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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1989 | By John Barbour, Special to the Daily News
Call it a laughter explosion. Ten years ago there were fewer than 20 comedy clubs in the United States. Today there are some 225 of them out there, dedicated to making people laugh for a $10 to $20 cover charge and the price of a drink or two. It's a growth rate of nine clubs a year for the last quarter of a century. And thousands of comics are laughing their way to the bank. They can find work on some 700 stages where comics are featured, not to mention the growing number of comedy shows on television.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rodney Dangerfields of Mummery say that cutting time off their comic performances in the New Year's parade is no laughing matter. Murray Comic Club President Rich Porco says he'll cooperate fully with Mayor Rendell's challenge to speed the parade, but he's tired of Comics getting blamed for delays and rowdiness. "We're stacking people more tightly. We're discouraging conversations with sidewalk fans. We're urging immediate reaction to signals by starters and officers to keep the parade moving," Porco said Monday night as he issued marching orders for his Comic army of 1,900 clowns, wenches and characters.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't tell the kids, but Julius Tarshis, the man who used to make the color plates for the printing of Batman, Superman and other great comic figures, loved the Sistine Chapel. "When he went to Rome, he sat there for four hours looking at the ceiling," said his daughter, Sandra Herbets. "He flipped out - literally -when he went to Europe and Spain. My mother would walk out (of a museum) and come back and he would still be there. " Mr. Tarshis, 87, who studied to be an artist, but who made his living as a photoengraver for comics, died Tuesday at his home in Meadowbrook, near Jenkintown.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
The odds of succeeding as a stand-up comic are pretty small. First, you play in smoky bars for all the food you can eat, then graduate to opening in Chattanooga, Tenn., for a country-and-western act. Then, if you slay 'em on all the college campuses and People magazine does a paragraph-long profile, maybe you get a shot on cable television. Cable has turned into an electronic Borscht Belt for comics who would be big. It's the slippery middle step between local and national fame.
NEWS
May 1, 2001
Can't we have other continuous-plot comics besides "Gil Thorp"? We used to have Mary Worth, Brenda Starr, Dick Tracy, etc. And why is "Gil Thorp" relegated to the back pages? Everyone tears the paper apart looking for it. My kids went through a snowstorm to get the Daily News to see what happened to Gil. MARION VANDERGRIFT, Philadelphia
NEWS
August 21, 2011
Stan Wischnowski is the editor of The Inquirer 'You have removed several really good comics. . . . You indicate some can be found online. What if one does not have a computer? You have crammed all the comics onto one page, and puzzles on another. . . . You have changed your editorial pages, which was no improvement. . . . What's going on here?!" These sentiments of a longtime reader are representative of the mail I've been receiving as a result of recent changes in the paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"The more you drive, the less intelligent you are," theorized Miller, the spaced-out auto mechanic in Repo Man. And now, with Speed Zone - at last count the third film about that yawning cross-country car race, the Cannonball Run - you have irrefutable proof of his theory. A moving violation in more ways than one, Speed Zone stars SCTV alumni John Candy, Eugene Levy and Joe Flaherty as entrants in the unsanctioned road event that is the cinematic equivalent of a demolition derby.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
"Doesn't Pat Buchanan look like the kid you went to school with, the one who was always beating up the kid who looked like Steve Forbes?" Another "Late Show," another riff from a Letterman monologue. It's the day after the Iowa caucuses, and Dave is ready for a season of political jokery. Same as it ever was. But in election year 1996, the state of political humor is not what it was in the 1960s and '70s, when Dick Gregory, Mort Sahl and Lenny Bruce attacked serious issues with wit; Vaughn Meader and David Frye sold millions of albums by impersonating presidents; and Johnny Carson's nightly monologue was as important to the TV age as Will Rogers' musings were to the Depression Era. "It has to do with the climate of entertainment" today, says Paula Poundstone, who has done comic coverage of the political conventions for "The Tonight Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Amazon Queen is put out. Hercules and other warring males are muscling in on her and her gals. "Stupid men!" she spits. "You have no chance against us as long as we wear Aphrodite's magic girdle!" What's amazing about that line is not that a character in a Fringe cast would use it, but that someone else did: It and all the lines in Super Heroes Who Are Super! from Plays & Players come straight from the comics - in this case, the very first Wonder Woman, from 1942. Ten actors, scripts in hand (and in the case of Melissa Lynch, looking great in her red Wonder Woman dress)
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Artist, author, and retired detective Joe Getsinger says Sally Snickers' pigtails point the way to "the bigger story of the King of Cartoons. " While doing research for a soon-to-be-published book, Getsinger found an early iteration of the distinctive Sally character in a 1930s comic strip by Jack Kirby, later the creator of Captain America, the Fantastic Four, and many more. "Sally helped me connect the dots" between Kirby's formative years and his fame, says Getsinger, who discovered the revelatory images within his collection of about 8,000 printing plates.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
THE CW will add three new shows next season, including "DC's Legends of Tomorrow," drawn from the DC Comics universe of "Arrow" and "The Flash. " Only one new show, "My Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," will premiere this fall. In a conference call with reporters yesterday morning, shortly before presenting his plans to advertisers in New York, CW president Mark Pedowitz described that hourlong comedy, originally a Showtime pilot, as "a perfect companion piece" to "Jane the Virgin," which it will be paired with on Monday nights.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Gretchen Schroeder began attending comic conventions 15 years ago, she appeared out of place in the small crowd of mostly male comic book fans. "I was a single mom bringing daughters to a con, and that was unusual back then," Schroeder, 58, of Philadelphia, said. Times have changed. Comic cons continue to gain popularity and the crowds are diverse, the former school librarian noted Saturday morning as thousands of fans - many dressed in elaborate and colorful costumes - filed into Wizard World Comic Con Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
In the midst of all the crime-fighting superheroes, time-traveling aliens, and walking dead who will populate the 15th annual Wizard World Comic Con this weekend, Burt Reynolds may seem somewhat out of place. But if remaining an icon for more than four decades armed with nothing more than a lady-killing smirk, a machismo-emitting mustache, and a death-defying Trans Am isn't a superpower worthy of Wizard World, then what is? The Convention Center will be filled for the next three days with appearances by a host of pop-culture celebrities, from actors to comic book artists and writers to professional wrestlers to rock stars.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
FOR COMICS writer and historian Danny Fingeroth, coming to Wizard World Comic Con Philly (through Sunday at the Convention Center) is like coming home. "I have a sentimental attachment to Philadelphia," said Fingeroth, who is best known for editing the Spider-Man group of titles for Marvel in the 1990s. "I grew up in New York. If my family wanted to go away for a weekend or a few days, we'd often go to Philadelphia. "I remember the Mummers Parade and just enjoying some old-time Jewish neighborhoods," he continued.
SPORTS
May 7, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
NICK BARRUCCI runs Dynamite Entertainment, one of the world's largest and most respected comic-book companies. He has attracted top talent and compelling licensed and original material. He just launched "Swords of Sorrow," the biggest, most ambitious crossover of iconic female characters ever, told mostly by female creators, led by superstar scribe Gail Simone. But all that is not what has Nick Barrucci the most excited as Wizard Philly Con begins. It's that the spotlight of the pop-culture world is shining once again in his back yard.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jenelle Janci, Daily News Staff Writer
At first glance, Brad Guigar 's entrance to the world of webcomics seems reminiscent of the supervillain characters he creates. In 1999, his comic strip "Greystone Inn" had just been rejected by newspaper syndicates when he devised a new plan. "Although I was about a year behind the curve, I had this idea that I figured nobody else had," said Guigar, who was also a graphic artist for the Daily News at the time. "I'm going to put them up on a website, and I'm going to build a huge following, and then those guys at the syndicate will know what a mistake they made.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Artist, author, and retired detective Joe Getsinger says Sally Snickers' pigtails point the way to "the bigger story of the King of Cartoons. " While doing research for a soon-to-be-published book, Getsinger found an early iteration of the distinctive Sally character in a 1930s comic strip by Jack Kirby, later the creator of Captain America, the Fantastic Four, and many more. "Sally helped me connect the dots" between Kirby's formative years and his fame, says Getsinger, who discovered the revelatory images within his collection of about 8,000 printing plates.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT BROKE Joe Bryson's heart when he couldn't participate in the last New Year's Mummers Parade. As a former captain of the Bryson New Year's Brigade, Joe lived and breathed the exotic culture of Philadelphia Mummery. "New Year's Day was his favorite day," said his daughter, Colleen Judge. "But he was just out of the hospital and the weather was bad. His doctors said he couldn't go. " But Mummers culture is in Bryson blood, and his fellow paraders knew it. So, on the morning of the parade, they gathered outside Joe's house and serenaded him with some favorite Mummer airs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
THE Northeast's own Duane Swierczynski has a special place in the literary canon: He's the first guy to drop an F-bomb in an Archie comic. No, Swierczynski is not sullying the Riverdale gang with foul language. Instead, he's the author of "The Black Hood," the first in Archie's Dark Circle imprint of comics, out on Wednesday. "I'm sure my parents are very proud of that," he said. "If I had known that [milestone] before, I would have had Archie meet Samuel L. Jackson. " "The Black Hood," first created in 1940, centers on a cop who is horrifically wounded in a gunfight, leading him to become a vigilante crusading for his own brand of justice.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
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