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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The romantic comedy is turned on its head in Obvious Child , a hilarious and controversial comedy about true love, one-night stands, and abortion. A cross between a Woody Allen farce and a particularly filthy one-woman show by Sarah Silverman, the film features an incredible turn by Saturday Night Live alumna Jenny Slate. She stars as Donna, a stand-up comic approaching 30 who discovers her boyfriend and her galpal have been having an affair for months. Feeling ugly and unlovable, Donna gets carried away one night and has a drunken one-night stand with Max, a sweet graduate student ( The Office 's Jake Lacy)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
IN DAVID MAMET'S vastly entertaining comedy "State and Main" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $24.99), new to video this week, a Hollywood film crew arrives at a small Vermont town and proceeds to turn everyone's life upside-down. William H. Macy is splendid as the cool-headed director trying to maintain control of curious onlookers, self-centered stars, ego-bruised writers and acts of God. The end result? Lots of laughs, an acerbic peek inside the moviemaking process, and, finally, a finished film.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
I WANT TO start off by saying that I'm not a Bush basher - he is in fact my 43rd favorite president! I find it ironic that while he is filling coffins today, he's thinking about filling his coffers tomorrow. There should be a law passed, if you voted for W in 2000 and 2004 - and STILL think he is doing a "heck of a job" - you lose your right to vote in 2008. Tom Martin, Haddonfield, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011
THEATER Fresh off a defining performance as Feste in Pig Iron Theatre's spectacular "Twelfth Night," Scott Greer heads to the reliably hilarious 1812 Productions, which kicks off its season with "Mistakes Were Made. " In a role originated last year by the wonderfully wacky Michael Shannon, Greer is Felix Artifex, an off-Broadway producer who is simultaneously trying to mount his first Broadway show (an epic about the French Revolution), reconcile with his estranged wife and avoid charges of foreign sheep-trafficking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2006 | By CYNTHIA LITTLETON The Hollywood Reporter Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray has the day off
Peter Liguori has a message for the town's comedy writers: Think January. The Fox entertainment president and his development staff are in the thick of an unusually aggressive summer hunt for new comedy projects that can be whipped up in time to take advantage of the golden launch platform offered when "American Idol" returns for a sixth edition in January. The network has 10 blind script deals in place and has been actively seeking pitches for new projects, Liguori said. "We have the best time slot on television to launch a show," he said.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Life Is Beautiful" is a genre of one. It is a comedy about the Holocaust - a subject usually approached with the utmost delicacy by filmmakers, mindful of the danger of trivializing or diminishing events that best speak for themselves. Even in today's anything-goes movie climate - when a movie like "Happiness" can deliver a dispassionate portrait of a child molester - when the industry operates without apparent discretion, exploitation of the Holocaust looms as the last inviolable taboo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Always happy to see Andy Griffith, whether as the charismatic demagogue in A Face in the Crowd, the wise county sheriff Andy Taylor in his self-titled TV show, or the crusty septuagenarian in Waitress. So I was looking forward to his role as the grieving widower in the intergenerational comedy Play the Game, in which a grandson (Paul Campbell) teaches Gramps (Griffith) how to score with "chicks. " Alas, the conceit of a double-dating Grandson and Gramps does not produce a great many laughs in this cringeworthy film costarring Doris Roberts and Marla Sokoloff as the comely Granny and Granddaughter in their sights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hollywood would consider Mike Leigh's method of making a movie to be utter madness. But no one can quarrel with results as winning and invigorating as Life Is Sweet. Leigh is an innovator whose system calls for casting a movie before it is written. He gathers his actors and discusses a character in general terms. Then, over months of rehearsals and wrangling, each performer develops his or her part - right down to a detailed life history of the character. Leigh then sits and writes a script.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
David McCallum in the Paper Mill Playhouse production of "Run for Your Wife," a comedy by Ray Cooney. Directed by Chris Johnston, set by Michael Anania, lighting by David Kissel, costumes by Alice S. Hughes. Presented at the Playhouse Theatre in the Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, through Feb. 22. The humorous possibilities, if any, in the practice of bigamy have been sectioned by writers of comedy since time immemorial, and notably in the films "The Captain's Paradise" and "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker," but with the British import that opened last night in Wilmington I think that this long and desperate pursuit has reached the end of the line with a vast echoey clang.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The romantic comedy is turned on its head in Obvious Child , a hilarious and controversial comedy about true love, one-night stands, and abortion. A cross between a Woody Allen farce and a particularly filthy one-woman show by Sarah Silverman, the film features an incredible turn by Saturday Night Live alumna Jenny Slate. She stars as Donna, a stand-up comic approaching 30 who discovers her boyfriend and her galpal have been having an affair for months. Feeling ugly and unlovable, Donna gets carried away one night and has a drunken one-night stand with Max, a sweet graduate student ( The Office 's Jake Lacy)
NEWS
October 10, 2014
TO A LARGE degree, the story of modern-day comedy has been written primarily in a handful of towns. New York and Los Angeles, obviously, are among them, but two others are just as important: Chicago and Toronto. Both are permanent residences of Second City, the groundbreaking improvisational-comedy troupe that has been the training ground for a mind-boggling number of comedy megastars from Joan Rivers and Robert Klein to John Belushi and Gilda Radner , from Martin Short and Catherine O'Hara to Tina Fey and three current "Saturday Night Live" cast members.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WITH ALL the bad news coming from Atlantic City, there isn't much to laugh at down there these days, right? But the truth is, AC is a pretty hilarious place. In fact, Atlantic City could call itself the funniest burg on the East Coast. Not that this is anything new. After all, AC is where an aspiring comic-juggler named W.C. Fields honed his craft at the turn of the 20th century. It's where acts like Bud Abbott (an AyCee native) and Lou Costello , and the Three Stooges were regular headliners in their heyday.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | Chuck Darrow
TWO JEWS go on a website . . . That's not a setup for a joke, it's the backstory for "Old Jews Telling Jokes," which on Wednesday tummels its way into the Penn's Landing Playhouse for a seven-week run. "Old Jews" is the off-Broadway smash inspired by the similarly titled, six-year-old website that, as its name (oldjewstellingjokes.com) suggests, is all about humor, much of it with a Yiddishkeit slant. One of the funniest things about the revue is that it was co-created by a man famous for his knowledge and delineation of serious and important topics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In Communicating Doors , Alan Ayckbourn has written an almost director-proof play. At least I would have argued that before seeing the Liam Castellan-helmed production currently at the Hedgerow Theatre. We'll start with the brilliantly constructed plot, a Hitchcock-influenced comic thriller with a time-travel twist. In 2034, dominatrix Poopay (Kyra Baker) goes on call to the luxury hotel room of the wealthy Reese (Shaun Yates). Instead of sex, he wants her to witness his confession to a lifetime of business-related crimes and killings.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Joan Rivers, the transgressive comedian, author, Fashion Police commissioner, filmmaker and QVC pitchwoman, died Thursday. On Aug. 26, the seemingly unstoppable octogenarian was dishing on E!'s Fashion Police about the clothes worn on the red carpet at the Video Music Awards and the Emmy Awards. The next night, she performed her comedy act at a Times Square theater. On Aug. 28, she stopped breathing during outpatient surgery on her vocal cords. Doctors induced a medical coma and put her on life support.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
HAVE YOU ever exited a play thinking, "I would have had a different ending," or, "I thought that character should have made that other choice"? Well, now you have the chance to determine the onstage action. Thursday, Philly's comedy-centric 1812 Productions launches its 18th season with a presentation that pretty much defines the phrase "interactive theater. " "Intimate Exchanges" by Alan Ayckbourn centers on the relationships of four people, a married-12-years couple and a younger man and woman.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE BIG NEWS out of Stu Bykofsky's Candidates Comedy Night last night was the serious news that the amount of money raised in its 24 years has exploded beyond the half-million mark. The exact figure couldn't be computed immediately, but with U.S. Rep. Bob Brady calling out to three donors demanding $500 apiece (and getting it) and an auction of sports memorabilia raking in the bids, the donations rang like a berserk cash register. For instance, an autographed Donovan McNabb jersey, with an autograph that Stu Bykofsky refused to vouch for, went for $1,000.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few months ago, Alina John had no idea what she'd be doing this summer. Now, she's spending a week working alongside Broadway professionals. And it's all thanks to the generosity of a group of Mormons. More accurately, a group of actors who play Mormons. John is one of 180 people participating in an intensive summer workshop at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts taught by the Broadway Dreams Foundation. John, 21, of Burlington County, a recent graduate of the University of the Arts, was given a scholarship from the cast of the national tour of The Book of Mormon that allowed her to attend the workshop for the second summer in a row. On Thursday afternoon, a few days before the weeklong workshop will culminate in a performance, John got a chance to meet Josh Daniel, an actor in the current staging of the nine-time Tony-winning musical at the Forrest Theatre.
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