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Combat

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NEWS
April 1, 1993
Gay activists are less interested in military service than in getting mainstream America to accept their lifestyle. The armed forces should not serve their purpose. The debate over reversing the ban on gays in the military - the focal point of Senate Armed Forces Committee hearings that begin March 29 - distresses men and women who have chosen military careers. Many people in uniform, while not denying that some gays have served with distinction, vehemently oppose the entry of avowed homosexuals into the armed forces.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
ON MONDAY, President Obama hailed the pioneers who in 1848 first fought for women's rights at Seneca Falls, N.Y. On Wednesday, Obama's Pentagon sent America's female troops charging up Hamburger Hill, metaphorically speaking. Leon Panetta, the outgoing defense secretary, has decided that for the first time U.S. women troops will be eligible for front-line combat infantry or artillery jobs that have long been restricted to men - first by tradition and after 1994 by official Pentagon policy, according to multiple news accounts.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Women may be able to start training as Army Rangers by mid-2015 and as Navy SEALs a year later under plans set to be announced by the Pentagon that would slowly bring women into thousands of combat jobs, including those in elite special operations forces. Details of the plans were obtained by the Associated Press. They call for requiring women and men to meet the same physical and mental standards to quality for certain infantry, armor, commando, and other front-line positions across the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Kristen Gelineau, Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia - The last known combat veteran of World War I, Claude Stanley Choules, defied the tolls of time - swimming in the sea as a centenarian and publishing his first book at 108. And despite the fame his military service (and longevity) brought him, Mr. Choules later in life became a pacifist, boycotting parades that he felt glorified war. Mr. Choules, a man of humble spirit and wry humor, died in a Western Australia nursing home Thursday at age 110. Although his accomplishments were many - including a 41-year military career that spanned two navies and two World Wars - the man known as "Chuckles" to his comrades in the Australian navy was happiest being known as a family man. "We all loved him," his 84-year-old daughter, Daphne Edinger, said.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
On a recent morning in Cherry Hill, the biggest threat to personal safety seemed to be sun glare. But inside a former warehouse renovated to look more like a gym, about a dozen men and women were training as if their lives depended on it. Literally. They were learning how to spin out of a choke hold, overpower a carjacker, and punch a gun or knife out of an attacker's hands. An unusual fitness trend, for sure - one with Israeli roots and where motivation comes from a sense of insecurity rather than concern over love handles or jiggly thighs.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The road from Baghdad to Fallujah was a deadly gauntlet when Army First Lt. Viviene McNamara made the run in April 2004 and came upon an abandoned civilian convoy. Its trucks had been raked by insurgent gunfire, one driver was slumped in the cab dead, and the rest had fled. The 12 heavy-equipment transporters in McNamara's platoon became the new targets. A Marine in the group's security detail was soon hit while others ducked. McNamara returned fire from the cover of a truck.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAROLD J. COMFORT was accomplished as a city official and an Army combat veteran of Vietnam, but a lot of people might remember him for the Lola Falana incident. Falana, the Philadelphia-raised actress, dancer and singer, was in her hometown in July 1987 for a declaration by then-Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. creating "Lola Falana Day. " Comfort, who was the recreation commissioner, hit on the idea of fulfilling what he called one of the mayor's "wildest fantasies" by getting Lola to plant a kiss on Goode's cheek.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Milton Becket, 92, of Berwyn, a lawyer and decorated World War II Army veteran, died Tuesday, Feb. 2, of congestive heart failure at home. Known as "Mickey," Mr. Becket was born in Philadelphia to William and Anna Becket. At various times, he also lived in Pittsburgh, and New York City, but he had made Berwyn his home since 1988. He graduated from Central High School, Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Law. Mr. Becket was assigned to Company A of the 179th Infantry Regiment, the 45th Infantry Division, known as the Thunderbirds.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The images made conservative politicians and vocal feminists wince: Mothers in combat fatigues kissing their babies goodbye. Cheery-looking Melissa Rathbun-Neely becoming America's first female prisoner of war since World War II. A female pilot, who revels in her role of delivering troops deep into Iraq, dying when her helicopter crashes in non-hostile action. (Five other women were killed in action during the Persian Gulf conflict.) As Operation Desert Shield built up and Desert Storm burst forth, senators and late-night talk show hosts debated the implications of our mothers, daughters, wives and sisters in the military - particularly since there was no line in the sand separating combat from non-combat jobs.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I am a divorcee with college-age children. Two years after my divorce, I started a relationship with a man; we have been dating for six years. I do not love him. He, however, professes to adore me. I do not want this to go on any longer. I have some serious health issues and I'm not interested in having him as my caretaker. He's a good man. He deserves someone who wants the devotion he is so willing to give. How do I tell him to move on? - Dragging My Feet in Texas DEAR DRAGGING YOUR FEET: The longer you put this off, the harder it will be. The magic words are: "I have enjoyed your friendship, but I'm not in love with you. I had hoped that as time passed I would fall in love with you, but it hasn't happened.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll During summers at our house on the coast of Maine, I occasionally drift into thinking about something thematic in my life, and this summer that turned out to be gratitude. For me, this gratitude has a double life. The first is from my 1925 birth until Dec. 15, 1944. The second is from Dec. 16, 1944, until the current moment of this, my 91st year. That initial span of gratitude is rooted in my ever-loving family of great-hearted parents, an older brother and two younger sisters, and so much of value they contributed to my growth every day of that life.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | Diane Robinson, FOR THE INQUIRER
Q: How can I avoid getting a yeast infection when I have to take antibiotics? A: Most women will experience a yeast infection at some point in their lives. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 75 percent of all adult women have had at least one such infection. A healthy vagina is naturally acidic and contains helpful bacteria to fend off infections and maintain a normal pH level. Oftentimes, taking an antibiotic can interfere with this normal balance.
NEWS
May 31, 2016
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll As Memorial Day has evolved since the Civil War, our nation celebrates it to remember and honor those who died while serving in the armed forces. At the national level, the service itself is more important than the cause. It doesn't matter if the sacrifices were made during World Wars I and II, in Korea and Vietnam, or in Iraq and Afghanistan. Whenever and wherever those deaths occurred, they offer a unifying theme of the spirit: Honor those whose service cost their lives.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
For Tom Manion, a retired Marine Corps colonel and Johnson & Johnson executive, Memorial Day is more than just a holiday to remember veterans who didn't make it home. It's yet another day that he thinks of his only son, First Lt. Travis Manion, who was killed in action in 2007. Telling Travis' story - and those of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan - is the focus of what Tom Manion calls his "third chapter. " Travis Manion was raised in Doylestown, graduated from La Salle College High School and the U.S. Naval Academy, and entered the Marine Corps.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
By Dan Sullivan When the president is in open disagreement with the secretary of defense and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on one of the most critical issues our nation faces - whether to send our sons and daughters into combat - it should be cause for significant national concern. President Obama has repeatedly told the American people that U.S. troops are not in combat in the Middle East. In 2010, he announced that "our combat mission is ending" in Iraq. He used the same words in 2014 regarding Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Kenney's plan critical to combat poverty City Council President Darrell L. Clarke says a proposed 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-beverage tax is too high ("Clarke: Drink tax may be high," Friday). The headline ought to have read: Illiteracy is too high; obesity rate is too high; high school dropout rate is too high; number of crumbling recreation centers is too high; number of decrepit libraries is too high; number of pre-K children without a classroom is too high. Mayor Kenney's Rebuilding Community Infrastructure initiative would begin the process of transforming Philadelphia from the poorest large city in America into the most successful large city in America.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - For the second consecutive fiscal year, the Christie administration and the Legislature's chief budget officer offered similar revenue projections, portending a smooth budget process even as the governor and Democrats fight over initiatives like a proposed constitutional amendment to mandate pension funding for public employees. During much of Gov. Christie's tenure, the state's revenue estimates proved to be overly optimistic, leaving the state to scramble near the end of the fiscal year to balance the budget, as required by the New Jersey constitution.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Milton Becket, 92, of Berwyn, a lawyer and decorated World War II Army veteran, died Tuesday, Feb. 2, of congestive heart failure at home. Known as "Mickey," Mr. Becket was born in Philadelphia to William and Anna Becket. At various times, he also lived in Pittsburgh, and New York City, but he had made Berwyn his home since 1988. He graduated from Central High School, Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Law. Mr. Becket was assigned to Company A of the 179th Infantry Regiment, the 45th Infantry Division, known as the Thunderbirds.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
Pledging to address violence and improve low-achieving schools, State Rep. Thaddeus Kirkland was sworn in Monday as mayor of Chester, one of the region's poorest and most crime-ridden cities. For now, the Democrat said, he will wear two hats - serving as mayor and in the House. Kirkland has rescinded his resignation of his House seat, and said he would remain in the legislature until a budget is passed or until the end of February. He will draw only his state salary, he said. "I am deeply humbled," said the 23-year House veteran, who broke down after taking the oath.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
ISSUE | CIGARETTE TAX An effective tool to combat smoking The commentary attacking cigarette taxes ("Cigarette-tax increases are bad for Pa. business," Wednesday) contained several inaccuracies. Studies have shown that cigarette taxes are an effective strategy for decreasing smoking and reducing smoking-related diseases and deaths. Research also shows that higher tobacco prices help to prevent people, particularly youths, from starting to smoke. While it is true that higher taxes lead some smokers to cross state or county lines for lower prices, most of those who continue smoking neither travel out of state nor seek smugglers to buy cigarettes.
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