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Comedy Club

ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011
BRIAN McKIM doesn't profess to be a prophet, but he can claim co-authorship of the Bible. The Pennsauken native and his wife and fellow stand-up comic, Traci Skene, have written The Comedy Bible: The Complete Resource for Aspiring Comedians , which the Barron's imprint will release Oct. 1. According to McKim, who performs today through Thursday at the Comedy Club inside the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa, the book "has elements of a textbook, but...
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Tom Halligan, Special to The Inquirer
Let's face it, Delaware County isn't exactly a hotbed of entertainment. Sure, you can always pop in on a township council meeting for a few belly laughs. Or, you could head over to the mall parking lot to witness quality demolition derby follies. Of course, you can always venture into the city - Eeeekkk! OK, you'd rather venture into downtown Beirut on a holy day. So what's to do locally when politicians and crunched metal just don't tickle your funny bone anymore?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the one hand, there is Howie Mandel, the streetwise, flip, sometimes crude product of the comedy-club circuit. Then there is Mary Wilson, the smooth, sophisticated, sexy performer who graduated (with honors, no doubt) from the University of Motown. Talk about a contrast. No matter. This is the combination that is entertaining patrons in the Copa Room at the Sands Hotel & Casino through Sunday. On the basis of audience reaction at Wednesday night's opening show, it clicks nicely.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His business card says it all: "Dr. Robert A. Alper, Rabbi/Stand-up Comic (Really). " And now, with the recent publication of Life Doesn't Get Any Better Than This: The Holiness of Little Daily Dramas, the rabbi can add the word author. The book combines stories of the two halves of his life - comedy and theology. He calls it "chicken soup with a soul. " But his stage humor is truly stand-up: short jokes, not long stories with a twist. He will never do "Jewish American Princess" jokes or any other low form of ethnic humor, although his Jewishness is a big part of his act. For example: "I get the Jewish Cable News Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
Remember Punchline? The sometimes grim and despairing movie, a tale of a housewife working in a comedy club and finally achieving stardom, could almost be the story of Louise DuArt's life. Almost, but not quite. DuArt, 39, an impressionist making her first headlining appearance, at the Bay Cabaret of Harrah's Marina Hotel Casino, doesn't care for stand-up comedy. It's something she'd rather not do. "When I was a kid, watching The Ed Sullivan Show, I liked the dog acts, loved the jugglers and the singers and everything else, but every time a stand-up comic came on, I'd change the channel," she says.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
If there were a coat-check at the Pink Rose Pastry Shop, customers would hand over their diets and good intentions as soon as they walked through the door. They're of no use once inside. The dessert shop at 4th and Bainbridge streets is a tribute to sweets. Patrons who visit for a little after-dinner-something can find just about anything. The glass display case is a showcase of pies, tarts, cakes, cookies and truffles of every icing, fruit and filling. The names of the desserts are a mouthful.
NEWS
March 2, 1986 | By Robert Brody, Special to The Inquirer
You want funny? New York City's comedy clubs can give you funny. It's no joke. You might even need traction. Oh, sure, you could catch some comedy on TV. But almost all the humor is watered down for Mr. and Mrs. Common Denominator. Plus, you're witnessing only electromagnetic images. You miss out on the smells of live performance. And the comedians cannot hear your laughter - or your heckling. You could always hit Vegas or Atlantic City or the Catskills. You could take in Rickles or Rivers, Shecky or Henny or Buddy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1986 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
Andre Previn conducts the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the final concert of the All Star-Forum series, 8 p.m., at the Academy of Music, Broad and Locust. The program includes Mozart's Piano Concerto in G major, K. 453, with Previn as soloist, and Britten's Spring Symphony, Op. 44. Tickets: $10-$23. Info: 893-1930. GOOD SPORTS The Police Athletic League kicks off its 1986 baseball/softball program when Mayor Goode tosses out the first ball at 4 p.m. ceremonies at Judge Lewis Quadrangle, 6th and Market.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Craig Geyer, owner of Obsessions, a sports bar and restaurant at 2035 Old West Chester Pike, may have learned the hard way never to assume, especially when money is on the line. Geyer took over the former Saw Mill Inn after it folded a couple of years ago, and since October has been operating a nightclub in the basement. It was a legitimate use, he assumed, because a comedy club called Bonkers had previously operated there. It turned out that Geyer had no zoning approval for the use, that his permit only allowed the restaurant and bar, and that even the large display sign on West Chester Pike - first "Bonkers," now "Obsessions" - had no permit on record.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com Staff Writer
Sunday at 9, in the time slot that usually features Once Upon a Time , Disney's ABC will feature one of the few Bachelor or Bachelorette romances that has turned out like a fairy tale. The bride, Ashley Hebert, was a University of Pennsylvania dental student during her gig as Bachelorette No. 7 last year. She currently is a first-year resident in pediatric dentistry at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. The groom was guy who got the final rose that summer - J.P. Rosenbaum, a New York City construction manager.
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