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BUSINESS
October 19, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A California man who says he was fired by PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P. after complaining about overcharges on his Comcast Corp. bills filed a federal lawsuit late Thursday against the cable giant for defamation, violating his privacy, and other claims. Conal O'Rourke, 50, is seeking more than $1 million in damages. He claims in the lawsuit that Comcast researched his background and learned of his employment with the accounting and auditing firm after he complained to Comcast officials in Philadelphia about billing irregularities that included $312.50 in overcharges and $2,000 in equipment he had not ordered.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northern California man who says he was fired after Comcast Corp. contacted his employer wants his name cleared and has threatened to file a lawsuit next week against the cable giant, his lawyer, Maureen Pettibone Ryan, said Thursday. The case of Conal O'Rourke, of Santa Clara, is Comcast's latest customer service fiasco to go viral as the nation's largest cable company seeks regulatory approval for its $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. After being unable to resolve a billing problem in California, O'Rourke contacted Comcast's headquarters in Philadelphia twice in February about $312.50 in overcharges, Ryan said in a phone interview.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. shareholders approved on Wednesday the all-stock, $45.2 billion proposed acquisition of beleaguered Time Warner Cable Inc., with 99.6 percent of the votes cast saying the takeover should go through. Based on the deal, Time Warner Cable shareholders would receive 2.875 Comcast shares for each Time Warner Cable share. For example, a Time Warner Cable shareholder with 100 shares would receive 287 Comcast shares. Time Warner Cable shareholders will vote on the plan to merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable companies Thursday morning in New York City.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
In his sparsely decorated office at Comcast Cable Security, Joseph Clancy kept a few well-placed photos on his desk. But rather than pictures of him with world leaders he had encountered, or the presidents he had served, or the first families, the photos were of his own family. Those who have spent time around him say that the array was quintessential Joseph Clancy. "He is not a guy who propels himself into the spotlight," said William Strahan, head of human resources at Comcast.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
If the front office and baseball administration hierarchy of the Phillies organization has any fear of a major upheaval following the team's second straight 73-win season, that fear certainly won't be realized at the hands of acting president Pat Gillick, a baseball lifer so comfortable riding the ebb and flood of the game's tides that he earned the nickname Stand Pat. And as much as fans might hope otherwise, there is also no indication that someone...
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The situation on South Broad Street was potentially volatile. Protesters wanted to deliver thousands of petitions to Comcast Corp. executives and directors after a public meeting at the Kimmel Center in May. They were upset over Comcast's proposed acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. The executives and directors didn't want a confrontation. Standing between the sides was Joseph Clancy, 59, a bald man with ramrod posture in a blue suit, yellow tie, and white shirt, who had guarded President Obama and his family as a member of the Secret Service.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
After an epic breakdown in customer service this summer, Comcast Corp. has appointed a fast-rising executive, Charlie Herrin, to a new position with broad powers to fix Comcast's relationship with its customers. Herrin, 44, ran the team that developed Comcast's interactive X1 TV guide. He now has been named senior vice president of customer experience. Herrin joins Tom Karinshak, senior vice president for customer service, and Patrick O'Hare, senior vice president of field operations, in a sector of Comcast business with more than 50 call centers and tens of thousands of customer service employees and technicians.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You might call it David L. Cohen's Casablanca moment. Like the police captain who announced he was "shocked to find that gambling is going on" in a gaming hall, the Comcast executive suggested to journalists last week that he was shocked that companies wanting stuff from the cable and Internet giant had turned to an unseemly method to get it: using Comcast's proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable as leverage. And if Comcast, as Cohen put it, "declined to play ball"?
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp., seeking to counter sharp opposition from thousands of customers, consumer advocates, and competitors to its proposed $45.2 billion takeover of Time Warner Cable Inc., once again urged the Federal Communications Commission to approve a deal that would cement Comcast's status as the nation's largest cable-TV and broadband Internet provider. In comments submitted late Tuesday to the FCC, Comcast said the acquisition offered a broad range of benefits both to the combined companies' 30-million-plus customers as well as "to individuals, businesses, institutions, and community organizations across the nation," despite criticism from many of the about 65,000 who voiced opinions to the agency before last month's deadline.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fourteen years ago in a prior wave of telecom mergers, Justice Department officials determined that combining two of the nation's largest Internet portals, Excite@Home and Road Runner, posed a "gatekeeper" threat to fledgling Internet-based content companies. For a content company to reach American consumers over the Internet, they would have to go through the Excite@Home or Road Runner portals. This was too much market power concentrated in one company, and the Justice Department forced MediaOne Group Inc. to sell Road Runner before it could be acquired by AT&T.
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