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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
IN DAVID MAMET'S vastly entertaining comedy "State and Main" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $24.99), new to video this week, a Hollywood film crew arrives at a small Vermont town and proceeds to turn everyone's life upside-down. William H. Macy is splendid as the cool-headed director trying to maintain control of curious onlookers, self-centered stars, ego-bruised writers and acts of God. The end result? Lots of laughs, an acerbic peek inside the moviemaking process, and, finally, a finished film.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
I WANT TO start off by saying that I'm not a Bush basher - he is in fact my 43rd favorite president! I find it ironic that while he is filling coffins today, he's thinking about filling his coffers tomorrow. There should be a law passed, if you voted for W in 2000 and 2004 - and STILL think he is doing a "heck of a job" - you lose your right to vote in 2008. Tom Martin, Haddonfield, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011
THEATER Fresh off a defining performance as Feste in Pig Iron Theatre's spectacular "Twelfth Night," Scott Greer heads to the reliably hilarious 1812 Productions, which kicks off its season with "Mistakes Were Made. " In a role originated last year by the wonderfully wacky Michael Shannon, Greer is Felix Artifex, an off-Broadway producer who is simultaneously trying to mount his first Broadway show (an epic about the French Revolution), reconcile with his estranged wife and avoid charges of foreign sheep-trafficking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2006 | By CYNTHIA LITTLETON The Hollywood Reporter Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray has the day off
Peter Liguori has a message for the town's comedy writers: Think January. The Fox entertainment president and his development staff are in the thick of an unusually aggressive summer hunt for new comedy projects that can be whipped up in time to take advantage of the golden launch platform offered when "American Idol" returns for a sixth edition in January. The network has 10 blind script deals in place and has been actively seeking pitches for new projects, Liguori said. "We have the best time slot on television to launch a show," he said.
NEWS
June 1, 2015
IT'S ALWAYS funny in Philadelphia - and especially so this August when king of comedy Jerry Seinfeld and fresh prince Kevin Hart both perform locally. Seinfeld is at the intimate Borgata Event Center in Atlantic City for two nights, with 2,400 high rollers in attendance per night. Tickets start at $95 (list) and soar into the stratosphere ($700-plus) at reseller sites. White-hot Hart plays the Linc - as in, the football stadium. He's the first comic ever to headline an NFL venue, this one with a 68,000-seat capacity.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Life Is Beautiful" is a genre of one. It is a comedy about the Holocaust - a subject usually approached with the utmost delicacy by filmmakers, mindful of the danger of trivializing or diminishing events that best speak for themselves. Even in today's anything-goes movie climate - when a movie like "Happiness" can deliver a dispassionate portrait of a child molester - when the industry operates without apparent discretion, exploitation of the Holocaust looms as the last inviolable taboo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Always happy to see Andy Griffith, whether as the charismatic demagogue in A Face in the Crowd, the wise county sheriff Andy Taylor in his self-titled TV show, or the crusty septuagenarian in Waitress. So I was looking forward to his role as the grieving widower in the intergenerational comedy Play the Game, in which a grandson (Paul Campbell) teaches Gramps (Griffith) how to score with "chicks. " Alas, the conceit of a double-dating Grandson and Gramps does not produce a great many laughs in this cringeworthy film costarring Doris Roberts and Marla Sokoloff as the comely Granny and Granddaughter in their sights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hollywood would consider Mike Leigh's method of making a movie to be utter madness. But no one can quarrel with results as winning and invigorating as Life Is Sweet. Leigh is an innovator whose system calls for casting a movie before it is written. He gathers his actors and discusses a character in general terms. Then, over months of rehearsals and wrangling, each performer develops his or her part - right down to a detailed life history of the character. Leigh then sits and writes a script.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
David McCallum in the Paper Mill Playhouse production of "Run for Your Wife," a comedy by Ray Cooney. Directed by Chris Johnston, set by Michael Anania, lighting by David Kissel, costumes by Alice S. Hughes. Presented at the Playhouse Theatre in the Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, through Feb. 22. The humorous possibilities, if any, in the practice of bigamy have been sectioned by writers of comedy since time immemorial, and notably in the films "The Captain's Paradise" and "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker," but with the British import that opened last night in Wilmington I think that this long and desperate pursuit has reached the end of the line with a vast echoey clang.
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NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
OH, LIBERAL Hollywood, there you go again. Will Ferrell, who's become a star playing a variety of lunkheads, is sure to anger a portion of the population having signed on to play President Ronald Reagan in the simply titled movie comedy "Reagan. " Variety reports that the fictional script by Mike Rosolio was on the infamous Hollywood Black List of the best unproduced scripts. It deals with Reagan's second term when he begins to suffer from dementia. An intern must then convince the leader of the free world that he's an actor playing a president.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Comedian W. Kamau Bell had long wondered - from a safe distance - about the Ku Klux Klan, but it took his new CNN show, United Shades of America, which premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday, to get him invited to a cross-burning. Bell, who's based in Berkeley, Calif., lived in Philadelphia as a student - he dropped out of Penn in his sophomore year - and he was back in town this month to promote his series-opening KKK episode. He spoke with Ellen Gray about the Klan and about a couple of other forthcoming episodes: one about policing that was filmed in Philadelphia and Camden, and one about rehabilitation at San Quentin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016 | By Nick Vadala, Staff Writer
By his own admission, Jim Norton has a hard time meeting folks who share his interests. But when those interests include illicit massage parlors, urolagnia, and transgender prostitutes, maybe some difficulty is to be expected. "It's very common to not have the same interests as Jim Norton," the stand-up comedian said during recent phone interview. "A lot of people don't have the same interests as me. " They do, however, seem to like watching him do stand-up. Norton, a New Jersey native, started as a comic in 1990 and quickly became known for his politically incorrect humor.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
There's a scene in the beginning of Flaked , the new dramedy on Netflix from Arrested Development star Will Arnett and Mark Chappell (the creators behind the cringeworthy yet funny Brit-com The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret ) that immediately turned me off. I kept watching the show, but only out of love for you, dear reader. Arnett's Chip is in recovery, discussing his mantras and way of life with two beautiful women half his age. So far, the series has shown us that Chip isn't a great guy. He rides a bike because a drunken-driving accident left another person dead.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
WITH HIS funny, sober, nerve-touching Oscar monologue Sunday night, Chris Rock used his strength - exploding hypocrisy and throwing shade on both sides of the racial divide. Rock solidified his grip on the superstar crown previously held by Eddie Murphy, Richard Pryor, and, yes, Bill Cosby as America's favorite African American standup. Chris Rock is the African American King of Comedy. Rock's monologue was widely anticipated, but the brewing race controversy may have kept some viewers away, and Oscar ratings slumped to an eight-year low. Not Chris Rock's fault.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Norristown's Theatre Horizon on Thursday opens Lobby Hero , Kenneth Lonergan's 2001 drama. Director Matthew Decker and cast will be unspooling a provocative comedy of errors embracing hot-button topics (racial profiling, police brutality, gender politics). Lonergan, 53, is the bluntly lyrical author of the Oscar-nominated scripts for 2002's Gangs of New York and 2000's You Can Count on Me (the latter of which he directed), as well the critically acclaimed 1996 Off-Broadway hit This Is Our Youth . In January, Lonergan's newest cinematic effort, Manchester by the Sea , which he wrote and directed, screened at the Sundance Film Festival.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
The Fugitives By Christopher Sorrentino Simon & Schuster. 322 pages. $26. Reviewed by John Domini Early in The Fugitives , Christopher Sorrentino's wild yet subtle new novel, his protagonist, Sandy Mulligan, bad-mouths the film industry. Mulligan, a novelist himself, complains of hitting the Hollywood jackpot only to be ignored. The director shrugs: "It's not a comedy. " A simple yea or nay like that may work in the Dream Factory, but it won't do for The Fugitives . Sorrentino assays a wide range of approaches, pushing envelopes of genre till his fingers poke through.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016
Theater A Moon for the Misbegotten 2 lost souls find solace with one another on a Connecticut farm. Closes 2/7. Walnut Street Theatre - Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St.; 215-574-3550. $30-$35. A Taste of Things To Come New musical about 4 women participating in a baking contest in '50s-era Illinois. Closes 2/21. Bucks County Playhouse, 70 S. Main St., New Hope; 215-862-2121. $30. A Taste of Things To Come New musical about 4 women participating in a baking contest in '50s-era Illinois.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Patrick Rapa, For The Inquirer
If you ask Cameron Esposito, seeing your face on a movie screen isn't nearly as thrilling as seeing your name. The Chicago-born, L.A.-based stand-up comic known for her amicably in-your-face style, personal anecdotes, and swooping "side-mullet" has recently started to diversify. She just got back from the Sundance Film Festival, where two films by young directors - J.D. Dillard's Sleight and Kerem Sanga's First Girl I Loved - featured her in supporting roles. "Because of my stand-up stuff, and how much of my career involves promoting yourself as a brand, I see my face a lot," she said in a recent interview while on the ride home from LAX. "But one thing I haven't seen a bunch is my name on a single title card.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2016
_ THE X-FILES. 8 p.m. Monday, Fox29. I still want to believe. Sunday's post-football premiere of the limited-series reboot may have been far from the best "X-Files" episode ever, but as the show settles into its regular time slot tonight, things are looking up, at least for fans of the long and tortured personal history of Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson). _ LUCIFER. 9 p.m. Monday, Fox29. Unless someone's truly made a deal with the devil, I don't see much of a future for a show in which the Prince of Darkness (Tom Ellis)
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