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NEWS
June 11, 2009
FATIMAH Ali's condemnation of the "Deadbeat Dads" TV show required courage and her personal experiences lend her views credibility. The show's unacceptability lies in the way it targets a single demographic group - divorced fathers - and offers a portrait in which all group members commit crimes. This is repugnant stereotyping. "Bridezilla" pokes fun at members of a specific class, but doesn't present them as candidates for incarceration. A program called "Mothers Who Abuse and Neglect Their Kids" could never appear.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
COMMENTARY
SPORTS
October 3, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
COMMENTARY | BY BOB FORD
SPORTS
December 25, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
COMMENTARY | BY BOB FORD
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
What comes after the Arab Spring? Commentary by Trudy Rubin, A2.
NEWS
May 11, 1999
In Larry Atkins' Sunday commentary on the basketball playoffs, Philadelphia 76ers guard Larry Hughes was misidentified.
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NEWS
August 19, 2016
By Noah Feldman It's never the wrongdoing - it's the lying about it. Former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who announced her resignation Tuesday in the face of a possible 14-year sentence for her conviction on perjury charges, proves the truth of that adage for public corruption cases. Leaking grand jury proceedings to embarrass a political rival would not have gotten her sent to prison. But lying about it under oath could and will. How could a state's top law-enforcement official be so dumb?
NEWS
August 19, 2016
By Desmond Lachman In assessing U.S. economic prospects beyond November's election, it bears emphasizing how precarious the state of the global economy appears to be. While the U.S. economy might be reasonably healthy, the rest of the world is decidedly not. This would underline the need for steady U.S. world economic leadership. It would also argue strongly against any U.S. action that might hasten the move to beggar-thy-neighbor policies around the world that would be detrimental to both U.S. and global economic prosperity.
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Daylin Leach
By Daylin Leach Over the past few days, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has repeatedly claimed that if he does not win the presidency this November, it will be because the election was "rigged" or "fixed. " (Presumably, this means that if he wins, we will know the election was clean.) Trump went further with regard to our own commonwealth. He told supporters at an Erie rally that he's sure Pennsylvania's election will be rigged, and that people from "certain parts of the state" will each vote "five or ten times.
NEWS
August 19, 2016
By Siobhan A. Reardon and Jenny Bogoni With the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia last month and the presidential debates around the corner, many of the country's most important issues are at the forefront of our public consciousness. In Philadelphia, where more than one in three children are living below the federal poverty level, and more than half of third graders cannot read on grade level, the issues surrounding childhood literacy and creating opportunities for our youth have never been more important.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Cynthia M. Allen The headlines the morning of July 26 were grim, as they are too often these days. The Rev. Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was murdered at the altar while saying Mass in a church in Rouen, France. His assailants, two teenage males armed with knives, reportedly declared their allegiance to the Islamic State before slaughtering him beneath the crucifix. As he lay dying, he is said to have whispered, "Go away, Satan," to the teens, whose actions were motivated by hatred.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Michael Gerson People always remember their first presidential vote - their first participation in the largest decision of American democracy. In high school, I was a rather awkward, nerdish history buff. (My wife would dispute the verb tense.) I was also something of a lefty, particularly compared with my conservative religious upbringing. I debated on behalf of Jimmy Carter in the mock election at my Christian high school during the 1980 election, making me a political minority of one. But my political identification had begun to shift by 1984, and I cast my first presidential vote for Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Mario Moussa and Derek Newberry Hillary Clinton and her seasoned campaign team secured the nomination at the Democratic National Convention, but she is going to need a team of teams to defeat Donald Trump in November. A team of teams is how Gen. Stanley McChrystal described the military's Joint Special Operations Command during their battle against al-Qaeda in Iraq. McChrystal quickly realized he was fighting a nontraditional enemy in an environment characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Steve Welch Dear Middle-Class Voters, We're sorry we have lied to you. We have known for some time that free trade, while great for the world long term, would harm you dearly in the short term. We knew it would depress your earnings. My Democratic counterparts fought it. Not that they disagreed with me, but their campaigns were funded by labor. We have lied to you for 30 years about immigration, but gosh darn it, you stopped having enough children, and if the population is not growing, all hell breaks loose.
NEWS
August 17, 2016
By Sheena C. Howard During the Democratic convention, Philadelphia cleaned up nice. I cannot remember the last time I saw the subway scrubbed of graffiti, the walls painted, or the sidewalks of South Philadelphia cleansed of garbage. I understand the general sentiment. When people come to visit, you clean up your home. Yet, on the streets, residents scoffed at the makeover, wondering why the city seems to put little effort in cleaning up year-round, particularly in neighborhoods that have yet to be touched by gentrification.
NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll During summers at our house on the coast of Maine, I occasionally drift into thinking about something thematic in my life, and this summer that turned out to be gratitude. For me, this gratitude has a double life. The first is from my 1925 birth until Dec. 15, 1944. The second is from Dec. 16, 1944, until the current moment of this, my 91st year. That initial span of gratitude is rooted in my ever-loving family of great-hearted parents, an older brother and two younger sisters, and so much of value they contributed to my growth every day of that life.
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