CollectionsCommission On Presidential Debates
IN THE NEWS

Commission On Presidential Debates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
Vice President Bush's campaign manager said yesterday that the Republican nominee would not debate Democrat Michael S. Dukakis before Sept. 20, effectively canceling two long-scheduled debates. James A. Baker 3d, noting that the Republican National Convention had just recently concluded, announced that "it is unlikely that a debate can occur prior to Sept. 20. " One debate had been planned for Sept. 8 in Birmingham, Ala., by the League of Women Voters and another, on foreign policy, was planned for Sept.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. - Cheri Honkala, a veteran Philadelphia antipoverty activist and Green Party vice presidential nominee, was arrested along with her running mate as they tried to enter the debate site Tuesday afternoon. Police said that Honkala and Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential nominee, were charged with disorderly conduct. The Green Party said in a statement that Stein and Honkala were walking with supporters toward the Hofstra University campus when they were met by uniformed police officers.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | By Marc Gunther, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush-Quayle '92 campaign, which for months has accused the news media of negative reporting, now says President Bush wants to debate Bill Clinton only twice, and in front of a panel of reporters. In a letter to the Clinton campaign yesterday, Bush campaign manager Robert Teeter rejected a proposal for three debates led by a single moderator, a format proposed by the bipartisan Commission on Presidential Debates and accepted by Clinton. Instead, Teeter said, the President would participate in two debates with a panel of reporters - as in 1988.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
Watch it. Do it however you prefer. Make popcorn. Chill the beer, invite the gang, make it a party. Tape it so that you don't have to miss your favorite show on the WB. But watch. The first presidential debate of the 2004 election will be held at 9 tonight near hurricane-weary Miami. You can watch it on any one of a half-dozen channels. You could watch all kinds of other things on other channels. Some of that might even be more spontaneous, less prepackaged than the exchanges tonight between President Bush and Democratic candidate John Kerry.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore's campaign reported yesterday that one of its advisers had received an unsolicited package in the mail that appeared to contain material on the debate preparations of Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush. Former Rep. Tom Downey of New York, a close friend of Gore's who has been helping him prepare for debates against the Texas governor, received an envelope with the morning mail, said his lawyer, Marc Miller. Downey removed a videotape and watched it for "a minute or less," enough to confirm that it related to Bush, Miller said.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The other candidates got their chance yesterday, such as it was. As part of the official Debate Day proceedings, the University of Richmond staged a formal debate for the presidential contenders whose names don't usually make the news or the opinion polls. The noontime event was held in a campus meeting hall, where it attracted a turn-away crowd of dozens. And the spectators far outnumbered the reporters; most of the press corps hadn't arrived in town yet. Even some of the invited candidates didn't make it. Peeved at being categorized as second-tier politicians, they sent surrogates instead.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Vicki McClure, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Call it the debate to debate. Rowan Radio offered to sponsor two debates for Washington Township's mayoral candidates. Republican Mayor Gerald Luongo, running for his fourth term, readily accepted. Councilwoman Randee Davidson, the Democratic challenger, objected to the format and said she would prefer holding only one debate at Rowan University and one in the township. Frank Hogan, general manager of WGLS-FM (88.7), proposed breaking up the debates into 30 minutes for questions from panelists, 30 minutes for candidates to question each other, and six minutes for closing statements.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Jim Lehrer told the nation that the first presidential debate's live audience would refrain from cheering, booing, and hissing, a theater full of college students in a critical swing county erupted in laughter - and hisses. Hundreds of miles from the debate at the University of Denver, more than 200 students gathered at West Chester University's Sykes Student Union on Wednesday night to watch it on a giant screen, discuss their postdebate thoughts, and participate in a "Debate Watch" officially recognized by the Commission on Presidential Debates.
NEWS
September 26, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The fate of this evening's presidential debate in Mississippi remained uncertain last night, with Republican John McCain saying he would not participate until a deal on a Wall Street plan was hashed out in Washington. After a meeting at the White House, which he and Democrat Barack Obama attended, McCain said he was "very hopeful" an agreement could be worked out in time for the debate to proceed. But he made no commitment to attend. Obama, who like McCain remained in Washington overnight, said that he planned to go to the Mississippi site regardless and that it was "important to have a debate.
NEWS
September 2, 2000
Let others join debate Do you really think there are enough differences between Al Gore and George W. Bush to create interesting TV viewing? Do you really think these two talking heads will utter anything in the debates they haven't already said a hundred times on every Sunday political news show? Neither Ralph Nader nor Pat Buchanan will be elected, but at the very least, they would make for an interesting debate, and at best, they might actually present views Gore and Bush would never bring out for fear of deviating from their hollow scripts.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. - Cheri Honkala, a veteran Philadelphia antipoverty activist and Green Party vice presidential nominee, was arrested along with her running mate as they tried to enter the debate site Tuesday afternoon. Police said that Honkala and Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential nominee, were charged with disorderly conduct. The Green Party said in a statement that Stein and Honkala were walking with supporters toward the Hofstra University campus when they were met by uniformed police officers.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Jim Lehrer told the nation that the first presidential debate's live audience would refrain from cheering, booing, and hissing, a theater full of college students in a critical swing county erupted in laughter - and hisses. Hundreds of miles from the debate at the University of Denver, more than 200 students gathered at West Chester University's Sykes Student Union on Wednesday night to watch it on a giant screen, discuss their postdebate thoughts, and participate in a "Debate Watch" officially recognized by the Commission on Presidential Debates.
NEWS
September 26, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The fate of this evening's presidential debate in Mississippi remained uncertain last night, with Republican John McCain saying he would not participate until a deal on a Wall Street plan was hashed out in Washington. After a meeting at the White House, which he and Democrat Barack Obama attended, McCain said he was "very hopeful" an agreement could be worked out in time for the debate to proceed. But he made no commitment to attend. Obama, who like McCain remained in Washington overnight, said that he planned to go to the Mississippi site regardless and that it was "important to have a debate.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
Watch it. Do it however you prefer. Make popcorn. Chill the beer, invite the gang, make it a party. Tape it so that you don't have to miss your favorite show on the WB. But watch. The first presidential debate of the 2004 election will be held at 9 tonight near hurricane-weary Miami. You can watch it on any one of a half-dozen channels. You could watch all kinds of other things on other channels. Some of that might even be more spontaneous, less prepackaged than the exchanges tonight between President Bush and Democratic candidate John Kerry.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | by Douglas Turner
If last week's presidential debate had the texture of a chunk of celery you couldn't swallow, there are simple reasons for that. The debates have gone the way of Congress, the national political conventions and the presidential campaigns themselves. They have been taken over by big companies with something to sell. Sponsors of this year's four clashes include AT&T, Anheuser-Busch, US Airways, Ford Motor Co., 3Com and Harris Interactive. The first four firms have a lot riding on getting cooperation from whoever is elected to Congress and the White House.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore's campaign reported yesterday that one of its advisers had received an unsolicited package in the mail that appeared to contain material on the debate preparations of Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush. Former Rep. Tom Downey of New York, a close friend of Gore's who has been helping him prepare for debates against the Texas governor, received an envelope with the morning mail, said his lawyer, Marc Miller. Downey removed a videotape and watched it for "a minute or less," enough to confirm that it related to Bush, Miller said.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
This week, Al Gore accomplished something big: He forced George W. Bush to campaign openly as a conservative without adjectives. Bush is still being subtle. He's not running as an old-fashioned government basher. In what can only be deemed a historic statement, Bush declared: "My party has often pointed out the limits and flaws of the Great Society. But there were successes as well, and Medicare is one of them. " Can you remember a Republican presidential candidate who ever explicitly said a single nice thing about the Great Society?
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | By Steve Thomma and David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Al Gore and George W. Bush entered the final drive of their long campaigns for the White House with Labor Day sprints through swing states that both camps believe hold the keys to victory in November. Gore raced through a 27-hour marathon, hoping to strengthen his support among crucial union voters and maintain the momentum that has moved him neck-and-neck with Bush, the best position he has been in since the campaign began. Bush confined his main holiday appearance to a 10-minute speech here in suburban Chicago aimed at generating TV sound bites, in which he tried to turn a running dispute over how and when the two men will debate into an attack on Gore's credibility.
NEWS
September 2, 2000
Let others join debate Do you really think there are enough differences between Al Gore and George W. Bush to create interesting TV viewing? Do you really think these two talking heads will utter anything in the debates they haven't already said a hundred times on every Sunday political news show? Neither Ralph Nader nor Pat Buchanan will be elected, but at the very least, they would make for an interesting debate, and at best, they might actually present views Gore and Bush would never bring out for fear of deviating from their hollow scripts.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | By Ron Hutcheson and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a stinging critique of the Clinton administration's handling of national defense, George W. Bush said yesterday that the next president would inherit a military crippled by low morale, muddled missions and inadequate equipment. The Republican presidential nominee used an appearance at a Veterans of Foreign Wars convention to underscore his belief that defense remains a potent issue even a decade after the Cold War ended. "I don't care what's said in a political campaign, these are signs of a military in decline, and we must do something about it," Bush said after citing a litany of problems with equipment and recruitment.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|