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Command Center

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NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A command center for military drones will open this fall at the Horsham Air Guard Base, bringing a controversial instrument of U.S. foreign policy into the Philadelphia area. The ground-control station for the remotely controlled aircraft will open Oct. 1 and be established by the Pennsylvania Air National Guard's 111th Fighter Wing, the Pennsylvania Department of Military and Veterans Affairs announced Monday. It is expected to create about 250 jobs, including 75 full-time positions.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Phillips was excited as a schoolgirl with a snow day. In her case, the glow in her eyes came from the prospect of spending the night in the bowels of the Philadelphia Fire Department's headquarters on Spring Garden Street. If she were lucky, she might even catch a few hours of sleep on her office floor. "This is the part of the job I really enjoy," said Phillips, director of the city's Office of Emergency Management (OEM). "This is where you get to test your concepts, to test your plans.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void. The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials. "We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A command center for military drones will open this fall at the Horsham Air Guard Base, bringing a controversial instrument of U.S. foreign policy into the Philadelphia area. The ground-control station for the remotely controlled aircraft will open Oct. 1 and be established by the Pennsylvania Air National Guard's 111th Fighter Wing, the Pennsylvania Department of Military and Veterans Affairs announced Monday. It is expected to create about 250 jobs, including 75 full-time positions.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
On Friday, I went on a tour of AT&T Inc.'s Philadelphia "command center," a rare peek inside a secure facility that handles a terabit of information every second. It was a way for local AT&T managers to show how the telecommunications company plans to spend $19 billion nationwide on its wireless and wireline networks and other capital projects in 2011. On Sunday, Dallas-based AT&T showed another way that it hopes to spend its capital: It intends to buy T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom AG for $39 billion in a cash-and-stock transaction.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The new year will bring a new vehicle to Gloucester County. Not just any vehicle, though, but a sophisticated, high-tech $198,000 command center - called Field Comm1 - that can serve as headquarters during major emergencies in the county. As part of a six-year plan, the county bought the field command center in 1996. It will replace the 28-foot-long vehicle the county has been using since 1982, and which used to belong to the Whitman Fire Company in Washington Township. Once the new Field Comm1 is painted, it will be stand ready for emergencies.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing at the altar before 100 parishioners attending morning Mass, Msgr. Martin Geraghty had just begun his blessing of the Communion host and wine when he heard a boom and felt the brick church in Belle Harbor rattle. The noise was overpowering. He paused, looking down at the faces of the men and women in church who stared back at him with the same look of fear that he felt inside. "I hope that wasn't a terrorist attack," he thought. His parish of 1,800 families in this neighborhood sandwiched between the Atlantic Ocean and Jamaica Bay already lost a dozen people on Sept.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Armstrong goes inside AT&T's Philadelphia command center. C1.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - It's one thing to have watched the World Trade Center collapse on television, gaping as the huge ash cloud swirled down the street. It's quite another to have been there, and then trampled and nearly suffocated trying to outrun the debris. That was the thought that crossed Jim Jenca's mind last week as he wandered through the National September 11 Memorial Museum during a special opening for survivors and victims' families. It's not that he felt unmoved by the onslaught of videos and artifacts, or the photographs of dead friends, the Levittown resident explained, "but in a strange way, I realized, it's something I'd already seen.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The soldiers in the doomsday bunker are headed for the day shift. The Pentagon announced yesterday that the Alternate National Military Command Center, a huge post buried inside Raven Rock Mountain near the Pennsylvania-Maryland border, is going off its 24-hour alert and on to "a normal week-day schedule. " The center served throughout the Cold War as a backup Pentagon, where commanders were to gather if Washington were destroyed in a nuclear war. Visitors to the secret post, just off the Appalachian Trail northwest of Camp David, Md., say it is a subterranean city with streets and electric cars, fresh-water reservoirs, tons of freeze-dried food and hundreds of soldiers.
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NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
WHITE HORSE, Pa. - The schoolhouse was ripped to pieces. The group of local residents who had gathered at the site - fewer than 90 minutes after an unprecedented tornado had rained destruction along a five-mile path - were "dealing with the shock," recalled John Smucker, the secretary of the White Hall School board and the father of four students. On the site they found two seesaws, a green swing set rusted with age, and a small stucco-walled bathroom. Nearby lay the leveled Amish school.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE praise the Lord with prayer and exhortation; Wilbur Mack did it with his voice. That powerful bass-baritone reached the roof of the Grace Baptist Church of Germantown, and thrilled the parishioners gathered in their pews for Sunday worship for more than 50 years. "He loved praising God with his voice," his family said. Wilbur E. Mack, a trustee emeritus of Grace Baptist, a longtime federal government executive, Army veteran of World War II, and devoted family man, died July 30. He was 92. He was born in Greenville, S.C., and even as a war veteran had to endure the pervasive racism of the segregated South.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Phillips was excited as a schoolgirl with a snow day. In her case, the glow in her eyes came from the prospect of spending the night in the bowels of the Philadelphia Fire Department's headquarters on Spring Garden Street. If she were lucky, she might even catch a few hours of sleep on her office floor. "This is the part of the job I really enjoy," said Phillips, director of the city's Office of Emergency Management (OEM). "This is where you get to test your concepts, to test your plans.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - It's one thing to have watched the World Trade Center collapse on television, gaping as the huge ash cloud swirled down the street. It's quite another to have been there, and then trampled and nearly suffocated trying to outrun the debris. That was the thought that crossed Jim Jenca's mind last week as he wandered through the National September 11 Memorial Museum during a special opening for survivors and victims' families. It's not that he felt unmoved by the onslaught of videos and artifacts, or the photographs of dead friends, the Levittown resident explained, "but in a strange way, I realized, it's something I'd already seen.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Viola isn't exactly what one would call well-rested. "See the bags under my eyes?" the deputy chief of Haverford Township's police force said, laughing. "We're operating on under 31/2 hours of sleep a day. " Viola is in charge of the security command center at the U.S. Open, overseeing teams from the FBI, the Pennsylvania State Police, the local fire department, and scores of local police forces - all working to make sure nothing goes wrong at an event that has been drawing tens of thousands daily to the Merion Golf Club.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the U.S. Open coming to the Merion Golf Club in less than five weeks, public safety officials are more worried about road congestion and lost drivers than crime or terrorism. "Our biggest concern is traffic," said Haverford Township Deputy Police Chief John Viola. "If we have traffic issues, it ties everything up and then it becomes a security issue on top of that. " The township, home to the club hosting the tournament June 10-16, has published road closures and detours, and held town hall meetings to answer residents' questions.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Julhas Alam, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - With time running out to save workers still trapped in a collapsed garment factory building, rescuers dug through mangled metal and concrete Friday and found more survivors - but also more corpses that pushed the death toll past 300. Wailing, angry relatives fought with police who held them back from the wrecked, eight-story Rana Plaza building, as search-and-rescue operations went on more than two days after the structure crumbled....
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void. The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials. "We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void. The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials. "We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.
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