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NEWS
May 24, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
BREAST-CANCER romcom - there's a phrase you don't hear every day. Or a movie you might never expect to see, although Danish director Susanne Bier makes a brave attempt in "Love is All You Need. " It's the bilingual (mostly English) story of a Danish hairdresser Ida (Trine Dyrholm) whose empty nest may soon be empty of her husband - he has a wandering eye and lately has been making eyes at his trashy bookkeeper. The least of her problems. She's just finished chemotherapy, and although her physicians say she is cancer-free, they are clumsily candid about her chances to remain so. (Bier has a knack for social awkwardness that flourishes during these scenes.)
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Got a minute? I've got 10 people you should meet. Exactly a minute. Six seconds for each. You can do it on Vine, Twitter's mobile app that lets people make and share six-second video loops known as "vines. " You could get a superfast introduction to the glories of this video-looping app via some of its budding auteurs, people like: Pete Heacock, proprietor of First Capital Pictures in North Philadelphia. His vines are suspense stories, jokes, self-portraits in the windows of passing trains . Three of his vines were nominated for awards at the Tribeca Film Festival in April.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
THE END of the world has been very good for Craig Robinson, but, then, everything's been good for the actor these days. The suddenly red-hot Robinson has his first leading-man role in the rom-com "Peeples," opening today, and has his second (as the Antichrist!) this fall in a comedy called "RapturePalooza. " Robinson is also part of the ensemble for "This Is the End," playing himself in a comedy about a bunch of actors (including Seth Rogen and Danny McBride) who happen to be at James Franco's apartment when the world ends.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Mickey Rose, 77, a childhood friend of Woody Allen's who cowrote his movies Bananas and Take the Money and Run , died of cancer April 7 at his home in Beverly Hills, his daughter, Jennifer, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Rose and Allen met in high school in Brooklyn, N.Y., and became friends. They shared a love of jazz and baseball. Mr. Rose met his late wife, Judy, through a blind date arranged by Allen. Mr. Rose became a TV comedy writer. He wrote for Johnny Carson and Sid Caesar and for shows including The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour , All in the Family , and The Odd Couple . Allen said Rose was one of the funniest people he has known - and a "wonderful first baseman.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Michael Harrington
Sunday   Life lessons Michael Whistler's comedy The Prescott Method: Easy Steps to Perfect Bread Baking Every Time , set in 1966, limns the friendship of university wives as they gather to knead some dough. The show goes on at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St., and continues on a Tuesday-through-Sunday schedule to April 14. Tickets are $30 to $40. Call 215-574-3550. . . . In Theresa Rebeck's comedy Seminar , four aspiring novelists endure unorthodox weekly workshops with a famed literary lion who proceeds to mercilessly rip their work to shreds.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
JUST AS the caveman comedy "The Croods" hits theaters, there is breaking Neanderthal news. This just in: Scientists at the Natural History Museum now believe that our cousin the Neanderthal, whose brain was as big as ours, died out because too much of his brain was dedicated to vision and physical ability, and not enough to socialization and thinking. Thus, he was unable to "cope with environmental change and competition. " This is, rather shockingly, the precise story line of the new 3-D animated comedy "The Croods," though with an upbeat spin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Stop me if you've heard this one: Philly is finally fully funny. There's Helium Comedy Club, where top national acts fill the room alongside such notable local stand-ups as Chip Chantry, Juliet Hope Wayne, and Doogie Horner. Spaces from PhilaMOCA to the Trocadero host comedy affairs of varying scale. We've got valued sketch troupes, improv crews and collectives with regular gigs - Comedy Sportz, Secret Pants, Philly Improv Theatre, Sideshow Presents, and the N Crowd - and more open mikes for them than you can throw a stick at, if throwing a stick is your idea of fun. "So many locals are working to make improv, stand-up, and sketch accessible," says Alison Zeidman of WitOut.net, a two-year-old info-packed comedy zine created by Luke Giordano and Aaron Hertzog.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLINS, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
WHOOPI GOLDBERG lives on the comedic edge, whether it's on the stage, on set or in her swivel chair on "The View. " She doesn't shy away from the controversial - she welcomes it. Back in 1990, in "Whoopi Goldberg Presents Billy Connolly," Goldberg began a bit by singing, "Where have all the negroes gone?" She urged members of the audience to sing along with her and "follow the bouncing Negro!" Despite early hesitation, they did. "And they said y'all wouldn't do that!" she laughed.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
MARLON Wayans had to make "A Haunted House," his new found-footage - shot as if it were an amateur film - comedy flick, or else he would have been out of a job. "I like to work and there's no movies for actors, period, especially black actors. When white actors are like, 'Man, there's no work out there,' then black actors are like, 'Are you kidding me?'" Wayans said during a recent trip to Philly. Since Wayans moved to L.A., he has fended for himself. "["Boyz in the Hood" director]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
PHILLY HAS never lacked for hilarity. Ben Franklin was internationally funny. Comedy legends like Bill Cosby and Bob Saget were molded in our city. And our sports teams make us laugh - if only to keep from crying. But Philly has never been known for its comedy scene the way Chicago, Boston or Austin have. But that's changing, as evidenced by the WitOut Awards for Philadelphia Comedy. Comedy blog WitOut.net will host its second annual awards show Sunday to fete Philly's funniest. Alison Zeidman, WitOut's editor in chief, says this year differs from the inaugural event, because it will have fewer inside jokes and more broad appeal to those who might not be as familiar with what Philadelphia comedy has to offer.
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