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NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The likenesses of heroes ranging from Spiderman to Hank Aaron will be available for purchase today at a baseball card show at the Landmark Inn in Maple Shade and a comic book convention at the Holiday Inn in Cherry Hill. The baseball card show is sponsored by East Coast Baseball Cards, a Cherry Hill-based company owned by 15-year-old Mark Lomas. About 50 dealers will be displaying and selling "millions" of baseball cards, including single cards and sets, Lomas said. The prices for single baseball cards can range from "a dime up to $30,000" (the most valuable being the 1908 Honus Wagner card)
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frank Gullo wanted to measure himself against the gurus of comic-book artistry. So the 18-year-old began penciling his own renditions of popular characters, including the Silver Surfer, Batman and one icon named Venom. His favorite: the Wolverine, half man, half wolf, with a dark sense of humor. "He keeps to himself, but is a berserker," Gullo said. "He goes wild. " For the former Upper Moreland High School student who recently moved to southern Italy with his parents, drawing had become an obsession.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
John "Loop" Lupo gingerly picks up The Nine Rings of Wutang comic book from a shelf on the back wall of his store as if it is precious. Presenting it like an altar boy holding a communion plate, Lupo places it on a box of densely packed, wrapped comic books for a visitor to see. "When I was a kid, I'd just get in the bed and sleep on them [comics]," said the 47-year-old owner of Stormwatch Comics as he handled the $2.95 comic book. "But to take care of them, you can't just fold them back when you open them because you'll be breaking the spine.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
Invincible. Amazing. Unstoppable. When I was a kid, such larger-than-life language sucked me into the world of comic books. They featured ordinary people for the most part, who through a set of bizarre circumstances acquired powers that made them superheroes. The Avenging Angel. The Diabolical Dr. Doom. And my all-time favorite, the Uncanny X-Men. The combination of great illustrations, over-the-top prose, and riveting story lines kept me spending my 25 cents each week for the next cliff-hanger.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1988 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
New from Marvel Comics: Spider-Man meets the Incredible Raider. Spider-Man, you all know. Great climber, avenger of crime, star superhero. The Incredible Raider, with apologies to the Incredible Hulk, is Ronald O. Perelman, Philadelphian now in New York, chairman of Revlon Inc., feared predator on Wall Street. Perelman controls enough spare change to take over several billion-dollar companies tomorrow if he wanted to. So when he announced last month that he was buying Marvel Comics for a mere $82.5 million, it left people wondering whether maybe the savvy investor was on to something.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | BY SONJA JANE HASKINS
OK, so I'm no longer pubescent, but I read comic books. I began, I suppose, like any other normal person: reading the forbidden things in secret. Although over the years, comics have addressed "real life" issues, including, for example, rape, child abuse and substance addiction, with "real life" settings and relationships, there is something serendipitous still about the heroes handsome and heroic, the heroines handsome and heroic, and the abrasive, megalomaniac bad guys. Perhaps the most pervasive reason for reading comics is the most personal.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Georgia S. Ashby, Special to The Inquirer
Henry Chmielefski is not your stereotypical, lunch money-squandering Batman addict - a 12-year-old boy in sneakers with fantasies of invincible biceps, triceps and pecs. Henry Chmielefski is a grown-up. A man who works for a living. A father. But there he was, hanging around last Saturday at a comic convention in the Woodhaven Howard Johnson's, in a room designed for wedding receptions, as tons of comic books were rolled in on dollies and set up behind clip-on spotlights that displayed rare editions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic Book Confidential compresses 55 years of comic-book history - from Batman to Big Baby, from the Flash to the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers - into a breezy, eye-grabbing 90 minutes of pop-culture commentary. Canadian filmmaker Ron Mann has said that he came to this project knowing next to nothing about the flimsy newsprint picture books, and that's probably just as well. Spawned in the '30s as a newsstand alternative to the Sunday funnies, comics developed into a form that now accommodates everything from sophomoric yuks and straight-arrow superheroics to gripping "graphic novels" about African apartheid and the Holocaust.
NEWS
November 30, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Beginning this weekend with a two-day "quality auction" at the Slosberg Auction Gallery and culminating next weekend in a major art sale at Freeman's, the December auction calendar will offer a solid week of opportunities to bid on everything from works by students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts to collectible comic books. The comic books will be offered at the first session of the Slosberg sale, beginning at 10 a.m. today at the gallery, 2501 E. Ontario St. The 500 lots include specimens from the so-called golden age of the 1940s and '50s, such as Weird Chills and Amazing Adventures, and some from the later "silver age," such as Hawkman and the Fantastic Four.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo da Vinci is one of those impossibly gifted giants whose life was so remarkable, yet so full of mystery, it has inspired some seriously wacked-out theories. Dan Brown had da Vinci enmeshed in a millennia-old conspiracy hatched by the Catholic Church. There's plenty of the same off-the-wall madness in Da Vinci's Demons , writer-producer David S. Goyer's delirious TV drama that returns for a second season 9 p.m. Saturday on Starz. Off-the-wall? Saturday's episode opens atop Machu Picchu (in present-day Peru)
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
ONE OF THE things that is hardest to pull off with Thor is balancing the Asgardian, god-like stuff with down-to-Earth moments - to be action-packed and with a sense of grandeur, yet at the same time have a relatable, whimsical sense of humor. This was best exemplified by Walt Simonson's famed comic book run on the Thunder God in the 1980s. Even Simonson himself, who refused to be quoted for this story, made it clear that he was looking forward to this weekend's "Thor" sequel and has made it clear he is happy that the movie is focusing not only on Thor but on Norse mythology characters he introduced to readers three decades ago. Back then, The Mighty Thor wasn't really mighty in the sales department.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's back-to-school season, so put these applications on your smartphone or tablet to help with the important educational matters of free reading, writing, and comic books (yes, comic books). Free Books , from Digital Press Publishing L.L.C., provides access to an advertised 23,469 classic books. The Apple version is 99 cents, the Android version from the Google Play site is free. You'll find everything from Alice in Wonderland to the Kama Sutra . In Free Books, search for a book you've been assigned to read, or browse by genre or among the featured selections.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Tiaira Rodgers has a sweet sparrow of a voice but knows how to make herself heard in print. "I feel like some adults think, 'Oh . . . they're just kids, they don't know anything,' but that's not true," she wrote. "I'm a Philadelphian, I know what goes on here. I understand that if one person suffers, we all can suffer. If one person succeeds we all can succeed. " Mighty Writers, a grand name, is a rec center for the mind. The passage is from her "Letter to Philadelphia," a testament of hope.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
We're selling the house our parents bought for $8,500 in 1956. My five siblings and I moved out many years ago, but we've always been able to come back - from college or the military - for a celebration or crisis to the modest house in North Adams, Mass. So it's hard to imagine that soon, no one named Riordan will be living there. Perhaps you have, or had, such a house yourself: the backdrop for those first-day-of-school photos, the setting for the family's favorite stories. Like the one about our youngest brother breaking his collarbone on Mother's Day two years in a row. Or our mother somehow getting between two of her sons as they had a fistfight - over a doughnut.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Joe Kubert, the influential comic book artist and writer whose rugged, hyper-masculine artwork included Tarzan, the flying super-hero Hawkman, the World War II infantryman Sgt. Rock, and graphic novels about the Bosnian war and the Holocaust, died Aug. 12 at a hospital in Morristown, N.J. A spokesman at Mr. Kubert's comic trade school, the Dover, N.J.-based Kubert School, said the cause was multiple myeloma. Mr. Kubert, whose career spanned more than seven decades, started in comic books during the industry's infancy as a boy prodigy.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shakespearean classics as comic books? Dante reduced to some sleazy strip out of the Sunday funnies? The Great Books - all those texts teachers told us to revere as holy, inviolate - increasingly are showing up on the graphic-novel shelves. For some, it's a potential nightmare: Homer's Iliad sitting next to Homer Simpson; Shakespeare's Tempest next to Peanuts . Yet artists and teachers alike are embracing recent graphic novelizations of a dozen great books, from the Bard of Avon's greatest tragedies to novels and short stories by Franz Kafka.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Local comic-book publisher Zenescope is on a roll and the latest proof is that Lionsgate TV is going down "‘Alice in Wonderland's" rabbit hole.   The studio that brought you "Mad Men" has emerged the winner for TV rights to Zenescope's "Wonderland" graphic novels, the company's editor in chief, Ralph Tedesco, told People Paper Comics Guy Jerome Maida. "I recently went to Los Angeles to pitch the property for TV, which was the first time we really focused on pitching for television," Tedesco said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
ST. MARIA Goretti High School is a home for orphaned vampire girls. An abandoned Fishtown factory is a space station infiltrated by werewolves. A Jefferson frat house is the home of murderous, demon-possessed sorority sisters. At least in the minds of Tony Trov and Johnny Zito, two South Philly-born-and-bred comics writers who transform Philadelphia into their own fantastic, dark playground. In a panel from their comic La Morte Sisters, about a version of Goretti (now Ss. John Neumann and Maria Goretti High School)
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