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Commercials

NEWS
December 22, 2009
The irritating scheme in which television commercials automatically spike in volume could soon be a thing of the past. Nearly everyone has experienced this obnoxious marketing ploy. You're watching a TV show and, when a commercial comes on, the volume increases dramatically without your touching the remote. Advertisers want the volume louder, in case you wander away from the TV during the commercials. If you cared about commercials, you would stay put. But you don't care, because they're commercials (unless it's during the Super Bowl)
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Could there ever have been any doubt? Michael, the nice neighbor who wooed the heroine of TV's Taster's Choice commercials for seven long years, has won her heart for good . . . just in time for Valentine's Day. Andrew, the former husband who showed up in the last few commercials making obvious attempts to win his ex back, is out of the running. This was determined by a vote among viewers of the commercials who clipped a coupon from a Taster's Choice advertisement. The outcome was reported in Soap Opera Digest.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sid F. Gitterman, 83, founder of Crown Boiler Co. in Kensington, died Sunday of heart failure and complications from Alzheimer's disease at his home in Aventura, Fla. He also had homes in Philadelphia and Atlantic City. Mr. Gitterman's company built boilers for hot-water and steam-heating systems. He retired from the daily operation of the company about 1972, but he continued to own the plant until his death. Though a successful businessman, Mr. Gitterman's heart was in show business.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Bill Boyarsky
With television screens filled with advertisements for candidates in the Nov. 4 election, let's have a few positive words about negative political commercials. True, defending them is like trying to put in a good word for a toxic dump. The 30-second commercials so popular this year exaggerate, oversimplify and unfairly state candidates' records. They are totally joyless, without the spontaneity, tension and fun of the rallies and speeches of older politics. And they are mean. But in a nation whose politics were launched by heavy-handed frontiersmen and New England pamphleteers with quills sharp as stilettos, today's commercials are part of a long tradition of rough political confrontation.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
They've started to carry commercials on Soviet television. Things may be going too fast for me. When the Soviet government, officially atheistic, started returning churches to their congregations, I managed to mutter something like "Well, nothing surprises me anymore. " When the Poles announced that part of their parliament was going to be chosen by free elections, I told myself that everything changes sooner or later. I was even able to absorb the news that the Chinese were setting up a stock exchange.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
IN TELEVISION, you get what you pay for, sooner or later. And in the case of Dish's Autohop technology - which allows DVR users to skip commercials while playing back programs from the four major networks - the price might be higher than advertised. Because those commercials we all love to hate? They pay for the "free" programming we don't want interrupted. Yes, yes, I know. "There's nothing good on network TV, anyway. " "I only watch cable. " "My dog ate my remote. " Great.
NEWS
August 7, 2010
THE SHOWS on television are asinine. So are the commercials. There, I've said it. I feel better about myself now. Unfortunately, that doesn't change the fact that stupidity rules the airwaves. Most television fare is so repetitive, so sex-driven, so lowbrow, that you can close your eyes and narrate the show even before it comes on. There will be booties, there will be breasts, and the breast and booty-bearers will eventually pick a fight over something that a 5-year-old could successfully mediate.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1986 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
We may want our TV sets, stereos, VCRs and even cars stamped "Made in Japan," but at least the commercials for all these products still have to be produced right here in the good old USA. Perhaps the destiny of the American economy is to make only the commercials, never the goods. The most talked-about commercial of the moment is for the Japanese auto firm Isuzu. It's a series of ads lumped under the title "The Liar," and it features a salesman for the company in various guises (as a race driver, on a tall rock)
SPORTS
October 31, 1996 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Charley Steiner has covered sports most of his adult life, the last eight years for ESPN. That much time spent in front of a camera should be enough to lend credibility and fame to almost any sportscaster. But over the last year, Steiner has enjoyed a level of popularity even he finds surprising. It has nothing to do with what he knows about sports, although that helps. It has more to do with doughnut crumbs, punching out college football mascots and being traded from "SportsCenter" to "Melrose Place.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Casey administration is spending $400,000 to air a television commercial that features Gov. Casey praising the benefits the state lottery confers on older citizens. David Stone, Casey's deputy chief of staff for communications, said yesterday that there also were plans to spend about $700,000 later this year for commercials that feature Casey promoting the work ethic of Pennsylvania's labor force. Stone said the governor appeared in the lottery commercial to remind Pennsylvanians that the lottery pays for important transportation, rent-rebate and drug-prescription programs for the elderly.
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