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BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
AFTER NEARLY 20 years, James Bond is returning to comics. Dynamite Entertainment, of Mount Laurel, N.J., has announced perhaps the biggest deal in its history, landing the worldwide rights to publish comic books, digital comics and graphic novels starring Ian Fleming 's Secret Agent 007. As part of the deal, Dynamite plans to create a series of brand-new adventures about the little-known early years of Bond's career, in addition to bringing...
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Brady was volunteering at Cooper's Poynt School in Camden, helping 5- and 6-year-old kindergartners with early reading and math skills, when he noticed something super about their wardrobe and backpack choices. "The kids there, they all have Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, all these superheroes from faraway cities," Brady said. "I thought, maybe if they had a superhero who was from their city, they'd have something to be excited about. " Thus, the Bolt was born. Brady, 25, a self-described geek who has loved comic books since before he could read, created Sean, a college student at Ruttledge-Camden (a stand-in for Rutgers-Camden)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE TERM "living legend" is thrown around pretty loosely these days. However, when it comes to Neal Adams, the description is more than apt - and richly deserved. It was Adams who defined the look of iconic characters like Batman, Superman and Green Arrow for the modern age. In other words, it was Adams who gave them the look that we associate with them today. "All I really did was bring Batman back to what he was supposed to be," Adams said with typical modesty. "I didn't really change him. " Nevertheless, it is Adams' look for Batman and the others that almost every artist who has drawn the characters since aspires to. That's pretty impressive, but it pales in comparison to Adams' advocacy for creator rights, which was seared into him when he saw scores of artists lose their jobs because of a congressional crackdown on comics in the 1950s that made horror and crime comics disappear and prompted a Comics Code Authority to establish guidelines on appropriate content.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
MARVEL AND DC may dominate the comic-book market, but one of the top independent publishers is based in Horsham. It's Zenescope, started by Upper Dublin's Ralph Tedesco and Abington's Joe Brusha, which is celebrating its ninth year in business and the 100th issue of its flagship comic, Grimm Fairy Tales . Growing up, Brusha was the comic-book fan, while Tedesco wanted to be an actor. The pair had written screenplays, but it was when Tedesco was home from California for a wedding that Brusha asked him what he knew about comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I mean, I want to get married someday ," Corinne Mucha's boyfriend told her, a few months after persuading her to give up her life on the East Coast and follow him to Chicago. "Just not to you. " Ouch! So Mucha, who grew up in Haddon Heights, writes in her new graphic memoir, Get Over It (Secret Acres, $11.99), a moving, alternately heartbreaking and hilarious true-life account of the breakup of Her First Major Romance. Her ex-boyfriend, Sam (last name withheld)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
MARV WOLFMAN, a true legend in the comics industry, is coming to Wizard Con Philly 2014 this week. He's as excited to be here as fans are to have him. In fact, he wants to stick around - after his panel appearances and autograph signings at the con - to see the sites. "When I was a kid, I used to come down to Philly with my family and remember it fondly," he said. "Coming back, I think the city has fixed itself up and is now better than ever. " Wolfman also is looking forward to getting a cheesesteak at Reading Terminal Market ("they have really good ones")
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
AT THE box office and in the comic books that gave him birth, some signs are pointing to a slight decline in the popularity of Spider-Man, so Sony is hoping that "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" (in theaters today) will juice audiences for a franchise that already has four more sequels and spinoffs planned for the next four years. The first "Spider-Man" film a dozen years ago had a then-unheard of opening weekend haul of $114 million, on its way to a massive $403 million total. However, each subsequent film has seen a drop at the domestic box-office, culminating in "Amazing Spider-Man," the first film in what many thought was an unnecessary reboot, grossing only $262 million domestically.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo da Vinci is one of those impossibly gifted giants whose life was so remarkable, yet so full of mystery, it has inspired some seriously wacked-out theories. Dan Brown had da Vinci enmeshed in a millennia-old conspiracy hatched by the Catholic Church. There's plenty of the same off-the-wall madness in Da Vinci's Demons , writer-producer David S. Goyer's delirious TV drama that returns for a second season 9 p.m. Saturday on Starz. Off-the-wall? Saturday's episode opens atop Machu Picchu (in present-day Peru)
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
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