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Combat

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NEWS
April 1, 1993
Gay activists are less interested in military service than in getting mainstream America to accept their lifestyle. The armed forces should not serve their purpose. The debate over reversing the ban on gays in the military - the focal point of Senate Armed Forces Committee hearings that begin March 29 - distresses men and women who have chosen military careers. Many people in uniform, while not denying that some gays have served with distinction, vehemently oppose the entry of avowed homosexuals into the armed forces.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
ON MONDAY, President Obama hailed the pioneers who in 1848 first fought for women's rights at Seneca Falls, N.Y. On Wednesday, Obama's Pentagon sent America's female troops charging up Hamburger Hill, metaphorically speaking. Leon Panetta, the outgoing defense secretary, has decided that for the first time U.S. women troops will be eligible for front-line combat infantry or artillery jobs that have long been restricted to men - first by tradition and after 1994 by official Pentagon policy, according to multiple news accounts.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Women may be able to start training as Army Rangers by mid-2015 and as Navy SEALs a year later under plans set to be announced by the Pentagon that would slowly bring women into thousands of combat jobs, including those in elite special operations forces. Details of the plans were obtained by the Associated Press. They call for requiring women and men to meet the same physical and mental standards to quality for certain infantry, armor, commando, and other front-line positions across the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Kristen Gelineau, Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia - The last known combat veteran of World War I, Claude Stanley Choules, defied the tolls of time - swimming in the sea as a centenarian and publishing his first book at 108. And despite the fame his military service (and longevity) brought him, Mr. Choules later in life became a pacifist, boycotting parades that he felt glorified war. Mr. Choules, a man of humble spirit and wry humor, died in a Western Australia nursing home Thursday at age 110. Although his accomplishments were many - including a 41-year military career that spanned two navies and two World Wars - the man known as "Chuckles" to his comrades in the Australian navy was happiest being known as a family man. "We all loved him," his 84-year-old daughter, Daphne Edinger, said.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
On a recent morning in Cherry Hill, the biggest threat to personal safety seemed to be sun glare. But inside a former warehouse renovated to look more like a gym, about a dozen men and women were training as if their lives depended on it. Literally. They were learning how to spin out of a choke hold, overpower a carjacker, and punch a gun or knife out of an attacker's hands. An unusual fitness trend, for sure - one with Israeli roots and where motivation comes from a sense of insecurity rather than concern over love handles or jiggly thighs.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The road from Baghdad to Fallujah was a deadly gauntlet when Army First Lt. Viviene McNamara made the run in April 2004 and came upon an abandoned civilian convoy. Its trucks had been raked by insurgent gunfire, one driver was slumped in the cab dead, and the rest had fled. The 12 heavy-equipment transporters in McNamara's platoon became the new targets. A Marine in the group's security detail was soon hit while others ducked. McNamara returned fire from the cover of a truck.
NEWS
July 10, 2015
IN A VOTE of confidence, the School Reform Commission last week said it owed Superintendent William Hite what it called a "performance bonus. " It should have been called combat pay. That's the extra pay given to members of the U.S. military who serve in "designated combat zones or hazardous duty areas. " That pretty much describes the Philadelphia School District, certainly in 2012 when Hite took over after the SRC fired Superintendent Arlene Ackerman. They were perilous times, certainly for the students in the District.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The images made conservative politicians and vocal feminists wince: Mothers in combat fatigues kissing their babies goodbye. Cheery-looking Melissa Rathbun-Neely becoming America's first female prisoner of war since World War II. A female pilot, who revels in her role of delivering troops deep into Iraq, dying when her helicopter crashes in non-hostile action. (Five other women were killed in action during the Persian Gulf conflict.) As Operation Desert Shield built up and Desert Storm burst forth, senators and late-night talk show hosts debated the implications of our mothers, daughters, wives and sisters in the military - particularly since there was no line in the sand separating combat from non-combat jobs.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM GUARNERE didn't have to go to war. At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, he was building tanks at the old Baldwin Locomotive Works, a job considered crucial to the war effort and good for an exemption from military service. But Bill didn't take it. He enlisted in the Army paratroops on Aug. 31, 1942, and the rest is legend. "Wild Bill" Guarnere, the nickname he earned as a fearless combat soldier against the Germans, was a member of the legendary "Band of Brothers" - Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division - celebrated in books and an HBO miniseries in 2001.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Women meet combat demands I question the Inquirer's support for opening up combat positions to women on the two main assumptions that no true front lines exist in Iraq and Afghanistan, and that women must meet the same standards as men. ("Women ready for combat," Jan. 27) It is true that women are serving in combat areas. But this is not the same as frontline combat. I deployed to Iraq in 2004 as a Marine Corps field historian. I was in a combat area, but not in combat. To interview Marines at all levels, I traveled in convoys and by helicopter.
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NEWS
July 10, 2015
IN A VOTE of confidence, the School Reform Commission last week said it owed Superintendent William Hite what it called a "performance bonus. " It should have been called combat pay. That's the extra pay given to members of the U.S. military who serve in "designated combat zones or hazardous duty areas. " That pretty much describes the Philadelphia School District, certainly in 2012 when Hite took over after the SRC fired Superintendent Arlene Ackerman. They were perilous times, certainly for the students in the District.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Claudia Vargas, and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
No one hit the deck Thursday, but it was not for lack of trying. The general civility that had marked Philadelphia's Democratic mayoral primary campaign was quickly set aside Thursday during a second televised debate, with Nelson A. Diaz dredging up inflammatory quotes from James F. Kenney's past, T. Milton Street Sr. challenging State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams' management skills, and Williams suggesting that Kenney favored assault weapons....
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day Officers John Todt and Edward Troy completed their training course on Narcan (naloxone) - a drug that can dramatically reverse the effects of a heroin overdose - a woman on Aramingo Avenue flagged them down as they drove past. She pointed to a parking lot. Between two parked cars, the officers could see a woman facedown on the asphalt. When they turned her over, she was blue in the face and barely breathing. Her eyes were open, but unfocused and unresponsive. Troy, an eight-year veteran of the Philadelphia police force, deals with victims of drug overdoses weekly and sometimes daily.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The latest, spaciest album by the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, who play the Theatre of Living Arts on Sunday, is titled Phosphorescent Harvest , and the band is truly committed to all things psychedelic. Robinson does not take free-flowing, high-flying, freak-folk music of the cosmos lightly. You can hear sounds of Quicksilver Messenger Service, Soft Machine, Pearls Before Swine, and Grateful Dead in the music; you can almost smell Topanga Canyon. Told this, Robinson, onetime frontman of the Black Crowes, laughs with a hearty cackle.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY CLAY FITCH
LAST MONTH the movie "American Sniper" opened nationwide with a record box office of $90 million, shattering previous box-office records for January releases. Since its release some controversy has surrounded the movie, and much of the coverage of the movie lately has been related to these controversies. What is lost in this coverage, and much of the discussion of the movie, is the very real depiction of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's struggles with transitioning to civilian life. "American Sniper" portrays Kyle not only during his four tours in Iraq but also in his struggle to return home to a wife, and later a family, that does not fully understand what he has experienced.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
SHARED PROSPERITY Philadelphia - the city's plan to tackle its staggeringly deep poverty rate - has made important strides in its first year of existence, but there's no time for celebration yet. "The challenge is that we're still a desperately poor city," said Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, which oversees the program. "Poverty effects 397,000 people - 123,000 of whom are children - in Philadelphia. " In Shared Prosperity's first progress report, released yesterday at the Uniting to Fight Poverty Summit at Community College of Philadelphia, the success of community partnerships, the greater availability of resources for the poor and increased grant funding were heralded as successes.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Charlie Birnbaum, piano tuner, homeowner, landlord, son of Holocaust survivors and famed eminent domain resister, had a message for Atlantic City about trying to take the family house, which overlooks a vast undeveloped area near the failed Revel casino. "Do you need more of nothing?" he said after final arguments were presented Tuesday to Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez in his dispute with the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA). "I think they have plenty of nothing already.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh and Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Gigi was 5, her mother, Sarah Eisenstein, was getting worried. A big child - born at 10 pounds, 13 ounces - Gigi was gaining weight, as the family dined on hot dogs and ate chips as a snack. Now, Eisenstein cooks eggplant and zucchini fries for Gigi and sister Isabella. Their mother learned these skills at Cooking with Friends, a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia program. Gigi, 8, tall for her age, is at a healthy weight. The program that helped Eisenstein will expand into a community-based study, thanks to a new partnership between Children's and the food service company Aramark, announced Wednesday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia.
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