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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
IN DAVID MAMET'S vastly entertaining comedy "State and Main" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $24.99), new to video this week, a Hollywood film crew arrives at a small Vermont town and proceeds to turn everyone's life upside-down. William H. Macy is splendid as the cool-headed director trying to maintain control of curious onlookers, self-centered stars, ego-bruised writers and acts of God. The end result? Lots of laughs, an acerbic peek inside the moviemaking process, and, finally, a finished film.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
I WANT TO start off by saying that I'm not a Bush basher - he is in fact my 43rd favorite president! I find it ironic that while he is filling coffins today, he's thinking about filling his coffers tomorrow. There should be a law passed, if you voted for W in 2000 and 2004 - and STILL think he is doing a "heck of a job" - you lose your right to vote in 2008. Tom Martin, Haddonfield, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011
THEATER Fresh off a defining performance as Feste in Pig Iron Theatre's spectacular "Twelfth Night," Scott Greer heads to the reliably hilarious 1812 Productions, which kicks off its season with "Mistakes Were Made. " In a role originated last year by the wonderfully wacky Michael Shannon, Greer is Felix Artifex, an off-Broadway producer who is simultaneously trying to mount his first Broadway show (an epic about the French Revolution), reconcile with his estranged wife and avoid charges of foreign sheep-trafficking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2006 | By CYNTHIA LITTLETON The Hollywood Reporter Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray has the day off
Peter Liguori has a message for the town's comedy writers: Think January. The Fox entertainment president and his development staff are in the thick of an unusually aggressive summer hunt for new comedy projects that can be whipped up in time to take advantage of the golden launch platform offered when "American Idol" returns for a sixth edition in January. The network has 10 blind script deals in place and has been actively seeking pitches for new projects, Liguori said. "We have the best time slot on television to launch a show," he said.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Life Is Beautiful" is a genre of one. It is a comedy about the Holocaust - a subject usually approached with the utmost delicacy by filmmakers, mindful of the danger of trivializing or diminishing events that best speak for themselves. Even in today's anything-goes movie climate - when a movie like "Happiness" can deliver a dispassionate portrait of a child molester - when the industry operates without apparent discretion, exploitation of the Holocaust looms as the last inviolable taboo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Always happy to see Andy Griffith, whether as the charismatic demagogue in A Face in the Crowd, the wise county sheriff Andy Taylor in his self-titled TV show, or the crusty septuagenarian in Waitress. So I was looking forward to his role as the grieving widower in the intergenerational comedy Play the Game, in which a grandson (Paul Campbell) teaches Gramps (Griffith) how to score with "chicks. " Alas, the conceit of a double-dating Grandson and Gramps does not produce a great many laughs in this cringeworthy film costarring Doris Roberts and Marla Sokoloff as the comely Granny and Granddaughter in their sights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hollywood would consider Mike Leigh's method of making a movie to be utter madness. But no one can quarrel with results as winning and invigorating as Life Is Sweet. Leigh is an innovator whose system calls for casting a movie before it is written. He gathers his actors and discusses a character in general terms. Then, over months of rehearsals and wrangling, each performer develops his or her part - right down to a detailed life history of the character. Leigh then sits and writes a script.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
David McCallum in the Paper Mill Playhouse production of "Run for Your Wife," a comedy by Ray Cooney. Directed by Chris Johnston, set by Michael Anania, lighting by David Kissel, costumes by Alice S. Hughes. Presented at the Playhouse Theatre in the Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, through Feb. 22. The humorous possibilities, if any, in the practice of bigamy have been sectioned by writers of comedy since time immemorial, and notably in the films "The Captain's Paradise" and "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker," but with the British import that opened last night in Wilmington I think that this long and desperate pursuit has reached the end of the line with a vast echoey clang.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The romantic comedy is turned on its head in Obvious Child , a hilarious and controversial comedy about true love, one-night stands, and abortion. A cross between a Woody Allen farce and a particularly filthy one-woman show by Sarah Silverman, the film features an incredible turn by Saturday Night Live alumna Jenny Slate. She stars as Donna, a stand-up comic approaching 30 who discovers her boyfriend and her galpal have been having an affair for months. Feeling ugly and unlovable, Donna gets carried away one night and has a drunken one-night stand with Max, a sweet graduate student ( The Office 's Jake Lacy)
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NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Television has a grand tradition of putting fully formed female friendships onscreen, from Lucy and Ethel to Mary and Rhoda to Broad City 's Abbi and Ilana. These relationships can be deep, complex, and - in the case of Broad City - pretty stoned. These relationships are the great love stories of television. Monica of Friends married Chandler - but only with Rachel and Phoebe would she sit despondently in a wedding dress swigging beers. Netflix's Grace and Frankie gets that right, sometimes - and when it does, it's a lovely, if traditional, comedy about two women learning how to fall (platonically)
NEWS
May 1, 2015
THE MORAL of "Kinky Boots"? That's an easy one: There's no business like shoe business. But (bad) puns aside, it's easy to see why 2013 Tony Awards voters bestowed six statues - including the coveted Best Musical - upon the show based on a relatively obscure 2005 British film which, in turn, was inspired by the true story of a failing shoe manufacturer whose fortunes were reversed by its entry into the fetish-wear industry. The stage version, which runs through May 10 at the Forrest Theatre, is a real charmer, blessed with an interesting, easy-to-follow plot, empathetic characters, a tuneful, eclectic score, enough genuinely funny lines to keep the laughs coming on a regular basis and an infectious energy that never flags.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's nothing like watching the Geico Gecko spew a filthy barrage of obscenities and invectives, then get the stuffing kicked out of him by an enraged Steve Coogan. It's one of the many pleasures Happyish , which will premiere at 9:30 p.m. Sunday on Showtime. It's an intelligent, surreal, mildly outrageous - and most certainly outraged - satire of life in post-industrial America. Created and written by novelist and essayist Shalom Auslander ( Foreskin's Lament: A Memoir )
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'One of these days, Alice, straight to the moon!" That clenched-fist line, immortalized by Jackie Gleason playing Ralph Kramden on The Honeymooners , supplies the title for Jennifer Childs' new play, To the Moon , now in previews by 1812 Productions at Christ Church Neighborhood House. For people too young to have watched this vintage sitcom series, The Honeymooners featured two working-class couples in a Brooklyn apartment building (this was in the 1950s, long before Brooklyn became the pricey hipster paradise it is now)
NEWS
April 10, 2015
YOU MAY be aware that a musical stage version of "The Honeymooners" is headed to Broadway. But long before that production sees the light of day, Philly will welcome the world premiere of its own " 'Mooners"-based play. 1812 Productions raises the curtain Thursday on "To The Moon," which is billed as "a contemporary comedy inspired by the life and work of Jackie Gleason . " The piece, penned by local comedy doyenne Jen Childs , involves an actor - played by Childs' hubby, Barrymore winner Scott Greer - who decides to model his career after that of Gleason, who died in 1987.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT. Friday, Netflix. * DIG. 10 tonight, USA.   FROM "That Girl" to "Girls," single women hoping to make it in the Big Apple aren't new to TV. Single women moving to New York after 15 years living underground in a doomsday cult? You can count them on one finger. There's nothing generic about the funny (and charming) "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," whose first 13 episodes premiere tomorrow on Netflix. Ellie Kemper ("The Office") stars as Kimmy, who's been through some stuff and emerged determined not to waste her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The name Margaret Cho instantly brings to mind hot-button political activism and outrageous first-person humor, things you'll find in equal measure during her shows at Helium Comedy Club on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Whether as comedian, actress or author, Cho covers racism, feminism, abuse, LGBT empowerment, sexual liberation, corporate interference, bullying, and more. Her current stage show is titled "There's No 'I' in Team, but there is a 'Cho' in Psycho". She also has had a late-night talk show, All About Sex , which recently completed its first six-episode season on TLC, and documentaries such as Adventures in Comedy . Cho, 42, is still as passionate about stand-up comedy as she was when she first gained national attention in the early '90s for her frank takes on being young, bold, and Korean American.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Too many theatergoers, artists and critics operate under the idea that theater should provide social commentary, challenge orthodoxy, or motivate political change, with audience enjoyment a secondary (at best) concern. Paul Slade Smith's hysterical, albeit mindless, Unnecessary Farce exploded this mistaken belief one recent evening at Ambler's Act II Playhouse, as the audience roared throughout the 100-minute, two-act international hit. Smith has written a doozy of a door-slamming, mistaken-identity plot-shuffler.
NEWS
February 2, 2015
The wind is howling, but inside this coffeehouse on Christian Street, it's cozy, all the windows opaque with steam. One by one, the patrons - millennials who have staked out their tables with laptops - approach Abbi Jacobson to gush about how much they love her show, Broad City . "It's usually not like this," says the Main Line native, flustered by the processional. "Most places, I'm not recognized at all. " She'd better get used to the attention. Her anarchic Comedy Central series with Ilana Glazer is rapidly transitioning from cult favorite to prime-time sensation.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - Growing up in Huntingdon Valley in the 1980s, Benson Lee loved the teen comedies of that spirited time, especially John Hughes classics like The Breakfast Club and Sixteen Candles . The music, the style, the "youthful attitude" - those films were, he says, "such a great escape for me. " There was just one problem. Lee, a second-generation Korean American, "hated the depiction of Asian characters," like Sixteen Candles' Long Duk Dong, a buffoonish exchange student whose appearances were introduced with ringing gongs.
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