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BUSINESS
October 25, 1996 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The bright lights of Manayunk are likely to get brighter still with City Council passage yesterday of a bill that will establish a special services district there. These districts are all the rage now, enabling commercial areas to tax themselves and use the money for enhanced security, street cleaning and promotion. Indeed, Philadelphia has five districts in various stages of development, from the pace-setting Center City District to Germantown, Frankford, South Street and City Avenue.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Before Monday it would have been anyone's guess as to how many new housing units would be needed in Marple Township over the next 20 years. But during the first public information meeting on what can be expected for the future development of the township, the number was set at 1,500. That number was one of many figures and projections presented Monday night by planners with Norman Day Associates, the Philadelphia planning and urban design firm that is preparing the township's comprehensive land-use plan for the next two decades.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Ardmore Business Association has hired a "Main Street" manager as part of township-community efforts to revive the flagging Ardmore business district along Lancaster Avenue. Kathryn Gordon, a Philadelphia management consultant and public administrator for more than 20 years, will help implement an ambitious plan to spruce up the district, create a better mix of businesses and attract more shoppers. "Primarily, the job of the Main Street manager is to help promote the business district and to bring the community to again identify with shopping in the business district," said Gordon, who was chosen from among eight finalists for the job. Before taking this job she worked three years as director of a small health care center for stroke victims in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Commissioners voted yesterday to apply to the state Department of Community Affairs for a Main Street Manager grant, which would help implement a township-wide plan to revitalize key commercial districts. The Main Street manager would oversee the implementation of the economic- development plan, which was formulated by a committee of residents. Unlike most towns involved in the Main Street Manager grant program - which are typically smaller - Abington does not intend to focus on one central business area but has instead focused on five commercial areas.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For as long as anyone can remember, the large Victorian house on the corner had been the home of the Finger family. Then new owners bought it in 1993 and wanted to convert it into an adult day-care facility. Trevose residents were not about to sit by quietly as the residential zoning in their neighborhood was rolled back. For months on end, they gathered signatures and sternly lectured the Bensalem Township Council on the importance of preserving the character of their neighborhood.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Frankford resident Dori Ann Piatkowski would love to do more Christmas shopping in her own neighborhood. Unfortunately, the 33-year-old mother of three finds there aren't a lot of choices. So Franklin Mills is her usual Christmas shopping destination, but if Frankford Avenue "had a Toys R Us and some outlet stores, I'd be shopping around here all the time," she said. "I live two blocks away. " Big discount stores and enclosed shopping malls - that's what the neighborhood merchant is up against, not only during the holiday season but throughout the year.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
DeKalb Street north of Marshall Street and south of Jacoby Street is a war zone. But the battle is not being waged by drug dealers and police officers. Instead, the warriors are the zoning and planing committee, the Borough Council, area residents and property owners, and the fight is over a color- coded map in Borough Hall. The three-block stretch along northbound Route 202 is zoned town residential, despite that fact that it is dominated by the sprawling Super Thriftway market and dotted with a Chinese take-out restaurant, a pharmacy, and various lawyers' and doctors' offices - most of which opened before Norristown instituted zoning.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
In the continuing effort to close the gaps in the township's zoning code, the Upper Providence Township Planning Commission has introduced a "General Regulation Ordinance" that addresses the finer points of municipal land-use control. Several provisions of the new ordinance could affect ongoing controversies in the township - chief among which is the frequent tension between residents and business owners in abutting residential and commercial areas - by subjecting areas to tighter control.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | By Dan Lovely, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration yesterday announced a neighborhood-by-neighborhood timetable for mandatory trash recycling and said a new trash-cop unit may hand out tickets to residents who don't cooperate. "We're going to expect more of ourselves, but we are going to expect more of you, the citizen," Streets Commissioner Alexander Hoskins said in announcing his "Agenda for a Clean Philadelphia. " The three-year plan calls for urging residents to clean their own sidewalks and for more city regulation of commercial pickups.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the nine skate rats parked inside the Blue Turtle skate shop in Cheltenham Village Monday afternoon, the issue wasn't public safety. It was persecution. The next night, the township Board of C ommissioners were to consider an ordinance to ban skateboards from all streets and sidewalks in commercial areas - a move that Cheltenham officials have said started with neighbors' concerns that kids gathering outside the skate shop were flirting with peril in the heavily traveled area.
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NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ink on Philadelphia's zoning reform has barely dried, but Council nonetheless held an epic committee hearing Tuesday to debate changes to a code that took four years to write. One of the proposals would return to the old standards under which businesses and other uses are permissible in neighborhood commercial districts - reversing an effort to conform the code to new-urbanism ideals of walkable, dense neighborhoods. Another would change some of the requirements for notifying and seeking input from neighbors and community groups on proposed developments.
NEWS
June 25, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surveillance cameras should be placed at all major commercial arteries and police powers at city housing projects will be expanded, Camden City Council decided last night. Officials believe this will reduce crime in a city with a per-capita murder rate nearly twice that of Philadelphia's. But skeptics worry that the new police tools, both approved unanimously, could be abused. The first measure is a resolution supporting a $2.5 million program called Eyes in the Sky, which would put "highly visible" closed-circuit TV cameras along six major commercial corridors: Broadway, Mount Ephraim Avenue, Federal Street, Haddon Avenue, Westfield Avenue and Yorkship Square.
NEWS
October 26, 2001 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Washington-based Republican group is spending $400,000 on television ads that will begin airing today on behalf of four South Jersey state senators seeking reelection. It is the first installment of campaign cash that the Republican Leadership Council plans to pour into this year's fight for control of the New Jersey Legislature. The first wave of ads, which will run on Philadelphia network affiliates, will promote the legislative records of Sens. James Cafiero, Raymond Zane, John Matheussen and Diane Allen.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Despite concerns over property tax revenue, the Pemberton Township Council has approved the preservation of a farm in the most commercially valuable section of the township. The approval comes at a time when township leaders are actively seeking to raise revenue from property taxes in the township - about 90 percent of which lies inside of the development-restricted Pinelands - by encouraging new commercial ventures. The 74.26-acre Wolfe farm, on North Pemberton Road, is the fourth farm that the Township Council has approved for participation in the state's Farmland Preservation Program, largely paid for by the $1 billion Garden State Preservation Trust Act signed last year.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Nicole Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some real estate agents say the township's proposal to limit commercial development along Route 322 by changing the zoning to residential could be costly for property owners. "The property is worth a lot more to the seller commercially than it is residentially," said Charles Ambrose, an agent for 23 years who is trying to sell 2.48 acres for a client in the township. "I think [the change] would decrease the value of the property. " The ordinance would limit commercial development along Route 322 by changing the zoning designation from "highway commercial" to "rural mixed use. " A second public hearing on the proposed ordinance is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Reeceville Elementary School, 300 Reeceville Rd. Township Supervisor Thomas McCaffrey said the current status of developed property would not be changed under the ordinance.
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With suburbanization now spread throughout the North Penn area, local and Montgomery County officials think the region's bustling network of congested commercial centers may be able to support, and benefit from, a bus line linking businesses to nearby public-transportation hubs. The bus line - which, supporters caution, is in the early planning stages and years from introduction - would most likely connect Montgomery Mall and Montgomeryville's industrial parks along the Route 309 corridor with stops on SEPTA's R5 regional rail line.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Frankford resident Dori Ann Piatkowski would love to do more Christmas shopping in her own neighborhood. Unfortunately, the 33-year-old mother of three finds there aren't a lot of choices. So Franklin Mills is her usual Christmas shopping destination, but if Frankford Avenue "had a Toys R Us and some outlet stores, I'd be shopping around here all the time," she said. "I live two blocks away. " Big discount stores and enclosed shopping malls - that's what the neighborhood merchant is up against, not only during the holiday season but throughout the year.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | By Jen Gomez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Much to the dismay of more than 200 residents, a proposed village commercial district finally was approved by the Board of Supervisors last night. After a two-hour hearing, supervisors voted, 3-1, to approve ordinances, which have undergone several revisions in the last two years, that would amend Whitpain's zoning code to create the district and rezone the area from residential to village commercial. Supervisor Nicholas Teti dissented, and Brian Young recused himself because of business dealings.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1996 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The bright lights of Manayunk are likely to get brighter still with City Council passage yesterday of a bill that will establish a special services district there. These districts are all the rage now, enabling commercial areas to tax themselves and use the money for enhanced security, street cleaning and promotion. Indeed, Philadelphia has five districts in various stages of development, from the pace-setting Center City District to Germantown, Frankford, South Street and City Avenue.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Faced with a group of vacant stores and deteriorating apartment buildings, township officials are hoping to reverse the tide by creating a redevelopment zone. Demolishing the former Kings Department Store on Route 130 would be one of the first plans of attack, according to Mayor Bob Dovey. The store has been vacant six years and has been condemned as a health and safety hazard. "The redevelopment zone would make us eligible to receive development grant moneys and low-interest loans to revitalize and repair or demolish the buildings," Dovey said.
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