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NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
AT THE box office and in the comic books that gave him birth, some signs are pointing to a slight decline in the popularity of Spider-Man, so Sony is hoping that "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" (in theaters today) will juice audiences for a franchise that already has four more sequels and spinoffs planned for the next four years. The first "Spider-Man" film a dozen years ago had a then-unheard of opening weekend haul of $114 million, on its way to a massive $403 million total. However, each subsequent film has seen a drop at the domestic box-office, culminating in "Amazing Spider-Man," the first film in what many thought was an unnecessary reboot, grossing only $262 million domestically.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo da Vinci is one of those impossibly gifted giants whose life was so remarkable, yet so full of mystery, it has inspired some seriously wacked-out theories. Dan Brown had da Vinci enmeshed in a millennia-old conspiracy hatched by the Catholic Church. There's plenty of the same off-the-wall madness in Da Vinci's Demons , writer-producer David S. Goyer's delirious TV drama that returns for a second season 9 p.m. Saturday on Starz. Off-the-wall? Saturday's episode opens atop Machu Picchu (in present-day Peru)
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rob Kelly remembers reading Aquaman in the back seat as his family headed for summer vacations in the Poconos. That was in the 1980s, when Kelly was a comics-crazed, TV-and-movie-mad Cherry Hill kid with a weakness for the environmentally enlightened exploits of the amphibious DC Comics superhero. Imagine how sweet it is for Kelly, now 42, to collect and curate other people's comic book memories and reveries, including those of Aquaman scribe Paul Kupperberg. "I became friends with him through my Aquaman shrine blog," Kelly says.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
ONE OF THE things that is hardest to pull off with Thor is balancing the Asgardian, god-like stuff with down-to-Earth moments - to be action-packed and with a sense of grandeur, yet at the same time have a relatable, whimsical sense of humor. This was best exemplified by Walt Simonson's famed comic book run on the Thunder God in the 1980s. Even Simonson himself, who refused to be quoted for this story, made it clear that he was looking forward to this weekend's "Thor" sequel and has made it clear he is happy that the movie is focusing not only on Thor but on Norse mythology characters he introduced to readers three decades ago. Back then, The Mighty Thor wasn't really mighty in the sales department.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's back-to-school season, so put these applications on your smartphone or tablet to help with the important educational matters of free reading, writing, and comic books (yes, comic books). Free Books , from Digital Press Publishing L.L.C., provides access to an advertised 23,469 classic books. The Apple version is 99 cents, the Android version from the Google Play site is free. You'll find everything from Alice in Wonderland to the Kama Sutra . In Free Books, search for a book you've been assigned to read, or browse by genre or among the featured selections.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Tiaira Rodgers has a sweet sparrow of a voice but knows how to make herself heard in print. "I feel like some adults think, 'Oh . . . they're just kids, they don't know anything,' but that's not true," she wrote. "I'm a Philadelphian, I know what goes on here. I understand that if one person suffers, we all can suffer. If one person succeeds we all can succeed. " Mighty Writers, a grand name, is a rec center for the mind. The passage is from her "Letter to Philadelphia," a testament of hope.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
We're selling the house our parents bought for $8,500 in 1956. My five siblings and I moved out many years ago, but we've always been able to come back - from college or the military - for a celebration or crisis to the modest house in North Adams, Mass. So it's hard to imagine that soon, no one named Riordan will be living there. Perhaps you have, or had, such a house yourself: the backdrop for those first-day-of-school photos, the setting for the family's favorite stories. Like the one about our youngest brother breaking his collarbone on Mother's Day two years in a row. Or our mother somehow getting between two of her sons as they had a fistfight - over a doughnut.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Joe Kubert, the influential comic book artist and writer whose rugged, hyper-masculine artwork included Tarzan, the flying super-hero Hawkman, the World War II infantryman Sgt. Rock, and graphic novels about the Bosnian war and the Holocaust, died Aug. 12 at a hospital in Morristown, N.J. A spokesman at Mr. Kubert's comic trade school, the Dover, N.J.-based Kubert School, said the cause was multiple myeloma. Mr. Kubert, whose career spanned more than seven decades, started in comic books during the industry's infancy as a boy prodigy.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shakespearean classics as comic books? Dante reduced to some sleazy strip out of the Sunday funnies? The Great Books - all those texts teachers told us to revere as holy, inviolate - increasingly are showing up on the graphic-novel shelves. For some, it's a potential nightmare: Homer's Iliad sitting next to Homer Simpson; Shakespeare's Tempest next to Peanuts . Yet artists and teachers alike are embracing recent graphic novelizations of a dozen great books, from the Bard of Avon's greatest tragedies to novels and short stories by Franz Kafka.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Local comic-book publisher Zenescope is on a roll and the latest proof is that Lionsgate TV is going down "‘Alice in Wonderland's" rabbit hole.   The studio that brought you "Mad Men" has emerged the winner for TV rights to Zenescope's "Wonderland" graphic novels, the company's editor in chief, Ralph Tedesco, told People Paper Comics Guy Jerome Maida. "I recently went to Los Angeles to pitch the property for TV, which was the first time we really focused on pitching for television," Tedesco said.
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