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Comcast Spectacor

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BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Spectacor, the South Philadelphia-based arena manager, ticketer and food-services company, said it has changed some of its top managers. Dave Scott was named chief executive officer and president, reporting the company chairman Ed Snider. Scott previously held the titles of chief operating officer and president. Comcast Spectacor also appointed John Page as president of the Wells Fargo Complex and hired Glen Brandeburg for the newly created position of president and chief operating officer of Spectra Venue Management and Food Services & Hospitality.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter A. Luukko, an ally and partner of Flyers founder Ed Snider for more than a quarter-century, resigned as president and chief operating officer at Comcast-Spectacor, a major operator of sports stadiums and owner of the Flyers. The company has 10,100 employees nationwide and the resignation came as a surprise inside the organization and the stadium-management industry. With Luukko's departure, Comcast Corp. - the majority owner of Comcast-Spectacor since the mid-1990s - tightened its grip on the entrepreneurial subsidiary in South Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast-Spectacor, which is jointly owned by Comcast Corp. and businessman Ed Snider, completed its purchase of ticketing-software business Paciolan, the companies said yesterday. The deal was part of an agreement with the Justice Department announced in late January that allowed Ticketmaster Entertainment Inc. to merge with concert promoter Live Nation. As part of the agreement, Live Nation had to sell Paciolan. Terms of the deal with Comcast-Spectacor were not disclosed. "From Day One we will be a big competitor" in the ticket business, Comcast-Spectacor chief executive Peter Luukko said yesterday.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | by Junji Noda, Daily News Sports Writer
Comcast-Spectacor has decided to stretch its boundaries. The Philadelphia-based sports and entertainment firm, which owns the Sixers, Flyers, First Union Center and First Union Spectrum, announced yesterday it has acquired three minor league baseball teams affliated with the Baltimore Orioles from Maryland Baseball, LLC. The Frederick Keys and the Delmarva Shorebirds are Class A affliates of the Orioles. The Bowie Baysox are Baltimore's Double A franchise. All three teams are based in Maryland: the Keys in Frederick, Md.; the Shorebirds in Salisbury; and Baysox in Bowie.
SPORTS
August 24, 2012
The NBA's Sacramento Kings, unhappy with their situation in California, may be headed to Virginia Beach, according to a report in the business journal, Inside Business. Officials from Comcast-Spectacor have proposed moving the team to Virginia Beach and for Comcast to help build and lease a new pro sports arena, according to the report . The Kings have tried but been unsuccessful in building a new arena in Sacramento. How the move would affect scheduling and conference alignment in the NBA is not known.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
The Flyers never have had a problem drawing fans to games. But, just in case, it can't hurt to make sure that interest in ice hockey in the Philadelphia area continues to grow. With that in mind, Comcast-Spectacor, owners of the Flyers, Phantoms, Sixers and First Union Center and Spectrum, officially will open the first of its new Flyers Skate Zone arenas today in Atlantic City. "This is an opportunity to develop fans of the game and ice skating in general," said Pat Ferrill, vice president for rink development and management for Comcast-Spectacor.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast-Spectacor reached an agreement Wednesday to sell the 76ers to a group of investors led by New York billionaire Joshua Harris. The deal, first reported as being in the works just over a month ago, is pending approval by the NBA's board of governors. No difficulties are expected regarding the NBA's approval of the sale. Although terms of the agreement were not disclosed, the deal is for 100 percent of the Sixers for approximately $280 million, possibly slightly more.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly 20 years after casinos arrived in Atlantic City, it appears as though the resort town is about to get something nongamblers can enjoy: a hockey rink. Comcast-Spectacor, in a joint venture with Scarborough Properties, has undertaken a feasibility study to build an ice-skating facility for public use adjacent to the Sandcastle Baseball Stadium in Atlantic City. The firms will have 60 days to complete their study and form an agreement to develop and operate the facility. Scarborough is a commercial real-estate developer based in Gibbsboro.
SPORTS
August 11, 2006 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Comcast-Spectacor truly wants to sell the 76ers, it probably won't have much trouble finding serious buyers. "There are quite a few people in the Philadelphia and New Jersey areas that love basketball and would like to be part of the NBA," said Marc Ganis, president of SportsCorp Ltd., a sports-marketing firm based in Chicago. "There's so much money in that part of the country. " But how much money would a buyer be willing to shell out for the 76ers? Could Comcast-Spectacor break the record of $401 million for an NBA franchise transaction set by the Phoenix Suns and even approach the half-billion dollar figure?
SPORTS
April 26, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Larry Brown became the 76ers coach last May 5, the man with 14 years of NBA experience, with numerous teams, didn't accept the job because of his infatuation with the roster or the club's history. "I took this job because of Pat Croce and Ed Snider," Brown said. "To me, the two go together. Add them up, and they are the Philadelphia 76ers. I can't even imagine life in this organization without them. " Reached last night at his home in Malibu, Calif., Brown had no choice but to wonder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
On Wednesday, ABC sitcom The Goldbergs will pay special tribute to Ed Snider, the Flyers cofounder who passed away last month at the age of 83. The Flyers provided The Goldbergs with rare footage of Snider that will air at the end of Wednesday's episode. "If you love the Flyers, Ed Snider is the Flyers. He's the organization," The Goldbergs creator Adam F. Goldberg said on the phone from Los Angeles. The Flyers and the culture of hockey in Philadelphia are intrinsically woven into the fabric of The Goldbergs , a 1980s-set comedy about a Jenkintown family seen through the eyes of the youngest son. He has a penchant for filmmaking, much like Goldberg, who based the show on his own life.
SPORTS
April 23, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Jay Snider said he and his five siblings have been amazed by the love and support they have received since their father, Ed, died April 11 after a two-year battle with bladder cancer. "It's been overwhelming," Snider, 58, said this week. Ed Snider, 83, was the Flyers' chairman and cofounder. He brought the Flyers to Philadelphia 50 years ago and introduced millions of people to what, at the time, seemed like a foreign sport. They embraced the game and the man who cared about winning more than the fans in the nosebleed seats.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
As his own father, Ralph Roberts, aged into his 80s and 90s, Comcast Corp. chief executive Brian Roberts said, he found that he and Flyers owner Ed Snider regularly grabbed lunch around town - the Capital Grille on Chestnut, Table 31 in the Comcast Center, and, more recently, the Union League on Broad. They'd talk sports, media, and life. Roberts, who heads the city's largest publicly traded company, said he trusted Snider as a mentor. "I came to realize his genius," Roberts said.
SPORTS
April 13, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
PHILADELPHIA lost its most influential sports figure in history with Monday's passing of Flyers co-founder and Comcast Spectacor creator Ed Snider at 83 after a long battle with bladder cancer. The icon was a sports "futurist" who played some kind of role in virtually every major sporting occurrence in Philadelphia over the past five decades. From his bringing the NHL to Philadelphia in 1967 with the expansion Flyers to the birth of the sports television and entertainment entity known as Spectacor in 1974 that grew into Comcast Spectacor to the opening of the state-of-the-art CoreStates Center (now Wells Fargo Center)
SPORTS
April 12, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Ed Snider, 83, the billionaire entrepreneur who co-founded the Flyers and displayed more passion than many fans sitting in the nosebleed seats, died Monday morning after a long battle with bladder cancer. The news was confirmed by the team, which issued a statement written by Mr. Snider's children. "Our Dad was loved and admired for his big heart, generosity of spirit, and dedication to his family," they wrote. "Despite his considerable business achievements and public profile, he was first and foremost a family man. He never missed a birthday, important family event or the opportunity to offer encouragement.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Spectacor, the South Philadelphia-based arena manager, ticketer and food-services company, said it has changed some of its top managers. Dave Scott was named chief executive officer and president, reporting the company chairman Ed Snider. Scott previously held the titles of chief operating officer and president. Comcast Spectacor also appointed John Page as president of the Wells Fargo Complex and hired Glen Brandeburg for the newly created position of president and chief operating officer of Spectra Venue Management and Food Services & Hospitality.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Spectacor CEO Dave Scott says he had a moment of clarity at a dinner with Allentown's Brooks brothers in September. Jim and Rob Brooks, owners of the Lehigh Valley Phantoms minor-league hockey team and operators of the just-opened PPL Center, had contracted with Comcast Spectacor for ticketing, arena management services, and food concessions at the new multipurpose venue - a triple play, to borrow a phrase from the cable industry. Why not market those related Comcast Spectacor services together under one brand, Scott wondered, instead of separately as Ovations food services, Paciolan ticketing, and Global Spectrum venue management?
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph J. Roberts, 95, the soft-spoken visionary who in 1963 bought a tiny subscriber-TV system in Tupelo, Miss., and built it into Comcast Corp., the nation's leading cable company, died Thursday night in Philadelphia. Mr. Roberts, who had been in declining health, died of natural causes. "Ralph has been the heart and soul of Comcast for 50 years," said his son, Comcast president and CEO Brian L. Roberts, in a note to employees Friday morning. "He was the greatest influence in my life and a joy for me to work side by side with for over three decades.
SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Babcock is the only coach to lead teams to hockey's version of the triple crown - titles in the Stanley Cup playoffs, the Olympics, and world championships. And, so, yes, with Babcock's Detroit Red Wings knocked out of the playoffs Wednesday, numerous teams are pursuing a man generally regarded as the league's best coach. Does Ed Snider have a blank check ready? Snider, chairman of the Flyers' parent company, Comcast-Spectacor, said that he didn't want to discuss Babcock or the coaching search, but that he was comfortable with whomever general manager Ron Hextall recommended.
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