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Commemorative Coins

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stevie Wonder gave an electrifying performance in New York's Central Park before thousands of fans and several world leaders Saturday, singing hits and calling for an end to poverty at the Global Citizen Festival. After a rousing intro by Bono , he wowed the audiences at the second annual event; last year's featured Neil Young and Crazy Horse , the Foo Fighters, and the Black Keys and drew pledges of $1.3 billion. The festival, which coincides with the U.N. General Assembly, was attended by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf . Performers included Kings of Leon and Alicia Keys , who said, "I believe if we don't care about each other, who will?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
The appearance in April of the Library of Congress commemorative coins, for all the organized celebration and media attention, scarcely caused collectors to miss a beat in their pursuit of the new state quarters. While the Mint can barely produce quarters fast enough to satisfy orders, much less circulation demands, its commemorative program has slogged along, rarely meeting sales projections, and sometimes even losing money. The difference lies in the almost universal boosterism stirred by the state quarters, as opposed to the narrowly specific interests behind many of the commemorative coins.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
The 500th anniversary of Columbus' first voyage is expected to produce a new field of collecting. Most Western nations are planning to issue commemorative coins. The U.S. Mint is among those poised to act to commemorate the 1492 expedition. A bill is already under consideration in Congress to strike three coins - $5 gold, silver dollar and silver-clad half dollar - with different designs in 1991 and 1992. The legislation, introduced by Rep. Frank Annunzio (D., Ill.), departs from usual coinage bills in that it would create a foundation to use the income from the coins' surcharges.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
The constitutional bicentennial commemorative coins are among the finalists in the annual coin-of-the-year competition. The $5 gold coin has been voted most historically significant, and the silver dollar the most popular in preliminary balloting, which has narrowed the final vote to six coins worldwide. Other finalists are the British 100-pound Britannia, voted best gold coin and most artistic; Canada's Davis Strait commemorative dollar, best silver coin; the Cook Islands' $50 Olympic commemorative, best crown, and the Swiss Corbusier 5-franc coin, best trade coin.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MAYOR NUTTER returned from Rome more optimistic about a papal visit to the City of Brotherly Love than he was before he left - indicating Philadelphia may very well see a visit from Pope Francis for the World Meeting of Families in September 2015. The mayor met with members of the press yesterday afternoon at City Hall to discuss his visit, saying he felt assured he and the Philadelphia delegation had been well-received during their nearly weeklong trip to Vatican City. The local delegation included Nutter's chief of staff Everett Gillison, Gov. Corbett and Archbishop Charles Chaput.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
When Stack's holds its auction Wednesday and Thursday, in connection with the Greater New York Numismatic Convention, it will offer 107 lots of commemorative silver in a sale - that should help establish current values in that volatile field. The commemorative coins, owned by a collector whose name is not being divulged, have not been seen publicly in more than 50 years. Norman Stack, the owner of the auction house, said "this collection has been kept in one family. More than 90 percent of the coins were purchased from the issuing commission, and come with the original packaging.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Queen Elizabeth's 50-year reign is to be celebrated throughout 2002, and the British Royal Mint intends to offer the first salute with a newly designed five-pound crown, available in January. The mint says the coin, struck in cupro-nickel, will first be sold as part of the 2002 proof set, then individually in the uncirculated golden jubilee presentation folder. Gold and silver proof coins will be struck after that. Ian Rank-Broadley won competitions for both obverse and reverse designs.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY PETER MUCHA, Philly.com pmucha@phillynews.com, 215-854-4342
IT WAS A MOB SCENE, though a somewhat orderly one, twice yesterday at the U.S. Mint on Independence Mall. Starting at noon, hundreds of people, almost all of them working for private coin dealers, were waiting to go into the gift shop, 10 at a time, to purchase a 50th-anniversary commemorative Kennedy half-dollar made of ".9999 fine, 24-karat gold," according to the Mint. Before they reached the registers, though, each person found two men waiting to pass along a white envelope containing cash or credit cards worth $1,240, the cost of the coin.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
Canada's 1992 commemorative coins will celebrate the 350th anniversary of the founding of Montreal and the first stagecoach service between Kingston and York (present-day Toronto), established in 1817. The Royal Canadian Mint will strike a gold proof coin containing 1/4 ounce of gold to mark Montreal's founding. The obverse shows Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve, the French soldier whose expedition to Canada was designed to take Christianity to the New World. He holds plans for Fort Ville-Marie; the skyline of present-day Montreal is in the background.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
Museums have joined a trend in this decade of selling off collections of coins. The investment market has been behind the decision, in most cases. Another museum collection - the museum unnamed - will be sold this week in New York City. Stack's will sell at auction 693 lots of coins from a New England museum, including an extensive gathering of colonial pieces, Tuesday through Friday at the Omni Park Central Hotel, Seventh Avenue at 56th Street, New York City. One of the stars of that sale will be the 1792 half disme, in virtually pristine condition.
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NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY PETER MUCHA, Philly.com pmucha@phillynews.com, 215-854-4342
IT WAS A MOB SCENE, though a somewhat orderly one, twice yesterday at the U.S. Mint on Independence Mall. Starting at noon, hundreds of people, almost all of them working for private coin dealers, were waiting to go into the gift shop, 10 at a time, to purchase a 50th-anniversary commemorative Kennedy half-dollar made of ".9999 fine, 24-karat gold," according to the Mint. Before they reached the registers, though, each person found two men waiting to pass along a white envelope containing cash or credit cards worth $1,240, the cost of the coin.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MAYOR NUTTER returned from Rome more optimistic about a papal visit to the City of Brotherly Love than he was before he left - indicating Philadelphia may very well see a visit from Pope Francis for the World Meeting of Families in September 2015. The mayor met with members of the press yesterday afternoon at City Hall to discuss his visit, saying he felt assured he and the Philadelphia delegation had been well-received during their nearly weeklong trip to Vatican City. The local delegation included Nutter's chief of staff Everett Gillison, Gov. Corbett and Archbishop Charles Chaput.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stevie Wonder gave an electrifying performance in New York's Central Park before thousands of fans and several world leaders Saturday, singing hits and calling for an end to poverty at the Global Citizen Festival. After a rousing intro by Bono , he wowed the audiences at the second annual event; last year's featured Neil Young and Crazy Horse , the Foo Fighters, and the Black Keys and drew pledges of $1.3 billion. The festival, which coincides with the U.N. General Assembly, was attended by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf . Performers included Kings of Leon and Alicia Keys , who said, "I believe if we don't care about each other, who will?
SPORTS
September 6, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
WHEN 23-YEAR-OLD Wayne Hardin got into coaching in 1950, he did it for one simple reason. And over a career that spanned the next three decades-plus, his motive never changed. "I wanted to help kids," he said. "Every place I went, every time I moved when I was growing up, which was a lot, there was always a coach, always a guy that settled me in, [would] teach me things, let me know what life was all about. I've never forgotten that. "So when I went into the business, I didn't do it to win games, go in the Hall of Fame, get publicity or anything else.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | BY ALLISON CAREN, Daily News Staff Writer
TRUTH BE told, a lot of the important historic stuff on Independence Mall doesn't exactly fill visitors with wonder and awe. Free Quaker Meeting House, anyone? Don't even get us started on the President's House. Perhaps that's why, amid a collection of sites that can sometimes feel like homework, the U.S. Mint gets so little love. Though Philly can boast the country's first mint, opened in 1792 (back then it was at 7th and Arch), the Mint building looks about as interesting as a suburban office park.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
U.S. Rep. Bob Brady (D., Pa.), has introduced a bill that would allow the U.S. Mint to design and sell a commemorative coin honoring the cruiser Olympia. Proceeds would go toward efforts to preserve the ship as a museum, Brady's office announced Friday. The Olympia, berthed at Penn's Landing, is a National Historic Landmark. It was the flagship of Commodore George Dewey in his 1898 victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War. - Inquirer staff
NEWS
January 30, 2004 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Coin grading is the reef on which many dreams of wealth founder. The intriguing old coin found in Grandpa's desk turns out to be worth peanuts because it is graded low by dealers. Grading is the single most controversial aspect of collecting because, even after microscopic examination, two specialists can come up with different grading numbers for a coin. Professional grading services, which were born and expanded during the 1990s, have made grading quicker, more standardized, and a little less subjective.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Queen Elizabeth's 50-year reign is to be celebrated throughout 2002, and the British Royal Mint intends to offer the first salute with a newly designed five-pound crown, available in January. The mint says the coin, struck in cupro-nickel, will first be sold as part of the 2002 proof set, then individually in the uncirculated golden jubilee presentation folder. Gold and silver proof coins will be struck after that. Ian Rank-Broadley won competitions for both obverse and reverse designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
The appearance in April of the Library of Congress commemorative coins, for all the organized celebration and media attention, scarcely caused collectors to miss a beat in their pursuit of the new state quarters. While the Mint can barely produce quarters fast enough to satisfy orders, much less circulation demands, its commemorative program has slogged along, rarely meeting sales projections, and sometimes even losing money. The difference lies in the almost universal boosterism stirred by the state quarters, as opposed to the narrowly specific interests behind many of the commemorative coins.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1999 | By Mike Hudson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Millions of gleaming new Connecticut commemorative quarters began pouring into circulation yesterday, exciting a huge new generation of coin collectors and promising a multibillion-dollar bonanza for the U.S. Treasury. Though the U.S. mints in Philadelphia and Denver will churn out 750 million quarters featuring Connecticut's ancient charter oak - that is about three for every man, woman and child in the United States - the public can't seem to get enough of them. "The first five quarters have each been greeted with tremendous excitement from the public," said Philip N. Diehl, the director of the mint, noting that demand for quarters has doubled, from two billion last year to four billion this year.
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