CollectionsComcast
IN THE NEWS

Comcast

BUSINESS
December 14, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia on Friday approved a $50 million settlement that brings a decadelong consumer class-action lawsuit against Comcast Corp. closer to closure. Judge John R. Padova's preliminary decision entitles about 800,000 current and former Comcast cable-TV subscribers in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties and Philadelphia to $15 in credits, or Comcast services valued at $30 to $43.90, according to court documents. Those services include temporary Internet upgrades, six free pay-per-view movies, or two free months of the Movie Channel.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regulators at the Federal Communications Commission have restarted their formal review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. A newly organized group, the Stop Mega Comcast Coalition, used the FCC's action Wednesday to ask the government to reject the proposal. The coalition consists mostly of companies and nonprofits that previously have criticized the deal, which would merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV companies. "Mega Comcast would control an unprecedented 50 percent of the high-speed broadband wires across the country, and would be on a path to virtual dominance of the high-speed broadband market given that the combined company will pass two-thirds of U.S. households," Gene Kimmelman, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit group Public Knowledge, said in a statement Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dish Network, the nation's third-largest pay-TV company, may drop NBCUniversal's regional sports networks in the Chicago, Washington, Sacramento, and San Francisco areas on Dec. 1. The plan seems to be part of a strategy to slim down the bundle of cable channels offered to its TV subscribers, to control price increases. Dish axed the Boston-area regional sports network in August. Comcast Corp. owns NBCUniversal and the Comcast-branded regional sports networks. Regional sports networks can be the second-most-expensive networks in a cable bundle - exceeded only by ESPN - because of the billions of dollars the networks have committed in recent years to acquiring TV rights for professional sports.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xfinity customers in Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania suburbs have had to deal with Comcast Corp.'s conversion to a new billing system along with the recent outage of the X1 set-top box. Comcast officials say the two events - the billing-system conversion for hundreds of thousands of Xfinity customers and the X1 foul-up for a limited number of Xfinity customers - are separate, but they overlapped in parts of the Philadelphia area. Most of the problems are over, the company says.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The buzzer rang Monday on Comcast Corp.'s costly bid to televise Astros baseball and Rockets basketball games in the Houston area. A partnership of DirecTV and AT&T Inc. took possession of CSN Houston's studios near the Toyota Center and laid off 75 of the 141 employees of the bankrupt, Comcast-controlled regional sports network. The legal and financial tussle over the Rockets and Astros games has been watched nationally as evidence of a limit to how much regional sports networks can charge pay-TV distributors.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blind Comcast Corp. TV executive Tom Wlodkowski says the company's talking TV guide for the visually impaired will go live on the nation's largest cable TV system by Dec. 1. The talking guide, still in its beta phase, can be accessed by Xfinity subscribers on the company's X1 set-top boxes. There are five million X1 set-top boxes in American homes, and Comcast is switching out older boxes for X1s throughout its cable TV franchise areas. Of about 22 million Xfinity TV subscribers, 600,000 to 700,000 could be classified as blind or visually impaired, based on national statistics.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decadeslong consolidation of local cable TV firms into a few national networks led by Comcast Corp. has squeezed local outfits that used to wire customers for cable, according to a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court lawsuit by two Pennsylvania firms. Cable Line Inc. and McLaughlin Communications Inc. accuse Comcast Cable Communications of Pennsylvania Inc. of enticing them and other local operators to hire and train workers, add offices, borrow money for trucks and equipment - "only to abandon those firms once they had been induced to create the infrastructure necessary for Comcast's expansion," according to the lawsuit.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greatland Connections Inc., the publicly traded company that would inherit 2.5 million cable-TV subscribers disgorged by Comcast Corp., is seeking to trade on the NASDAQ exchange under the ticker "GLCI. " Comcast shareholders would own 67 percent of Greatland. Greatland will only come into existence if the U.S. Justice Department and the Federal Communications Commission approve Comcast's proposed $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable, the nation's second-largest cable company.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking to get ahead of its customer-service problems, Comcast Corp. says it will make returning equipment more convenient for Xfinity subscribers. They now can drop off set-top boxes and modems at United Parcel Service stores for free shipment to Comcast. There are 4,400 UPS stores nationwide. Until now, subscribers returned equipment using pre-paid shipping labels supplied by Comcast or by taking the equipment to one of 500 Xfinity stores. Subscribers face steep fines if they don't return equipment - which they rent from Comcast - when they cancel, change, or upgrade service.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2014 | By David Sell and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Comcast Corp. has agreed to pay $50 million in cash and services to settle a 10-year-old class-action lawsuit that alleged the cable operator overcharged customers in the Philadelphia region, according to court documents. In a filing in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, Comcast said it did not agree with the plaintiffs' assertions of fact and law but would agree to the proposed payments, pending approval by U.S. Judge John R. Padova. Reuters first reported the settlement. The first version of the suit was filed in 2003 by a group of Comcast customers who thought the cable giant was misusing its dominant position in the Philadelphia area and other markets.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|