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Comedy

NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLINS, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
WHOOPI GOLDBERG lives on the comedic edge, whether it's on the stage, on set or in her swivel chair on "The View. " She doesn't shy away from the controversial - she welcomes it. Back in 1990, in "Whoopi Goldberg Presents Billy Connolly," Goldberg began a bit by singing, "Where have all the negroes gone?" She urged members of the audience to sing along with her and "follow the bouncing Negro!" Despite early hesitation, they did. "And they said y'all wouldn't do that!" she laughed.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
MARLON Wayans had to make "A Haunted House," his new found-footage - shot as if it were an amateur film - comedy flick, or else he would have been out of a job. "I like to work and there's no movies for actors, period, especially black actors. When white actors are like, 'Man, there's no work out there,' then black actors are like, 'Are you kidding me?'" Wayans said during a recent trip to Philly. Since Wayans moved to L.A., he has fended for himself. "["Boyz in the Hood" director]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
PHILLY HAS never lacked for hilarity. Ben Franklin was internationally funny. Comedy legends like Bill Cosby and Bob Saget were molded in our city. And our sports teams make us laugh - if only to keep from crying. But Philly has never been known for its comedy scene the way Chicago, Boston or Austin have. But that's changing, as evidenced by the WitOut Awards for Philadelphia Comedy. Comedy blog WitOut.net will host its second annual awards show Sunday to fete Philly's funniest. Alison Zeidman, WitOut's editor in chief, says this year differs from the inaugural event, because it will have fewer inside jokes and more broad appeal to those who might not be as familiar with what Philadelphia comedy has to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By David Bauder, Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - In his forthcoming NBC comedy, Michael J. Fox will play a newscaster who had quit his job due to Parkinson's disease but returns to work in the show's first episode because a new medical regimen has helped him control many of the disease's symptoms. It mirrors the life of the former Family Ties and Spin City star, who said last year that drugs had helped minimize the physical tics of Parkinson's and had enabled him to take on more acting jobs. The yet-to-be-named sitcom is a key piece of NBC's strategy to build upon a revival that has brought the network back from many years in the ratings wilderness.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | Reprinted from Tuesday's issue. By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
  Parental Guidance is an engaging comedy that bridges multiple generation gaps, making it that rare movie that grandparents, their kids, and their kids can enjoy. Directed with more warmth than art by Andy Fickman, the film is just endearing enough to forgive it its contrivances. Artie and Diane (Billy Crystal and Bette Midler) are a Fresno, Calif., couple whose nest has been empty since Alice (Marisa Tomei), their only child, left for college. She is now married to Phil (Tom Everett Scott)
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
NBC must have confidence in its new First Family farce, 1600 Penn . The network is using what should be a highly trafficked spot after the final Monday performance show of The Voice to give this sitcom a sneak preview. Of course, NBC also used the Olympics to launch Animal Practice, and we know how that turned out. The concept of 1600 Penn is easy to grasp: It's Tommy Boy set in the White House. Josh Gad gets the Chris Farley role as the hefty, disaster-prone scion whose giddy enthusiasm always gets the better of him. (Gad even seems to have inherited Farley's three-sizes-too-small wardrobe.)
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Money doesn't make you happy. "But it sure buys you a better class of misery. " That joke, and thousands more, came from the mouths of top-drawer comics. But they were hatched in the overactive, irrepressibly silly, charmingly warped, and unfailingly funny mind of Sol Weinstein. A once-destitute Jersey boy who honed his gift for gags while banging out obituaries at the Trentonian, he rode a wave of laughs all the way to Hollywood. From the late 1950s into the '80s, he spun shtick for such legendary comedians as Joe E. Lewis and Bob Hope; wrote for The Love Boat , The Jeffersons , Three's Company , and Maude ; composed a signature song for Bobby Darin; and fathered James Bonds' Yiddish alter ego, Israel Bond, filling four popular books with the exploits of Agent Oy-Oy-7.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEW YORK - Gov. Christie jousted and joked with Comedy Central's Jon Stewart in a 25-minute interview Thursday night on The Daily Show that was one of the most engaging and probing television interviews for which the Republican governor has ever sat. Stewart devoted two of his show's three segments to Christie - an honor usually reserved for major figures such as presidents. And while part of the interview was funny, rehashing Christie's Jersey-tough-guy shtick, Stewart spent much of the time seizing on a more serious point: a perceived dearth in Republican empathy.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ANYONE WHO HAS sold a house knows that there can be a lag between the time of sale and the time you hold its profits in your hands. For Richard Butler, it's been six years. Now that the Daily News has intervened, he's hoping to get his cash by Christmas. But he's not holding his breath. He's been here before. The nonsense began in July 2010, when Butler received a letter stamped "urgent. " Despite its atrocious grammar, it brought exciting news from a man calling himself J.L. Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
One of the more provocative offerings of 2012's Philly Fringe festival was a raucous comedy with a dastardly premise: the elimination of two of the region's busiest actors. In Jeff Coon and Ben Dibble Must Die , local thespians Greg Nix and Michael Doherty, after countless auditions rendered futile by the mega-talents of Mssrs. Coon and Dibble, hire assassin Alex Bechtel to take down the title twosome. But the plot fails, and Nix and Doherty confront their nemeses with resignation.
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