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BUSINESS
April 19, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
It was supposed to be open by now: The second-largest construction project in Pennsylvania state history is State Correctional Institutions Phoenix, rising on former farmland next to the 87-year-old SCI Graterford prison in Montgomery County. Only the $800 million Convention Center in Philadelphia cost taxpayers more. Phoenix is a million-square-foot complex, about as big as the Comcast Center, the state's tallest office tower. It is designed to house 3,872 inmates, a few hundred more than now live at Graterford, the main state prison for the Philadelphia area.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Children have a playdate with the Sprout Network Saturday for the Super WHY Celebration at the Market & Shops at Comcast Center. Activities include storytime, and children can watch the network's favorite Super WHY episodes. There will be a meet and greet with Super WHY and Princess Presto and photo opportunities. Market merchants will have arts and crafts, kid-friendly lunch specials, an interactive gaming station, and more. Playdate is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.   KidsinCenterCity.com playdate with Sprout: The Super WHY Celebration, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday on the lower level of the Market & Shops at Comcast Center, 1701 JFK Blvd.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
Internet freedom activists are holding a rally Monday outside the Comcast Center in Philadelphia to protest Comcast's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. The rally, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at 1701 John F. Kennedy Blvd, is organized by Free Press, a nonpartisan group that advocates to preserve open Internet communication and free speech. The group is demanding protections for net neutrality, and the rally will urge the Federal Communications Commission to adopt rules that prevent broadband providers like Comcast and Verizon from discriminating against online content and services.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Growing up in Marietta, Ga., Keesha Boyd watched A Different World - a late 1980s spin-off of The Cosby Show - with her mother on Thursday nights and imagined herself through the black cast of young men and women. She connected with Kim, played by actress Charnele Brown, as a kindred soul. "She was your type-A and studied a lot and was focused on being a premed student," Boyd said. "When you can see something, you can believe it's possible. " Last month, Boyd's vision for giving black viewers a black-centric TV service - about 2,000 hours of curated TV shows and movies with black casts, directors, and themes - launched on Comcast's Xfinity on-demand platform.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
As his own father, Ralph Roberts, aged into his 80s and 90s, Comcast Corp. chief executive Brian Roberts said, he found that he and Flyers owner Ed Snider regularly grabbed lunch around town - the Capital Grille on Chestnut, Table 31 in the Comcast Center, and, more recently, the Union League on Broad. They'd talk sports, media, and life. Roberts, who heads the city's largest publicly traded company, said he trusted Snider as a mentor. "I came to realize his genius," Roberts said.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. said Monday that it had acquired the Philadelphia real-time sports-information service OneTwoSee that tech guys Chris Reynolds and Jason Angelides launched out of a rowhouse at 20th and Brandywine Streets five years ago. OneTwoSee's insight has been to apply real-time auto traffic analytics seen on TV news to sports, tracking game momentum and player statistics with easy-to-read graphics. The company, in effect, has brought big data together with multibillion-dollar TV sports.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six years after Comcast Corp. moved into the city's tallest building, the cable-TV and Internet giant expects to break ground this summer on an even taller, more dazzling, $1.2 billion tower. The 1,121-foot-tall high-rise will be built on Arch Street between 18th and 19th Streets in Center City, adjacent to the current tower, company officials said. One of the world's leading architects, Britain's Norman Foster, has designed the trophy building with a host of innovative features.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, Comcast Corp. and Liberty Property Trust acknowledged Tuesday they were partnering on a third real estate deal in Center City, which some have speculated could be the site of another Comcast office tower. The companies have jointly bought land at 19th and Arch Streets, diagonally across the street from where they are building the 59-story Comcast Innovation and Technology Center, company spokesman John Demming said. Comcast and Liberty have no specific plans for the parcels, as the companies concentrate on developing the new tower, Demming said.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
A South Korean fund is buying the former postal building near 30th Street Station that houses the IRS's local offices, as the Asian country's investors increasingly tap U.S. real estate for stable returns. The fund, managed by Seoul-based Korea Investment Management Co., is under contract to buy the 862,700-square-foot building now known as Cira Square from Brandywine Realty Trust for $354 million, Brandywine CEO Jerry Sweeney said Wednesday. It's the latest acquisition by South Korean fund managers drawn to U.S. office buildings occupied by government or investment-grade tenants with plenty of time left on their leases, said Lucy Fletcher, a managing director at real estate services firm JLL. Such assets appeal to Korean managers, who generally target a steady return of about 6 percent to satisfy the pension and insurance funds they serve back home, said Fletcher, who directs JLL's international capital group in Chicago.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The conference calls begin at 9 a.m. sharp each Monday on the 22d floor of the Comcast Center. There was Charlie Herrin, the head of customer experience in jeans and a blazer, at the table leading the call of about 30 executives and managers, seeking to ease customers' frustrations. This was the new base for a reimagined Comcast, one in which its millions of subscribers are happy and the company anticipates problems before they go viral. First up last Monday was a discussion of Comcast bills.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2016
By Carl Dranoff Philadelphia has gained its rightful place as a national model of urban renewal, and the proof is all around us. It is in our skyline punctuated by Liberty Place and the Comcast Center. It's along corridors such as the Avenue of the Arts, one of the most successful catalysts for economic growth in the United States. It winds through the Schuylkill River Trail, voted the best urban trail in America. And it's in the $6.7 billion of new development underway throughout the city.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
It was supposed to be open by now: The second-largest construction project in Pennsylvania state history is State Correctional Institutions Phoenix, rising on former farmland next to the 87-year-old SCI Graterford prison in Montgomery County. Only the $800 million Convention Center in Philadelphia cost taxpayers more. Phoenix is a million-square-foot complex, about as big as the Comcast Center, the state's tallest office tower. It is designed to house 3,872 inmates, a few hundred more than now live at Graterford, the main state prison for the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
As his own father, Ralph Roberts, aged into his 80s and 90s, Comcast Corp. chief executive Brian Roberts said, he found that he and Flyers owner Ed Snider regularly grabbed lunch around town - the Capital Grille on Chestnut, Table 31 in the Comcast Center, and, more recently, the Union League on Broad. They'd talk sports, media, and life. Roberts, who heads the city's largest publicly traded company, said he trusted Snider as a mentor. "I came to realize his genius," Roberts said.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Growing up in Marietta, Ga., Keesha Boyd watched A Different World - a late 1980s spin-off of The Cosby Show - with her mother on Thursday nights and imagined herself through the black cast of young men and women. She connected with Kim, played by actress Charnele Brown, as a kindred soul. "She was your type-A and studied a lot and was focused on being a premed student," Boyd said. "When you can see something, you can believe it's possible. " Last month, Boyd's vision for giving black viewers a black-centric TV service - about 2,000 hours of curated TV shows and movies with black casts, directors, and themes - launched on Comcast's Xfinity on-demand platform.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. said Monday that it had acquired the Philadelphia real-time sports-information service OneTwoSee that tech guys Chris Reynolds and Jason Angelides launched out of a rowhouse at 20th and Brandywine Streets five years ago. OneTwoSee's insight has been to apply real-time auto traffic analytics seen on TV news to sports, tracking game momentum and player statistics with easy-to-read graphics. The company, in effect, has brought big data together with multibillion-dollar TV sports.
NEWS
January 27, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Withhold taxes It has been nearly seven months since Pennsylvania's government failed in its basic responsibility to pass a budget. This inaction has consequences: Many nonprofits, school districts, and others in the state are hurting from the lack of funding. As Pennsylvania citizens, we don't have to facilitate this. We have the means to effectively pressure our elected officials to get this task done. I urge all state residents - regardless of political affiliation - and businesses to suspend sending their state taxes to Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
A South Korean fund is buying the former postal building near 30th Street Station that houses the IRS's local offices, as the Asian country's investors increasingly tap U.S. real estate for stable returns. The fund, managed by Seoul-based Korea Investment Management Co., is under contract to buy the 862,700-square-foot building now known as Cira Square from Brandywine Realty Trust for $354 million, Brandywine CEO Jerry Sweeney said Wednesday. It's the latest acquisition by South Korean fund managers drawn to U.S. office buildings occupied by government or investment-grade tenants with plenty of time left on their leases, said Lucy Fletcher, a managing director at real estate services firm JLL. Such assets appeal to Korean managers, who generally target a steady return of about 6 percent to satisfy the pension and insurance funds they serve back home, said Fletcher, who directs JLL's international capital group in Chicago.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Philadelphia may be a blue city in a blue state, but Republican Jeb Bush was scooping up some green for his presidential candidacy here Thursday evening. He spent some private time with leading GOP donors at the Comcast Center, because fund-raising never stops, even if, like Bush, you are working hard on the trail to reset your campaign. Bush, once the front-runner for the nomination, has tumbled in the polls, having difficulty gaining traction with a querulous Republican electorate flocking to outsider candidates.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The strike by 65 NBC10 camera operators and broadcast technicians is heating up. NBC10 general manager Ric Harris told employees in an email on Wednesday that Philadelphia's No. 2 local news station is looking to hire replacement workers and that the positions of strikers had been posted on job sites. Harris also emailed that the company's final offer included a "no-layoff guarantee" for the contract that extends to 2018. On Thursday, union spokesman Frank Keel - accompanied by strikers who are members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 - held a news conference in City Hall on the same day that Comcast officials were to meet with city officials over the company's cable-TV franchise renewal.
NEWS
September 29, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, DAVID GAMBACORTA, JULIE SHAW & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A MASSIVE throng of pilgrims who flocked to Philadelphia from across the nation and the world packed every inch of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway yesterday to hear Pope Francis end his historic, sometimes frenetic, U.S. tour with a simple and moving message of love. "Love is shown by little things, by attention to small, daily signs which make us feel at home," the 78-year-old Argentine pontiff said in his native Spanish, delivering a modest yet eloquent homily to a crowd that stretched from the pulpit in front of Eakins Oval toward City Hall, snaking down every side street.
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