to baseball to the political scene, all of which he graced with a fluid style that never seemed to bump. Some of his memorable words still ring like a punch in the funny bone. He once wrote of an unpopular Eagles coach: "He couldn't sell iced tea to a Tasmanian at a dried-up water hole.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandy Grady, 87, a respected Philadelphia journalist acclaimed for his sportswriting who also covered politics and seven presidents, died Tuesday, April 14, in Reston, Va., after a long battle with kidney cancer. A native of Charlotte, N.C., Mr. Grady arrived in Philadelphia in 1957 to weave tales at the Philadelphia Daily News and then the Bulletin. Frank Bilovsky, a former Bulletin sportswriter, said of Mr. Grady: "He destroyed my 1950s stereotypical view of Southern white men as backward, right-wing bigots.
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS COMING up on Christmas 2000 when David R. Boldt had his customary martini lunch with Santa Claus. Apart from trying and failing to twinkle the way Santa did during their conversations, David had news to impart. He was taking an early retirement after 28 years at the Inquirer as a writer and editor. "What do you hope people say about you?" Santa asked. "I'd like it if someone asked, 'Who was that masked man?' " "This triggered a moment of reverie," David wrote, "and when I turned back, I saw that Santa had quietly left, once again sticking me with the check.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE Daily News already knows that Helen Ubiñas is influential. But it's nice to hear someone else say it, too. The People Paper columnist was recently named one of the Delaware Valley's Most Influential Latinos by Impacto Latin Newspaper, a local news magazine. Impacto created the award in 2005 to "recognize individuals who have made great contributions to the Delaware Valley's Latino community and the community at large," Napoleon Garcia, the magazine's publisher, said in a statement.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
RONNIE Polaneczky's recent column on our ongoing fight to help Philadelphia does little to help those of us fighting to give Philadelphia schools the tools needed to open on time. Instead of enlightening readers on the difficulties we face in educating Philadelphia's 200,000 students, Polaneczky chose to attack the wife of House Majority Leader Mike Turzai as part of an overall assault on the Pennsylvania House of Representatives as we worked to pass enabling legislation for Philadelphia City Council to levy a $2-per-pack cigarette tax to help fund our city's schools.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE RECENT upheavals at John Bartram High School in the city's Elmwood section - the brawling in the halls, classroom disruptions, marijuana in the bathrooms - have upset anyone concerned about public education in the city. No one was more concerned than Daryl Gale, city editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Tribune. Bartram was his alma mater. He had been proud of his school. He wanted the best for it, and what was happening pained him deeply. But more than almost anyone, Daryl was in a position to express his pain in public.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CURRENT AND former journalists will gather tomorrow at a memorial service for former Daily News columnist and senior editor Chuck Stone. Stone died April 6 at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina. He was 89. Stone, an outspoken writer who was so trusted that more than 70 suspects surrendered to him first rather than the police, spent nearly two decades at the Daily News before leaving in 1991 to teach at the University of North Carolina. He was instrumental in the founding of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists and later served as founding president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
JOHN MORRISON'S lengthy obituary on Chuck Stone in Monday's Daily News said a lot, but there was one thing it did not say. It did not say Chuck Stone was the first black columnist at the Daily News . It didn't have to because he was so much more. Many readers' tributes to Chucker (that's what I usually called him) mentioned his hilarious and infuriating "And the Angels Sing" columns, "written" by letter writers and answered by Chucker. In those, the voices of bigotry, racial hatred and assorted animosities flowered, with Chucker in the role of Chance the Gardener - except Chucker would do more than watch.
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