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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1989 | By John Barbour, Special to the Daily News
Call it a laughter explosion. Ten years ago there were fewer than 20 comedy clubs in the United States. Today there are some 225 of them out there, dedicated to making people laugh for a $10 to $20 cover charge and the price of a drink or two. It's a growth rate of nine clubs a year for the last quarter of a century. And thousands of comics are laughing their way to the bank. They can find work on some 700 stages where comics are featured, not to mention the growing number of comedy shows on television.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rodney Dangerfields of Mummery say that cutting time off their comic performances in the New Year's parade is no laughing matter. Murray Comic Club President Rich Porco says he'll cooperate fully with Mayor Rendell's challenge to speed the parade, but he's tired of Comics getting blamed for delays and rowdiness. "We're stacking people more tightly. We're discouraging conversations with sidewalk fans. We're urging immediate reaction to signals by starters and officers to keep the parade moving," Porco said Monday night as he issued marching orders for his Comic army of 1,900 clowns, wenches and characters.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't tell the kids, but Julius Tarshis, the man who used to make the color plates for the printing of Batman, Superman and other great comic figures, loved the Sistine Chapel. "When he went to Rome, he sat there for four hours looking at the ceiling," said his daughter, Sandra Herbets. "He flipped out - literally -when he went to Europe and Spain. My mother would walk out (of a museum) and come back and he would still be there. " Mr. Tarshis, 87, who studied to be an artist, but who made his living as a photoengraver for comics, died Tuesday at his home in Meadowbrook, near Jenkintown.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
The odds of succeeding as a stand-up comic are pretty small. First, you play in smoky bars for all the food you can eat, then graduate to opening in Chattanooga, Tenn., for a country-and-western act. Then, if you slay 'em on all the college campuses and People magazine does a paragraph-long profile, maybe you get a shot on cable television. Cable has turned into an electronic Borscht Belt for comics who would be big. It's the slippery middle step between local and national fame.
NEWS
May 1, 2001
Can't we have other continuous-plot comics besides "Gil Thorp"? We used to have Mary Worth, Brenda Starr, Dick Tracy, etc. And why is "Gil Thorp" relegated to the back pages? Everyone tears the paper apart looking for it. My kids went through a snowstorm to get the Daily News to see what happened to Gil. MARION VANDERGRIFT, Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"The more you drive, the less intelligent you are," theorized Miller, the spaced-out auto mechanic in Repo Man. And now, with Speed Zone - at last count the third film about that yawning cross-country car race, the Cannonball Run - you have irrefutable proof of his theory. A moving violation in more ways than one, Speed Zone stars SCTV alumni John Candy, Eugene Levy and Joe Flaherty as entrants in the unsanctioned road event that is the cinematic equivalent of a demolition derby.
NEWS
August 21, 2011
Stan Wischnowski is the editor of The Inquirer 'You have removed several really good comics. . . . You indicate some can be found online. What if one does not have a computer? You have crammed all the comics onto one page, and puzzles on another. . . . You have changed your editorial pages, which was no improvement. . . . What's going on here?!" These sentiments of a longtime reader are representative of the mail I've been receiving as a result of recent changes in the paper.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
"Doesn't Pat Buchanan look like the kid you went to school with, the one who was always beating up the kid who looked like Steve Forbes?" Another "Late Show," another riff from a Letterman monologue. It's the day after the Iowa caucuses, and Dave is ready for a season of political jokery. Same as it ever was. But in election year 1996, the state of political humor is not what it was in the 1960s and '70s, when Dick Gregory, Mort Sahl and Lenny Bruce attacked serious issues with wit; Vaughn Meader and David Frye sold millions of albums by impersonating presidents; and Johnny Carson's nightly monologue was as important to the TV age as Will Rogers' musings were to the Depression Era. "It has to do with the climate of entertainment" today, says Paula Poundstone, who has done comic coverage of the political conventions for "The Tonight Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
After fans have waited for years - some die-hards would say decades - for the cultural phenomenon that is "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," what can one do to sate the appetite for new adventures, which seems as vast and infinite as space itself? One answer: Check out the plethora of comic book adventures coming out every month from Marvel. Star Wars comic books and novels have always been popular, but now that they are being published by Marvel and have the full marketing muscle of Disney behind them, they are dominating comic book shops just as the movies have dominated theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Amazon Queen is put out. Hercules and other warring males are muscling in on her and her gals. "Stupid men!" she spits. "You have no chance against us as long as we wear Aphrodite's magic girdle!" What's amazing about that line is not that a character in a Fringe cast would use it, but that someone else did: It and all the lines in Super Heroes Who Are Super! from Plays & Players come straight from the comics - in this case, the very first Wonder Woman, from 1942. Ten actors, scripts in hand (and in the case of Melissa Lynch, looking great in her red Wonder Woman dress)
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NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Patrick Rapa, For The Inquirer
If you ask Cameron Esposito, seeing your face on a movie screen isn't nearly as thrilling as seeing your name. The Chicago-born, L.A.-based stand-up comic known for her amicably in-your-face style, personal anecdotes, and swooping "side-mullet" has recently started to diversify. She just got back from the Sundance Film Festival, where two films by young directors - J.D. Dillard's Sleight and Kerem Sanga's First Girl I Loved - featured her in supporting roles. "Because of my stand-up stuff, and how much of my career involves promoting yourself as a brand, I see my face a lot," she said in a recent interview while on the ride home from LAX. "But one thing I haven't seen a bunch is my name on a single title card.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2016 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Jerry Lewis, Jim Carrey, Whoopi Goldberg, Adam Sandler, Bill Murray, Eddie Murphy, Kristen Wiig - all comedians who changed their careers with a dramatic turn. As old-time agent Milt "Junior" Karp (Kenny Morris) explains in Bruce Graham's latest, Funnyman , now at the Arden Theatre, "No one takes a comic seriously until they do something serious. " So it is with Chick Sherman (Carl N. Wallnau), who, as a child vaudevillian, was forced by his parents to smoke cigars and dress like a dwarf so they could avoid child-endangerment charges (see: Buster Keaton)
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Bruce Graham's Funnyman opens at the Arden Theatre on Thursday. The lead character, aging vaudeville slapstick comic Chick Sherman, speaks for Graham - Philly's most Philadelphia playwright - when he says, "Nobody takes comics seriously until they do something serious. " Much of Graham's theatrical output engages people, places, and events from his past. North of the Boulevard is a blue-collar affair set in the Darby auto garage his cousin owns. His first play, Burkie (now 35 years old)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
Can Kamala Khan help save the world - or at least help make it more peaceful and understanding? Don't laugh. As fear of Islamic extremists has risen in the United States following recent terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., the first Muslim character in mainstream superhero comics to carry her own title is growing in popularity. Ms. Marvel , the character's alter ego, has been a consistently best-selling title in an increasingly crowded marketplace still dominated by decades-old characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
Just in time for 2016, fans of community, coffee, and comic books will have a new place to visit. Although Philadelphia has a rich tradition of quality comic-book shops - and could brag that Showcase Comics on South Street was the largest black-owned comic shop in the United States for quite some time - Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse will be the first black female-owned comic book shop to open its doors on the East Coast. This "geeky" hybrid hopes to contribute to the burgeoning Kensington section of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Like every kid who's ever wanted to be an astronaut, or an NBA forward, or president, Terry LaBan had a childhood dream that was a long shot: He wanted to become a syndicated cartoonist. "That was my childhood fantasy," said LaBan, cocreator for 15 years with his wife, Patty, of Edge City , a comic about a suburban Jewish American family. "And I got to do it. But I got to do it when everybody stopped paying attention. " On Saturday, Edge City , which The Inquirer had carried since its beginning, will cease to exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
After fans have waited for years - some die-hards would say decades - for the cultural phenomenon that is "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," what can one do to sate the appetite for new adventures, which seems as vast and infinite as space itself? One answer: Check out the plethora of comic book adventures coming out every month from Marvel. Star Wars comic books and novels have always been popular, but now that they are being published by Marvel and have the full marketing muscle of Disney behind them, they are dominating comic book shops just as the movies have dominated theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
David Tischman [who once authored the "Poster Child" feature for the Daily News ] has had a long career in writing comics that spans both work at Vertigo and IDW, but his latest venture is his most personal, ambitious yet - and available only on the web! "Heroine Chic" (art by Hong Kong-based Audrey Mok) is set in a New York populated by superheroes. However, rather than focusing primarily on heroic battles between superpowered characters, Tischman's creation follows the life of fashion designer Zoe Porter, after she lands a job with famous and renowned costume designer Dyna Cuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's not yet the Fifth of November, but Arden Theatre Company still remembers England's Gunpowder Plot, via Bill Cain's 2009 drama Equivocation . Cain, a Jesuit priest, explores the entanglements among Shakespeare - here tagged with an alternate spelling of his name, Shagspeare - King James I, Sir Robert Cecil, and the nature of playwriting, among other topics crammed into a play of Shakespearean proportions. Of course, there's only one Shakespeare (or is there? Cain also winks at that question a few times)
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | Daily News Staff
Whenever a celebrity publicly disses the obnoxious and pampered lives fellow Chosen Ones live, an angel gets its wings. That's what TempTatt would like to believe, anyway, especially when we learned of an upcoming documentary about our new favorite bold-namer, Brit bad boy Russell Brand . Brand, you may recall, is the ex-hubster of hit-making machine Katy Perry . And while the public may think the existence the couple led was a dream,...
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