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Commercial Vehicles

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NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A recent battle between a bus driver and the township has East Norriton revamping a law that governs what kind of vehicles residents can park in their driveways. Officials threatened to fine Peter Travetti when a neighbor complained six months ago that his large van, which he used to drive disabled children to school, was an eyesore. The driver got a lawyer and a smaller van, and began parking on the street, avoiding the fine. But because of the tiff, officials are beefing up the ordinance that prohibits people from parking commercial vehicles in residential areas.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township Board of Supervisors eased the minds of many residents Monday by abandoning a proposal to prohibit the parking of commercial and recreational vehicles in residential driveways. The board decided instead to keep the current zoning ordinance, which prohibits the parking of trucks over 20 feet or 6,000 pounds in all residential districts. Proposed changes could have expanded the ordinance to include any vehicle giving the outward appearance of commercial use, through attached signs, equipment or regularly carried supplies.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
RANDY MALONE has a backhoe problem. A backhoe is a large piece of construction equipment on wheels, and a few times a week you can find one parked overnight on Malone's residential Fishtown block. Malone said that it's been like this ever since he moved to this block, almost two years ago. His main issue with the backhoe is that it takes up more than one parking spot. It's an "old, classic . . . backhoe," Malone said, which means that it's about 18 to 22 feet in length.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Springfield Township officials say that some smoke has been raised over modifications to a township ordinance that restricts commercial vehicles in residential neighborhoods, but that no fire exists at the heart of the issue. "This is not a change in substance. It is not a change in the existing law," Board of Commissioners President George Pagano said. The proposed ordinance prohibits parking any vehicles over three tons with commercial lettering, ladder racks, tool boxes and other equipment in residential areas.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The supervisors have delayed a vote on banning commercial vehicles from parking on private property. The supervisors postponed a final decision after the township solicitor raised questions about the wording of the draft ordinance. Ironically, the way the ordinance was drafted, the vehicles it was intended to prohibit might instead be exempt from the regulation. Residents in the Willow Greene development in Churchville had pressed for the ban because neighbor Robert Bongiovanni had parked two yellow school buses in the driveway of his house, at St. Michaels Circle and Kitty Knight Drive.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Edgmont officials are preparing an ordinance that would prohibit parking on township streets during certain hours. During a regular meeting Tuesday night, the Edgmont Board of Supervisors voted, 2-0, to authorize township solicitor William March to prepare such an ordinance in response to residents' complaints that commercial vehicles were taking up too many parking spaces. Supervisor Lynmar Brock was absent. The township Planning Commission has recommended the measure, suggesting that parking be prohibited on township streets from 2 to 6 a.m. "I'm in favor of that concept . . . regardless of whether they're commercial vehicles or not," said Supervisor Elmer E. "Chip" Miller 3d. Sue Neuman, board chairwoman, said Edgmont decided to prepare such an ordinance after receiving complaints from residents about commercial vehicles being parked on the streets.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Edgmont officials have prepared a township ordinance that would regulate parking of commercial vehicles on public streets. During a regular meeting Wednesday night of the Edgmont Board of Supervisors, township manager David Malman said the township had prepared the ordinance after receiving complaints from residents about commercial vehicles parked in residential areas. The ordinance, which Malman said was subject to additional discussion, would restrict overnight parking of commercial vehicles on streets in areas zoned exclusively for residential use. Malman said the Board of Supervisors would hold a public hearing on the ordinance at 8 p.m. Aug. 1. In other business, Malman said the township would seek approval from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to post 35-m.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By Marie George, Special to The Inquirer
Responding to requests from school bus drivers, the township committee has lifted a ban on school buses parking in residential zones until July 1. The request to lift the ban was submitted by 10 bus drivers from the Meredith Bus Co., a private company that was recently sold to the National Bus Co. The Meredith Co. serves the Lenape School District, but all 10 drivers live in the township. The drivers said the Meredith Bus Co. permitted them to park their buses overnight in their driveways instead of driving them back to the main building in Tabernacle, about 17 miles from most drivers' homes.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Township Commitee last night tabled a proposed ordinance that would have banned pickup trucks and other commercial vehicles weighing more than 7,000 pounds from being parked on private property in residential areas. About a dozen residents attended the meeting to complain that the proposed ordinance would either put them out of business or cost them their jobs because they need their vehicles for their work. "This is going to hurt the small-time person who has a truck for his livelihood," said Michael Croissette of the 1900 block of Tinsman Avenue, who does cement work part time.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Energized by coffee and doughnuts, Newtown Township officials piled into a van last week and made the rounds on their semiannual road inspection. Making the trip were the five township supervisors, accompanied by township manager Larry Comunale, township engineer Joel DeFreytas Jr., building inspector Ron McHatton, roadmaster and van driver Bucky McDonald and reporters. The trip started at 9 a.m.; the doughnuts at 8. State law requires the semiannual road inspections to be done in April and October for townships such as Newtown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The vehicle identification numbers of a 1951 Rolls-Royce, a 2012 Jaguar, and eight Ferraris are among the 30,000 that appear on an official New Jersey website to warn consumers about vehicles damaged by the monster storm that hit the coast last fall. But after checking the online list ( njconsumeraffairs.gov/floodedcars/ ), consumers should not be complacent. The site provides the VINs of fewer than half the 72,000 vehicles in the state reported damaged by Hurricane Sandy. "There could be a dealer out there who's unscrupulous, or a person out there who might clean a car up and try to sell it," said Mike Horan, spokesman for the state Motor Vehicle Commission, which helped build the website.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buyer beware: Thousands of cars damaged in Hurricane Sandy are for sale in the Garden State, and not all of their owners may be entirely forthcoming. In New Jersey, where vehicles compromised by flooding or other means must be so identified on title transfers, more than 13,000 have been logged in the last three months, according to the Motor Vehicle Commission. Selling damaged goods isn't illegal, but officials want to ensure that no one makes an uninformed purchase. "The consumer really has to use the first line of defense, which is knowledge," Raymond P. Martinez, the agency's chairman, said Friday.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
RANDY MALONE has a backhoe problem. A backhoe is a large piece of construction equipment on wheels, and a few times a week you can find one parked overnight on Malone's residential Fishtown block. Malone said that it's been like this ever since he moved to this block, almost two years ago. His main issue with the backhoe is that it takes up more than one parking spot. It's an "old, classic . . . backhoe," Malone said, which means that it's about 18 to 22 feet in length.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
Best place to catch a ride in Center City? How about grabbing a car off the pavement around City Hall, where all types of vehicles can be found parked these days? It's an old habit that the city supposedly broke back in the Rendell administration, when the apron was cleared of unsightly vehicles. Too bad it didn't last. In a supposedly pedestrian-friendly city, people shouldn't have to worry about being run down on the pavement near the city's premier public building. But today's scene under Billy Penn's statue represents a throwback, with commercial vehicles and official-looking black SUVs parked on the apron's north side and near the northeast corner.
NEWS
January 18, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fire gutted a Coatesville garage yesterday afternoon and destroyed four vehicles belonging to a commercial power-washing business. The cause of the three-alarm blaze that broke out at about 1:50 p.m. in the 100 block of N. Sixth Avenue could not be determined. Police and fire officials were unavailable for comment. No injuries were reported. Firefighters from Coatesville, Downingtown, Parkesburg and Thorndale responded in freezing temperatures to bring the blaze under control about 3 p.m. The fire destroyed four utility trucks, valued at $50,000 each, according to Robert Judge, owner of the business, Judge Mobile Wash.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Veteran school bus driver Peg Crofton parks her yellow minibus in front of her Main Street home. She's done that for more than 30 years. No one ever complained that it was ugly or hazardous. No one ever asked her to park it somewhere else. Having the vehicle waiting for her on cold, early mornings and rainy afternoons is a luxury for the 58-year-old woman. Using the school bus as her primary transportation is a major job perk. Crofton and dozens of other local bus drivers are angry because the Township Council is considering amending an ordinance to prevent them from driving the school buses home and parking them.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For months, residents here have complained to township officials that buses, moving vans, 18-wheelers, and other big rigs have been rolling into their neighborhoods and parking - sometimes for days - on their streets. These camped vehicles, neighbors say, have caused plenty of headaches: They impede traffic. They block driveways. They obstruct views. And they're unsafe for children to play around. So officials here set out to solve the problem. Last month, they began considering amendments to the township code, which already outlaws large commercial vehicles on residential streets.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia police have been coming down hard on drivers who speed on scenic Kelly Drive. But it's not all that new, according to Capt. Frank Gramlich, commanding officer of the 92nd District, which is responsible for enforcement on the road. "We began stepping up enforcement about a year ago," Gramlich said. The catalysts were "a lot of accidents and even more so, letters of complaints from citizens who were concerned about what they thought was excessive speed on Kelly Drive.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you want to park a recreational vehicle here, you'd better have a big back yard - or be prepared to find some off-site storage space. The Borough Council last week passed an ordinance to prohibit residents from parking RVs, campers or boats on the street or in the front yards of their property, including their driveways. The ordinance takes effect immediately. The ordinance also prohibits commercial vehicles, including school buses, trailers, flatbeds, tractor-trailers, and dump trucks, from being parked in residential districts.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | By Lisa Sandberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This town is the kind of place where everyone knows everyone, where houses are modest and tidy and where loyalties among the 4,400 residents are fierce. It's also a four-square-mile community without a single supermarket, theater, liquor store or pharmacy, but it's hardly a sleepy town. Three-quarters of the Philadelphia International Airport lies in Tinicum, as do seven hotels that cater mostly to airport travelers, and 300 other businesses - many of them industrial - that employ 12,000 workers.
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