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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
IN DAVID MAMET'S vastly entertaining comedy "State and Main" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $24.99), new to video this week, a Hollywood film crew arrives at a small Vermont town and proceeds to turn everyone's life upside-down. William H. Macy is splendid as the cool-headed director trying to maintain control of curious onlookers, self-centered stars, ego-bruised writers and acts of God. The end result? Lots of laughs, an acerbic peek inside the moviemaking process, and, finally, a finished film.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
I WANT TO start off by saying that I'm not a Bush basher - he is in fact my 43rd favorite president! I find it ironic that while he is filling coffins today, he's thinking about filling his coffers tomorrow. There should be a law passed, if you voted for W in 2000 and 2004 - and STILL think he is doing a "heck of a job" - you lose your right to vote in 2008. Tom Martin, Haddonfield, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011
THEATER Fresh off a defining performance as Feste in Pig Iron Theatre's spectacular "Twelfth Night," Scott Greer heads to the reliably hilarious 1812 Productions, which kicks off its season with "Mistakes Were Made. " In a role originated last year by the wonderfully wacky Michael Shannon, Greer is Felix Artifex, an off-Broadway producer who is simultaneously trying to mount his first Broadway show (an epic about the French Revolution), reconcile with his estranged wife and avoid charges of foreign sheep-trafficking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2006 | By CYNTHIA LITTLETON The Hollywood Reporter Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray has the day off
Peter Liguori has a message for the town's comedy writers: Think January. The Fox entertainment president and his development staff are in the thick of an unusually aggressive summer hunt for new comedy projects that can be whipped up in time to take advantage of the golden launch platform offered when "American Idol" returns for a sixth edition in January. The network has 10 blind script deals in place and has been actively seeking pitches for new projects, Liguori said. "We have the best time slot on television to launch a show," he said.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Life Is Beautiful" is a genre of one. It is a comedy about the Holocaust - a subject usually approached with the utmost delicacy by filmmakers, mindful of the danger of trivializing or diminishing events that best speak for themselves. Even in today's anything-goes movie climate - when a movie like "Happiness" can deliver a dispassionate portrait of a child molester - when the industry operates without apparent discretion, exploitation of the Holocaust looms as the last inviolable taboo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Always happy to see Andy Griffith, whether as the charismatic demagogue in A Face in the Crowd, the wise county sheriff Andy Taylor in his self-titled TV show, or the crusty septuagenarian in Waitress. So I was looking forward to his role as the grieving widower in the intergenerational comedy Play the Game, in which a grandson (Paul Campbell) teaches Gramps (Griffith) how to score with "chicks. " Alas, the conceit of a double-dating Grandson and Gramps does not produce a great many laughs in this cringeworthy film costarring Doris Roberts and Marla Sokoloff as the comely Granny and Granddaughter in their sights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hollywood would consider Mike Leigh's method of making a movie to be utter madness. But no one can quarrel with results as winning and invigorating as Life Is Sweet. Leigh is an innovator whose system calls for casting a movie before it is written. He gathers his actors and discusses a character in general terms. Then, over months of rehearsals and wrangling, each performer develops his or her part - right down to a detailed life history of the character. Leigh then sits and writes a script.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
David McCallum in the Paper Mill Playhouse production of "Run for Your Wife," a comedy by Ray Cooney. Directed by Chris Johnston, set by Michael Anania, lighting by David Kissel, costumes by Alice S. Hughes. Presented at the Playhouse Theatre in the Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, through Feb. 22. The humorous possibilities, if any, in the practice of bigamy have been sectioned by writers of comedy since time immemorial, and notably in the films "The Captain's Paradise" and "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker," but with the British import that opened last night in Wilmington I think that this long and desperate pursuit has reached the end of the line with a vast echoey clang.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1991 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A comedy with a very familiar - and somewhat puffy - face, and a troubling drama from France are at the top of this week's list of new videos. THE FRESHMAN (1990) (RCA/Columbia) 102 minutes. Marlon Brando, Matthew Broderick, Bruno Kirby, Maxmilian Schell. Andrew Bergman's comedy is a breath of fresh air, and not just because Brando does a hilarious sendup of his Oscar-winning portrait of Vito Corleone in The Godfather. Here he's a Little Italy "importer" whose machinations turn innocent film-school student Broderick into an unwilling godson.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
HAVE YOU ever exited a play thinking, "I would have had a different ending," or, "I thought that character should have made that other choice"? Well, now you have the chance to determine the onstage action. Thursday, Philly's comedy-centric 1812 Productions launches its 18th season with a presentation that pretty much defines the phrase "interactive theater. " "Intimate Exchanges" by Alan Ayckbourn centers on the relationships of four people, a married-12-years couple and a younger man and woman.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE BIG NEWS out of Stu Bykofsky's Candidates Comedy Night last night was the serious news that the amount of money raised in its 24 years has exploded beyond the half-million mark. The exact figure couldn't be computed immediately, but with U.S. Rep. Bob Brady calling out to three donors demanding $500 apiece (and getting it) and an auction of sports memorabilia raking in the bids, the donations rang like a berserk cash register. For instance, an autographed Donovan McNabb jersey, with an autograph that Stu Bykofsky refused to vouch for, went for $1,000.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few months ago, Alina John had no idea what she'd be doing this summer. Now, she's spending a week working alongside Broadway professionals. And it's all thanks to the generosity of a group of Mormons. More accurately, a group of actors who play Mormons. John is one of 180 people participating in an intensive summer workshop at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts taught by the Broadway Dreams Foundation. John, 21, of Burlington County, a recent graduate of the University of the Arts, was given a scholarship from the cast of the national tour of The Book of Mormon that allowed her to attend the workshop for the second summer in a row. On Thursday afternoon, a few days before the weeklong workshop will culminate in a performance, John got a chance to meet Josh Daniel, an actor in the current staging of the nine-time Tony-winning musical at the Forrest Theatre.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"WHAT IF" is "When Harry Met Sally And Dithered. " Daniel Radcliffe is lovelorn single guy Wallace, who meets his soulmate, Chantry (Zoe Kazan) at a party, though she's already deeply attached (to Rafe Spall). They agree to be friends, and we again examine the question of whether a man and a woman can ignore the sparks flying between them and exist as platonic creatures. The answer in "What If" is obviously "no" - every Wallace/Chantry encounter deepens their intimacy and attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* PARTNERS. 9 and 9:30 tonight, FX. TWO DECADES ago, Kelsey Grammer and Martin Lawrence were playing very different broadcast personalities on very different hit shows. Tonight, the stars of "Frasier" and "Martin" join forces in a new FX sitcom, "Partners," as very different Chicago lawyers. "We sat down in a room about two years ago and just fell in love," Grammer said of the otherwise unromantic-sounding process that led them back to TV. "Partners," which shares a name with at least two previous sitcoms, is the latest cable comedy to be sold on the "10/90" model, in which a network orders 10 episodes, whose ratings performance may trigger an order for 90 more, as it did with Charlie Sheen's "Anger Management.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
"THE BIG BANG THEORY" is reportedly the most popular sitcom in the world. Perhaps the solar system. It's been translated into more languages than Sheldon knows and generated enough revenue to launch Howard into space or get Raj a girlfriend. As it is so popular, the actors want to receive just compensation. At the moment the number being bandied about for just compensation is $1 million per episode, per actor (and it's not as if they were making $8 an episode last year)
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
LET'S CUT right to the chase: I am at a loss as to why "The Book of Mormon" is such a box-office phenomenon. The Tony-glomming musical comedy (as it were) from "South Park" creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker finally landed at the Forrest Theatre, where, earlier this week, it launched a seven-week run. It arrived with the kind of buildup one would expect for the Second Coming (an appropriate reference considering the show's religion-based plot). And I just can't fathom the reason for this.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN IT COMES to movies about unplanned pregnancies, ultraliberal Hollywood is surprisingly squeamish on the subject of abortion. The most famous example of this is "Knocked Up," about a gorgeous and with-it single woman who decides to go forward with her one-night-stand pregnancy, even though it means trying to make a suitable mate out of unemployed potbellied pothead pornographer Seth Rogen. Alternatives were not considered. The word abortion was not mentioned - one character describes a procedure to terminate the pregnancy as something that rhymes with "smashmortion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When it comes to the small screen - the really small screens, of computers, tablets, and mobile devices - Philadelphia has a flourishing scene. At a time when Netflix is going strong with Web-only programs such as Orange Is the New Black and House of Cards , Philadelphia is home to a range of Web-only series, starring or written or produced by Philly folks. Among the local film crews in town, you'll find Lee Porter's My Ruined Life ( MRL ) shooting near a Rittenhouse park bench.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
I WAS LOOKING for a moniker to hang on this November's election. We've had the Year of the Woman, the Tea Party Revolt, the Year of the Minority, the Year of the Older White Man. (Oh! That's every year. Sorry.) I wanted a catchphrase as I announce the 24th annual Stu Bykofsky Candidates Comedy Night, which will be held Thursday, Aug. 14, at its longtime home, Finnigan's Wake, 3rd and Spring Garden streets. This year Pennsylvanians will elect a governor, and across the commonwealth (and elsewhere)
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