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Commencement Speech

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SPORTS
May 17, 2011 | Associated Press
Eagles quarterback Michael Vick will address graduates of the Camelot schools, an alternative high school program in Philadelphia that serves at-risk youth. Vick will speak to about 450 graduates at a ceremony at the Kimmel Center. Camelot CEO Todd Bock said yesterday that the date of the graduation would not be disclosed because he wants to discourage protesters. Bock said he expects Vick's life story and his perseverance through adversity to resonate with students. Vick pleaded guilty to federal charges in August of 2007 and served 18 months in prison for his role in a dogfighting ring.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. - the signature shortstop who played 95 straight games without making an error and was so durable and committed that he broke Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played - finds these days "a bit nerve-racking. " So much so, he confesses he's not sleeping well. This from a man who for years came through in the clutch in stadiums filled with tens of thousands of sometimes unforgiving fans. All eyes will be trained on the Iron Man again tomorrow when he delivers a commencement speech at the University of Delaware, his first.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neil Gaiman returned to the scene Tuesday night. "UArts gave me something cool," he says, "and I wanted to give them something, too. " A year ago, Gaiman, an award-winning writer of graphic novels ( Sandman ), books ( American Gods ), and movies, gave a commencement speech for the University of the Arts graduating students of 2012. "I didn't know commencement speeches were meant to be dull and interminable," he says by phone, minutes after doing a Talk of the Nation interview at the WHYY studios.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
I CAN'T TELL you how relieved I am at the fact that Lynne Abraham has told us that the killer of Officer Gary Skerski will face the death penalty. Now we can look forward in 20 years to his commencement speech at some liberal college. Mumia revisited. Ron Stokes Philadelphia
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mumia Abu-Jamal is back in prison after being hospitalized this week for treatment of diabetes. Abu-Jamal, 60, who is serving a life sentence for killing a Philadelphia police officer in 1981, returned to State Correctional Institution-Mahanoy on Wednesday night after two days in intensive care, said Johanna Fernandez, one of his supporters. His blood-sugar level remains high; Fernandez said it was 336 on Friday afternoon when he was last tested at the prison's infirmary. Any reading above 186 is considered dangerous.
NEWS
August 16, 1991
A WORLD OF DISCRIMINATION That mean, callous world out there is still very much filled with discrimination. It holds out a different life for those who do not happen to be the right race or the right sex. It is a world in which the haves continue to reap more dividends than the have-nots. - Clarence Thomas, commencement speech, Savannah State College, June 9,1985
NEWS
May 3, 2004
HOW IRONIC is it that my education started with watching Big Bird on "Sesame Street" and will now end with Big Bird delivering my commencement speech. I am honored to have someone like Carroll Spinny, who has spent a majority of his career educating youth through characters such as Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch, to deliver the speech. It is only fitting that he speaks to students he has impacted. Penn can have Bono - I'd rather have Big Bird. Diane Pesavento, Class of 2004 Villanova University
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Just a few feet from the site where Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner was gunned down by Mumia Abu-Jamal in 1981, Gov. Corbett on Tuesday signed into law a bill that would aim to stop former offenders from causing victims mental anguish. With Faulkner's widow, Maureen, at his side Corbett said the law was not just about one particular killer. Instead, he gave his rationale for signing what is called the Revictimization Relief Act. "Over the years we've heard much about the constitutional rights of prison inmates, when the focus should be on victims," Corbett said.
NEWS
June 5, 2003
The danger . . . that comes when we have an enemy does not create friendship; it creates comradeship. . . . In friendship there is a deepening of our sense of self. . . . Friends probe and question and challenge each other to make each of us more complete; with comradeship, the kind that comes to us in patriotic fervor, there is a suppression of self-awareness, self-knowledge, and self-possession. Comrades lose their identities in wartime for the collective rush of a common cause . . . . In comradeship there are no demands on the self.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
She infiltrated a Playboy Club in the early '60s. She co-founded two successful magazines, New York and Ms. She led the feminist movement into maturity. And when the outspoken and charismatic Gloria Steinem delivered the commencement speech to the Baldwin School's 100th graduating class on Friday it seemed only fitting. Many of the same underlying beliefs espoused by Steinem were espoused a century ago by the founder of the girls' school in Bryn Mawr. During a wide-ranging commencement speech at Bryn Mawr College, entitled "What I Know Now That I Didn't Know Then," Steinem offered her thoughts on marriage, education and politics as she walked the audience of approximately 500 back through time.
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NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mumia Abu-Jamal is back in prison after being hospitalized this week for treatment of diabetes. Abu-Jamal, 60, who is serving a life sentence for killing a Philadelphia police officer in 1981, returned to State Correctional Institution-Mahanoy on Wednesday night after two days in intensive care, said Johanna Fernandez, one of his supporters. His blood-sugar level remains high; Fernandez said it was 336 on Friday afternoon when he was last tested at the prison's infirmary. Any reading above 186 is considered dangerous.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Just a few feet from the site where Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner was gunned down by Mumia Abu-Jamal in 1981, Gov. Corbett on Tuesday signed into law a bill that would aim to stop former offenders from causing victims mental anguish. With Faulkner's widow, Maureen, at his side Corbett said the law was not just about one particular killer. Instead, he gave his rationale for signing what is called the Revictimization Relief Act. "Over the years we've heard much about the constitutional rights of prison inmates, when the focus should be on victims," Corbett said.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAVERFORD Leafy Haverford College suddenly finds it has a commencement-speaker controversy, too - and less than 10 days to sort things out. It started when the college invited Robert J. Birgeneau, former chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, to speak and receive an honorary degree at the May 18 ceremony. Birgeneau is known for his support of undocumented and minority students, but became controversial in 2011 when university police used force on students protesting the financial handling of the state's higher education system.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University's president called former football player Eric LeGrand on Tuesday to apologize for what the university described as a miscommunication that led LeGrand to believe he had been picked as the school's keynote commencement speaker and then had his invitation rescinded. The school said it had "resolved that miscommunication," and LeGrand will be one of the speakers at the ceremony May 18 in New Brunswick, N.J. "This was an honest mistake on their part," LeGrand wrote in a statement, "and I am thrilled that I will be joining Gov. Tom Kean as a speaker at the commencement.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - President Obama, in a soaring commencement address on work, sacrifice and opportunity, told graduates of historically black Morehouse College yesterday to seize the power of their example as black men graduating from college and use it to improve people's lives. The president said his success was due to "the special obligation I felt, as a black man like you, to help those who need it most, people who didn't have the opportunities that I had - because there but for the grace of God, go I. I might have been in their shoes.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neil Gaiman returned to the scene Tuesday night. "UArts gave me something cool," he says, "and I wanted to give them something, too. " A year ago, Gaiman, an award-winning writer of graphic novels ( Sandman ), books ( American Gods ), and movies, gave a commencement speech for the University of the Arts graduating students of 2012. "I didn't know commencement speeches were meant to be dull and interminable," he says by phone, minutes after doing a Talk of the Nation interview at the WHYY studios.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Dana Milbank
The current issue of Newsweek has a photo of President Obama with a rainbow halo superimposed over his head and the title "The First Gay President. " Nonsense. Obama is the first female president. Consider his activities this week: He sat down to tape a session with the ladies of ABC's The View — his fourth appearance on the show by women and for (mostly) women. He accepted an award from Barnard College and gave the commencement speech at the women's school. Heck, he even appeared in public wearing a gown.
SPORTS
May 17, 2011 | Associated Press
Eagles quarterback Michael Vick will address graduates of the Camelot schools, an alternative high school program in Philadelphia that serves at-risk youth. Vick will speak to about 450 graduates at a ceremony at the Kimmel Center. Camelot CEO Todd Bock said yesterday that the date of the graduation would not be disclosed because he wants to discourage protesters. Bock said he expects Vick's life story and his perseverance through adversity to resonate with students. Vick pleaded guilty to federal charges in August of 2007 and served 18 months in prison for his role in a dogfighting ring.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama delivered his back-to-school speech at the city's highest-performing school Tuesday, exhorting students to strive for excellence and telling them the country's future depends on their efforts. Students, teachers, and even Philadelphia School District administrators snapped photos, applauded wildly, and craned their necks to get a better view of the president, who stood against a blue-and-white backdrop on the stage of the Masterman School, the elite magnet at 17th and Spring Garden Streets.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. - the signature shortstop who played 95 straight games without making an error and was so durable and committed that he broke Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played - finds these days "a bit nerve-racking. " So much so, he confesses he's not sleeping well. This from a man who for years came through in the clutch in stadiums filled with tens of thousands of sometimes unforgiving fans. All eyes will be trained on the Iron Man again tomorrow when he delivers a commencement speech at the University of Delaware, his first.
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