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NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The likenesses of heroes ranging from Spiderman to Hank Aaron will be available for purchase today at a baseball card show at the Landmark Inn in Maple Shade and a comic book convention at the Holiday Inn in Cherry Hill. The baseball card show is sponsored by East Coast Baseball Cards, a Cherry Hill-based company owned by 15-year-old Mark Lomas. About 50 dealers will be displaying and selling "millions" of baseball cards, including single cards and sets, Lomas said. The prices for single baseball cards can range from "a dime up to $30,000" (the most valuable being the 1908 Honus Wagner card)
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frank Gullo wanted to measure himself against the gurus of comic-book artistry. So the 18-year-old began penciling his own renditions of popular characters, including the Silver Surfer, Batman and one icon named Venom. His favorite: the Wolverine, half man, half wolf, with a dark sense of humor. "He keeps to himself, but is a berserker," Gullo said. "He goes wild. " For the former Upper Moreland High School student who recently moved to southern Italy with his parents, drawing had become an obsession.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
John "Loop" Lupo gingerly picks up The Nine Rings of Wutang comic book from a shelf on the back wall of his store as if it is precious. Presenting it like an altar boy holding a communion plate, Lupo places it on a box of densely packed, wrapped comic books for a visitor to see. "When I was a kid, I'd just get in the bed and sleep on them [comics]," said the 47-year-old owner of Stormwatch Comics as he handled the $2.95 comic book. "But to take care of them, you can't just fold them back when you open them because you'll be breaking the spine.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1988 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
New from Marvel Comics: Spider-Man meets the Incredible Raider. Spider-Man, you all know. Great climber, avenger of crime, star superhero. The Incredible Raider, with apologies to the Incredible Hulk, is Ronald O. Perelman, Philadelphian now in New York, chairman of Revlon Inc., feared predator on Wall Street. Perelman controls enough spare change to take over several billion-dollar companies tomorrow if he wanted to. So when he announced last month that he was buying Marvel Comics for a mere $82.5 million, it left people wondering whether maybe the savvy investor was on to something.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | BY SONJA JANE HASKINS
OK, so I'm no longer pubescent, but I read comic books. I began, I suppose, like any other normal person: reading the forbidden things in secret. Although over the years, comics have addressed "real life" issues, including, for example, rape, child abuse and substance addiction, with "real life" settings and relationships, there is something serendipitous still about the heroes handsome and heroic, the heroines handsome and heroic, and the abrasive, megalomaniac bad guys. Perhaps the most pervasive reason for reading comics is the most personal.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
Invincible. Amazing. Unstoppable. When I was a kid, such larger-than-life language sucked me into the world of comic books. They featured ordinary people for the most part, who through a set of bizarre circumstances acquired powers that made them superheroes. The Avenging Angel. The Diabolical Dr. Doom. And my all-time favorite, the Uncanny X-Men. The combination of great illustrations, over-the-top prose, and riveting story lines kept me spending my 25 cents each week for the next cliff-hanger.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Georgia S. Ashby, Special to The Inquirer
Henry Chmielefski is not your stereotypical, lunch money-squandering Batman addict - a 12-year-old boy in sneakers with fantasies of invincible biceps, triceps and pecs. Henry Chmielefski is a grown-up. A man who works for a living. A father. But there he was, hanging around last Saturday at a comic convention in the Woodhaven Howard Johnson's, in a room designed for wedding receptions, as tons of comic books were rolled in on dollies and set up behind clip-on spotlights that displayed rare editions.
NEWS
November 30, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Beginning this weekend with a two-day "quality auction" at the Slosberg Auction Gallery and culminating next weekend in a major art sale at Freeman's, the December auction calendar will offer a solid week of opportunities to bid on everything from works by students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts to collectible comic books. The comic books will be offered at the first session of the Slosberg sale, beginning at 10 a.m. today at the gallery, 2501 E. Ontario St. The 500 lots include specimens from the so-called golden age of the 1940s and '50s, such as Weird Chills and Amazing Adventures, and some from the later "silver age," such as Hawkman and the Fantastic Four.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic Book Confidential compresses 55 years of comic-book history - from Batman to Big Baby, from the Flash to the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers - into a breezy, eye-grabbing 90 minutes of pop-culture commentary. Canadian filmmaker Ron Mann has said that he came to this project knowing next to nothing about the flimsy newsprint picture books, and that's probably just as well. Spawned in the '30s as a newsstand alternative to the Sunday funnies, comics developed into a form that now accommodates everything from sophomoric yuks and straight-arrow superheroics to gripping "graphic novels" about African apartheid and the Holocaust.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Brady was volunteering at Cooper's Poynt School in Camden, helping 5- and 6-year-old kindergartners with early reading and math skills, when he noticed something super about their wardrobe and backpack choices. "The kids there, they all have Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, all these superheroes from faraway cities," Brady said. "I thought, maybe if they had a superhero who was from their city, they'd have something to be excited about. " Thus, the Bolt was born. Brady, 25, a self-described geek who has loved comic books since before he could read, created Sean, a college student at Ruttledge-Camden (a stand-in for Rutgers-Camden)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE TERM "living legend" is thrown around pretty loosely these days. However, when it comes to Neal Adams, the description is more than apt - and richly deserved. It was Adams who defined the look of iconic characters like Batman, Superman and Green Arrow for the modern age. In other words, it was Adams who gave them the look that we associate with them today. "All I really did was bring Batman back to what he was supposed to be," Adams said with typical modesty. "I didn't really change him. " Nevertheless, it is Adams' look for Batman and the others that almost every artist who has drawn the characters since aspires to. That's pretty impressive, but it pales in comparison to Adams' advocacy for creator rights, which was seared into him when he saw scores of artists lose their jobs because of a congressional crackdown on comics in the 1950s that made horror and crime comics disappear and prompted a Comics Code Authority to establish guidelines on appropriate content.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
MARVEL AND DC may dominate the comic-book market, but one of the top independent publishers is based in Horsham. It's Zenescope, started by Upper Dublin's Ralph Tedesco and Abington's Joe Brusha, which is celebrating its ninth year in business and the 100th issue of its flagship comic, Grimm Fairy Tales . Growing up, Brusha was the comic-book fan, while Tedesco wanted to be an actor. The pair had written screenplays, but it was when Tedesco was home from California for a wedding that Brusha asked him what he knew about comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I mean, I want to get married someday ," Corinne Mucha's boyfriend told her, a few months after persuading her to give up her life on the East Coast and follow him to Chicago. "Just not to you. " Ouch! So Mucha, who grew up in Haddon Heights, writes in her new graphic memoir, Get Over It (Secret Acres, $11.99), a moving, alternately heartbreaking and hilarious true-life account of the breakup of Her First Major Romance. Her ex-boyfriend, Sam (last name withheld)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
MARV WOLFMAN, a true legend in the comics industry, is coming to Wizard Con Philly 2014 this week. He's as excited to be here as fans are to have him. In fact, he wants to stick around - after his panel appearances and autograph signings at the con - to see the sites. "When I was a kid, I used to come down to Philly with my family and remember it fondly," he said. "Coming back, I think the city has fixed itself up and is now better than ever. " Wolfman also is looking forward to getting a cheesesteak at Reading Terminal Market ("they have really good ones")
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
AT THE box office and in the comic books that gave him birth, some signs are pointing to a slight decline in the popularity of Spider-Man, so Sony is hoping that "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" (in theaters today) will juice audiences for a franchise that already has four more sequels and spinoffs planned for the next four years. The first "Spider-Man" film a dozen years ago had a then-unheard of opening weekend haul of $114 million, on its way to a massive $403 million total. However, each subsequent film has seen a drop at the domestic box-office, culminating in "Amazing Spider-Man," the first film in what many thought was an unnecessary reboot, grossing only $262 million domestically.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo da Vinci is one of those impossibly gifted giants whose life was so remarkable, yet so full of mystery, it has inspired some seriously wacked-out theories. Dan Brown had da Vinci enmeshed in a millennia-old conspiracy hatched by the Catholic Church. There's plenty of the same off-the-wall madness in Da Vinci's Demons , writer-producer David S. Goyer's delirious TV drama that returns for a second season 9 p.m. Saturday on Starz. Off-the-wall? Saturday's episode opens atop Machu Picchu (in present-day Peru)
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
ONE OF THE things that is hardest to pull off with Thor is balancing the Asgardian, god-like stuff with down-to-Earth moments - to be action-packed and with a sense of grandeur, yet at the same time have a relatable, whimsical sense of humor. This was best exemplified by Walt Simonson's famed comic book run on the Thunder God in the 1980s. Even Simonson himself, who refused to be quoted for this story, made it clear that he was looking forward to this weekend's "Thor" sequel and has made it clear he is happy that the movie is focusing not only on Thor but on Norse mythology characters he introduced to readers three decades ago. Back then, The Mighty Thor wasn't really mighty in the sales department.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's back-to-school season, so put these applications on your smartphone or tablet to help with the important educational matters of free reading, writing, and comic books (yes, comic books). Free Books , from Digital Press Publishing L.L.C., provides access to an advertised 23,469 classic books. The Apple version is 99 cents, the Android version from the Google Play site is free. You'll find everything from Alice in Wonderland to the Kama Sutra . In Free Books, search for a book you've been assigned to read, or browse by genre or among the featured selections.
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