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Comic Books

ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With the final "Star Wars" movie hitting screens yesterday, fans of the series may be wondering how they will be able to get their fix of tales involving bounty hunters, Jedis, princesses, villains and Wookies. The answer? Bookstores and comic-book shops. The steady offerings of "Star Wars"-based novels are perennial bestsellers. Also, Dark Horse Comics has been publishing "Star Wars" comics for 13 years. In addition to the traditional movie adaptation, Dark Horse has made sure to have a bunch of "Revenge of the Sith"-related comics on store shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2001 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
THE MOST COLOSSAL combination in comic books - and one of the biggest collaborations in pop culture, period - is occurring as you read this. Imagine George Lucas directing "Star Trek. " (Yeah, right.) Or James Bond in the hands of James Cameron. (Ditto.) Or Superman and Batman redrawn by Stan Lee, the legendary comic-book creator. (No joke.) Lee and DC Comics have teamed up for a series titled "Just Imagine Stan Lee Creating...," which gives Lee the freedom to literally re-create Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and others.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1993 | By Elizabeth Judd, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thomas Range 2d's discovery of comic books is a storybook tale of triumph over adversity. When Range's younger brother, Vincent, broke both his wrists in a swing-set accident, relatives bought the convalescing fifth grader comic books, and Thomas Range turned the pages as the brothers read together. Soon, both boys were hooked on the adventures of "The Fantastic Four" and "The Defenders. " "It became like an addiction," said Thomas Range. "We had to have the next one. " This spring, Range, now in his mid-20s, launched Amelia Publishing, an independent comic-book publishing company, in Levittown.
LIVING
October 7, 1993 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It would have been a perfect time for Superman or Batman or even Spider-Man to come and save the day. Here was 21-year-old David Greenhill, the creator of Comicfest '93, facing a real crisis as he tried to set up what is billed as the largest comic-book convention in the nation, scheduled to open to the public tomorrow at the Philadelphia Civic Center. Greenhill, who made his name by starting a mail-order sports-card trading company at the age of 15, and nursing it all the way to being an $11 million business, was beginning to panic.
NEWS
January 9, 2005 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Every aspect of Mike Penny's life is keenly calculated. When he was pursuing a bachelor's degree in business management at Rowan University, he put all of his energy into his education. But always at the back of his mind was a lifelong dream of writing and producing a series of comic books. "I just like reading them. I just enjoyed it so much I thought of writing them," he said. Penny, 28, who graduated in 2000, realized his dream in November with Helios, an action-packed, comic-book thriller that follows the lives of Sunstrike, Facade and Blur, three "neogenic" superheroes whose altered genes endow them with unusual powers, which they use working for the U.S. government.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dan Gutman, a Haddonfield author of seven off-beat books about baseball, knows how to lecture fifth-graders. "I get some volunteers to re-create Merkle's bonehead play," said Gutman. That play, an infamous 1908 base-running gaffe by Fred Merkle, cost the New York Giants the pennant that year. "I pull volunteers up, and set up some base paths. "The teacher is always Merkle, of course," said Gutman. "I don't want some kid to be called bonehead the rest of his life. " Gutman and a half-dozen other professional writers were at Gateway Regional High School about a week ago for Young Authors Day. About 200 fifth graders gathered from the district's four elementary schools to listen and, as with Gutman, play along with professionals from every branch of the publishing industry, from writers to illustrators to bookbinders.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | By Steve Appleford FOR THE INQUIRER
Tobey Maguire isn't the sort of guy who wears spandex. Not at home and definitely not here, sitting in a luxury hotel suite, outfitted in crisp dark threads, his short hair combed into a precise wedge. Now he's destined to be forever known as the man in the Spider-Man suit, a second skin of red and blue stretched across his newly muscled body. For much of last year, this respected 26-year-old actor (Wonder Boys, Cider House Rules, Pleasantville) shaved his ankles and calves to ease the pain of stepping into the web-slinging superhero's unitard.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's an obsessive-compulsive Cleveland file clerk to do? For Harvey Pekar, a guy who can't draw or type but is burdened with a pathological need to chronicle the Chekhovian struggle of his day-to-day existence, there's never been any choice but to write stories. Stories about walking in the bitter cold to the Veterans Administration hospital job he's held since 1966, and mooching jelly doughnuts off doctors once he arrives. Stories about losing his glasses. Stories about growing up in an immigrant Jewish enclave.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The comic-book character created by Al Wiesner has the superhero M.O. He can fly, wears a leotard over bulging muscles, and can save the world on his lunch break. But when the plot requires a feat of derring-do, this superhero emerges from his secret identity at the sound of a distinctive call to action: "Oi-Vay. " Within seconds, it's Shaloman to the rescue. Wiesner, of Warminster, is the artist behind what he calls a pioneering "Kosher Crusader. " Shaloman wears a yarmulke, and the insignia on his chest is a Hebrew letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Is it "Batman"? No. "Dick Tracy"? Not quite. But it's clear the makers of "The Flash," TV's new version of the comic-book superhero story, watched those big money-making feature films and got some ideas. So in the new weekly series "The Flash," which premieres with a two-hour movie tonight at 8 on Channel 10, all the buildings have a dashing, Art-Deco look. Mom is always wearing an apron and cooking - just like in the comic books and their film adaptations. Unfortunately, unlike the movies, "The Flash" makes no attempt to rise above comic-book level.
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