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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1989 | By John Barbour, Special to the Daily News
Call it a laughter explosion. Ten years ago there were fewer than 20 comedy clubs in the United States. Today there are some 225 of them out there, dedicated to making people laugh for a $10 to $20 cover charge and the price of a drink or two. It's a growth rate of nine clubs a year for the last quarter of a century. And thousands of comics are laughing their way to the bank. They can find work on some 700 stages where comics are featured, not to mention the growing number of comedy shows on television.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rodney Dangerfields of Mummery say that cutting time off their comic performances in the New Year's parade is no laughing matter. Murray Comic Club President Rich Porco says he'll cooperate fully with Mayor Rendell's challenge to speed the parade, but he's tired of Comics getting blamed for delays and rowdiness. "We're stacking people more tightly. We're discouraging conversations with sidewalk fans. We're urging immediate reaction to signals by starters and officers to keep the parade moving," Porco said Monday night as he issued marching orders for his Comic army of 1,900 clowns, wenches and characters.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't tell the kids, but Julius Tarshis, the man who used to make the color plates for the printing of Batman, Superman and other great comic figures, loved the Sistine Chapel. "When he went to Rome, he sat there for four hours looking at the ceiling," said his daughter, Sandra Herbets. "He flipped out - literally -when he went to Europe and Spain. My mother would walk out (of a museum) and come back and he would still be there. " Mr. Tarshis, 87, who studied to be an artist, but who made his living as a photoengraver for comics, died Tuesday at his home in Meadowbrook, near Jenkintown.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
The odds of succeeding as a stand-up comic are pretty small. First, you play in smoky bars for all the food you can eat, then graduate to opening in Chattanooga, Tenn., for a country-and-western act. Then, if you slay 'em on all the college campuses and People magazine does a paragraph-long profile, maybe you get a shot on cable television. Cable has turned into an electronic Borscht Belt for comics who would be big. It's the slippery middle step between local and national fame.
NEWS
May 1, 2001
Can't we have other continuous-plot comics besides "Gil Thorp"? We used to have Mary Worth, Brenda Starr, Dick Tracy, etc. And why is "Gil Thorp" relegated to the back pages? Everyone tears the paper apart looking for it. My kids went through a snowstorm to get the Daily News to see what happened to Gil. MARION VANDERGRIFT, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dana Walrath discovered graphic narratives while her mother, then in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease, was living with her. Her mother's ability to use and understand language was failing, but she devoured such sophisticated illustrated books as Maus and Persepolis that took on, respectively, the Holocaust and growing up in Iran. "She was able to bring the story in through a visual channel," said Walrath, a medical anthropologist at the University of Vermont who earned her doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"The more you drive, the less intelligent you are," theorized Miller, the spaced-out auto mechanic in Repo Man. And now, with Speed Zone - at last count the third film about that yawning cross-country car race, the Cannonball Run - you have irrefutable proof of his theory. A moving violation in more ways than one, Speed Zone stars SCTV alumni John Candy, Eugene Levy and Joe Flaherty as entrants in the unsanctioned road event that is the cinematic equivalent of a demolition derby.
NEWS
August 21, 2011
Stan Wischnowski is the editor of The Inquirer 'You have removed several really good comics. . . . You indicate some can be found online. What if one does not have a computer? You have crammed all the comics onto one page, and puzzles on another. . . . You have changed your editorial pages, which was no improvement. . . . What's going on here?!" These sentiments of a longtime reader are representative of the mail I've been receiving as a result of recent changes in the paper.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
"Doesn't Pat Buchanan look like the kid you went to school with, the one who was always beating up the kid who looked like Steve Forbes?" Another "Late Show," another riff from a Letterman monologue. It's the day after the Iowa caucuses, and Dave is ready for a season of political jokery. Same as it ever was. But in election year 1996, the state of political humor is not what it was in the 1960s and '70s, when Dick Gregory, Mort Sahl and Lenny Bruce attacked serious issues with wit; Vaughn Meader and David Frye sold millions of albums by impersonating presidents; and Johnny Carson's nightly monologue was as important to the TV age as Will Rogers' musings were to the Depression Era. "It has to do with the climate of entertainment" today, says Paula Poundstone, who has done comic coverage of the political conventions for "The Tonight Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
After fans have waited for years - some die-hards would say decades - for the cultural phenomenon that is "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," what can one do to sate the appetite for new adventures, which seems as vast and infinite as space itself? One answer: Check out the plethora of comic book adventures coming out every month from Marvel. Star Wars comic books and novels have always been popular, but now that they are being published by Marvel and have the full marketing muscle of Disney behind them, they are dominating comic book shops just as the movies have dominated theaters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Ask any comic-reading child to name his or her favorite superhero, and the answer may range from Spider-Man to Wonder Woman. Someday, such a child might also name civil rights activist and now comic-book protagonist U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.). The 76-year-old congressman recently released March: Book Three , the final installment of a graphic novel trilogy about his life working for civil rights. The saga takes us through Lewis' life, from growing up in the 1940s on 110 acres of farmland in Pike County, Ala., to his speech at the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
Comic book writer turned best-selling author Brad Meltzer's new book House of Secrets (co-written with Tod Goldberg) was inspired by a seed planted years ago. "I was at the National Archives and they showed me a document that was called an 'Oath of Allegiance,' which is what George Washington used to have his military officers sign," Meltzer told philly.com/ in an exclusive interview. "They handed me an 'Oath of Allegiance' that was signed by Benedict Arnold. " The last moments between George Washington and Benedict Arnold are some of the most heartbreaking in U.S. history," he continued.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
Big City Comics Founder Jeffrey Kaufman is excited about changes in his company's publishing plan-and a unique new offering. "We used to allow other people to publish our books for the last seven years and since we decided to go monthly with single-issue books, it was just silly for us to go through other people," Kaufman said. "So, Big City Comics became its own publisher. We went to Diamond . . . and they were fully satisfied. " "Our model is very clear-publishing with a purpose," Kaufman continued.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
Civil rights icon John Lewis , who's been representing Georgia's 5th congressional district for nearly 30 years, will take part in a pre-release signing of March: Book Three , the latest edition in the award-winning autobiographical graphic novel series by Lewis and his co-writer Andrew Aydin . The event will take place at Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse (2578 Frankford Ave.), on Wednesday, July 27 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm. "We're excited to have Congressman Lewis coming to visit," Amalgam founder Ariell Johnson told Tattle Comics Guy Jerome Maida . "We were contacted by the March publishers at Top Shelf Productions after we were getting press in the fall as an independently focused comic book shop owned by an African-American woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2016 | By Julia M. Klein, For The Inquirer
     Noël Coward's Blithe Spirit is farce with an edge of darkness, a 1941 confection that suggested to wartime Londoners both the enduring bonds between the dead and the living and the trials of matrimony. Even then, the play was something of a throwback, evoking the Victorian fascination with séances and communication with the spirit world.       In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Company's sturdy revival, the writer Charles Condomine (Ian Merrill Peakes), a stand-in for Coward, doesn't at first take any of this seriously: He's just trying to learn enough jargon and "tricks of the trade" to lend authenticity to his latest novel, about a homicidal medium.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Sarah LeBlanc, STAFF WRITER
Comic book legend Stan Lee is about to get personal with a new digital graphic novel. God Woke is a tale of humanity's quest for meaning with a flipped perspective that has God searching for the same, will take readers from Lee's time-honored superhero works and leave them questioning their purpose in life. Reminiscent of philosopher Albert Camus ' theory of the absurd, Lee worked on the project with Deadpool creator Fabian Nicieza . The philosophical God Woke will first be released in print and later as a Cinematic Graphic Novel (CGN)
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Sarah LeBlanc, STAFF WRITER
New Jersey-based Webcomic Factory, an online hub of comic treasures, just launched its 30th webcomic entitled " Scumbag Cop . " Written by Tony DiGerolamo and drawn by Ricardo Enguita Palomar, the comic features a corrupt Philadelphia detective who develops a distortedly positive moral compass after years of abusing his power. "I've been developing this project for a long time," DiGerolamo said in a press release. "It's kind of a film noir, where all the characters are bad, but Trevor Baker is the best person in a mess of bad ones.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
If you have been to a recent Wizard World Philly or are a fan of VH1's Mob Wives , chances are you are familiar with Marissa Jade. Jade's profile looks to get far bigger in the near future, as a character she helped create for a comic book, "Destiny: Queen of Thieves", has just been green lit for a feature film! In an exclusive interview with Daily News Comics Guy, Jade shared how excited she is about the project, how it came to be and why she feels it will be a huge success.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Unleashing anti-Semitism Last weekend, something incredible and frightening occurred: The Republican Party's presumptive nominee for president tweeted a blatantly anti-Semitic meme about Hillary Clinton. The claim that criticisms of the image amounted to "political correctness run amok" are belied by the fact that it was lifted from a white supremacist site ("Trump defends tweet with star," Tuesday). To me, this issue of human decency transcends politics.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Dave Chappelle never just phones it in. The comic is always improvising, said his new friend Graham Dugoni. Fans lucky to score Chappelle tickets for shows Tuesday and Wednesday at the new Punch Line Philly comedy club in Fishtown will be required to do the same, living in the moment by going "phone-free" and concentrating "Yondr" on the talent. For this, all praise and maybe a few curses are due to a Dugoni invention of the same name, Yondr, which Chappelle now uses to protect his routine from getting posted online.
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